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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Drug sales in broad daylight at Lexington Market. An addict telling viewers Baltimore "is where you want to be for heroin," and then, after she scores, letting the camera watch her cook and shoot up in her car on a street that appears to be in Hampden. A masked drug dealer sitting at a table full of dope, pointing his gun at the camera and saying, "Coming to you live from Baltimore. " An on-screen headline that says, "Baltimore is the heroin capital of America. " This is how Baltimore is depicted in the National Geographic Channel's "Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire," which premieres at 9 p.m. Wednesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Drug sales in broad daylight at Lexington Market. An addict telling viewers Baltimore "is where you want to be for heroin," and then, after she scores, letting the camera watch her cook and shoot up in her car on a street that appears to be in Hampden. A masked drug dealer sitting at a table full of dope, pointing his gun at the camera and saying, "Coming to you live from Baltimore. " An on-screen headline that says, "Baltimore is the heroin capital of America. " This is how Baltimore is depicted in the National Geographic Channel's "Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire," which premieres at 9 p.m. Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
Managers of West Baltimore's historic Lexington Market are looking for a consultant to help them plan a multimillion-dollar renovation to transform the market into a regional draw. Lexington Market released the call for consulting services on Monday and expects to pick a firm by September. The 231-year-old market wants a face lift that will make it into a "food destination" attracting a "broad mix" of customers, according to the request for consulting services. Owners want the renovation to make the market better looking inside and out, improve the flow of customers in the building, and for the consultants to give recommendations on whether to promote things like healthy eating.
NEWS
June 12, 2014
I can't believe it! With all the problems Baltimore has, are we also expected to house indigent, Central American children who don't speak English and have broken the law ( "Immigrant children's center eyed for city," June 10)? What are they smoking in Washington? The solution for thousands of unaccompanied children "surging" over our borders is to return them to their own countries. Apparently, it's so easy to sneak into the United States even kids can do it. So much for the Department of Homeland Security, the "war on terror," border security or immigration reform.
NEWS
April 18, 2013
Like Baltimore author Patricia Schulteis, I too have fond memories of eating oysters with my grandfather at Faidley's seafood café in Lexington Market ("Loving Lexington Market," April 11). What the market needs is what other great regional markets, such as Philadelphia's Reading Terminal Market or New York's Chelsea Market, offer: Food manufactured on-site. The lack of local produce at Lexington Market betrays the disconnect the market currently labors under with today's foodies: The majority of the foods sold there have little connection to the location.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2012
The Baltimore region's annual gala for technology companies this year is going to be held Nov. 1 in a new and distinctly Baltimore location: Lexington Market. In past years, the networking event held by the Greater Baltimore Tech Council was held at the Baltimore Convention Center and, more recently, at Rams Head Live at the Power Plant Live in Baltimore. But this year, the GBTC was looking to emphasize Baltimore in the event, and Lexington Market -- with its many food stalls and a wide-open meeting space -- fit the bill, according to GBTC head Jason Hardebeck.
NEWS
January 16, 2010
One elderly man was killed and three people injured at Lexington Market around noon Saturday when a pickup truck went out of control and plowed into a crowd, a city fire official said. Baltimore City Fire Chief Kevin Cartwright said that a woman driving a white Ford F-150 apparently had a seizure while driving in the parking lot off North Eutaw Street, causing the truck to hit a crowd of about 200 people. She was taken to University Hospital for treatment of a possible seizure. Her female passenger was not hurt, Cartwright said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
City homicide detectives were investigating a stabbing across from Lexington Market in downtown Baltimore. Police were called to the scene, at the intersection of West Lexington and North Paca streets, at about 4:50 p.m. Friday. Crime scene tape blocked off a stretch of sidewalk in front of the Lexaco appliance store, across from one of the main entrances to the market. Blood could be seen on the sidewalk just outside the front door, while detectives stood over items marked for evidence inside the store.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
The Sun's coverage of Lexington Market has been one-sided and, in my opinion, borders on being racist ("Baltimore, merchants seek relief for a beleaguered Lexington Market," March 8). I am a teacher at Polytechnic Institute. Every year for more than three decades I have taken my English students to the central Pratt Library for a full day to kick off the work for their research papers. For many of those years, we have all walked from the library to Lexington Market for lunch. Only last month we conducted one of these scholarly field trips for this year's students.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | April 12, 2013
I laughed at a news report quoting an official who lamented that Lexington Market lacked a French bakery. The Lexington Market I know is a place that has a thriving bakery, but it sells red velvet cake by the slice and at a price to fit its customers' pocketbooks. As beat-up and poorly maintained as the market is, it possesses a thriving urban vitality. It's good to go there for a Baltimore reality check. The people-watching is incredible and a lot of money seems to change hands.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
Elephants from the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus visited a Baltimore staple Wednesday for a mid-circus snack. In town for performances at the Baltimore Arena since March 26 through April 6, the elephants visited the Lexington Market for a vegetarian buffet. Four Asian elephants made the trip, munching on bananas, carrots, apples and more outside the venue. Circus fans and children looked on in a rare opportunity to see the pachyderms on city streets. The meal is a staple alongside the circus, and has been held annually for 30 years while the elephants are in town.
NEWS
March 15, 2014
Thank you for publishing Lola J. Massey's letter to the editor in Thursday's Sun ( "Many share blame for Lexington Market's woes," March 13). Ms. Massey said it all and said it very well. Please do the citizens of Maryland who would like to use the Lexington Market Metro station, the market itself, and the surrounding business and cultural attractions a service by staying with this story and getting to the bottom of why there is no visible action on the part of city and state officials to make this area as important as the Inner Harbor, Harbor East and other tourist attractions.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
In reference to "Market malaise" (March 9), I fault the city government, the police department and all mayors past and present for the monstrosity that is World Famous Lexington Market. If reporter Scott Calvert can tell the public the story of the ugliness that prevails in and around this market, why haven't the powers that be taken charge? I used to ride the subway from Baltimore County to go to the Hippodrome Theater , but the last time I went was so devastating with the drug addicts and dealers, plus harassment of theater goers, I refuse to come back.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
The Sun's coverage of Lexington Market has been one-sided and, in my opinion, borders on being racist ("Baltimore, merchants seek relief for a beleaguered Lexington Market," March 8). I am a teacher at Polytechnic Institute. Every year for more than three decades I have taken my English students to the central Pratt Library for a full day to kick off the work for their research papers. For many of those years, we have all walked from the library to Lexington Market for lunch. Only last month we conducted one of these scholarly field trips for this year's students.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
The pill peddlers were busy on Eutaw Street. Up and down the sidewalk they shuffled, hawking a variety of goods - methadone, the anxiety drug Xanax and other prescription medications - in a street code repeated over and over. "Bukes and bars, bukes and bars," one man said rhythmically, slang for the buprenorphine strips used to treat heroin addiction and bar-shaped Xanax tablets. Steps away, a huge sign heralded the entrance to another busy world of buying and selling: "World Famous Lexington Market," a fixture on downtown Baltimore's west side since 1782.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2014
A move nearly 10 years in the making starts Monday as the Social Security Administration begins relocating 1,600 employees from a massive facility near Lexington Market to a new, trimmer facility uptown. They leave behind two blocks of empty buildings from 1980, the outdated remnants of a federal plan to inject economic activity into Baltimore's west side — an area still struggling to capture the renaissance occurring in other parts of the city. The complex's workers, whose numbers have dropped from almost 3,500 in 2001, once generated 20 percent of sales at the nearby Italian deli Trinacria, said Vince Fava, owner of the Paca Street fixture that sells sandwiches, homemade pasta and other gourmet products.
NEWS
By Kirby Fowler | June 28, 2011
With the growing demand for locally produced food and with area farmers' markets gaining popularity, now is a perfect time to evaluate Baltimore's city-owned markets — in particular, Lexington Market, the grandfather of them all. Lexington Market is the oldest continually operating market in the country. It was created in 1782 on land donated by Revolutionary War hero John Eager Howard. The first merchants came by wagon from as far away as Towson to sell goods in what was, at that time, just an open field.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
A 23-year-old man was stabbed to death Thursday in a downtown neighborhood just north of Lexington Market, and police said they have charged a man in the killing. Police found the man, identified as Cortez A. Lemon, shortly after 5 p.m. lying on the sidewalk in the 400 block of West Saratoga St. He had sustained multiple stab wounds to his chest and abdomen and was taken to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he died at 7:10 p.m. On Friday, police said Troy Harrison, 21, had been arrested and charged in the killing, but details were not immediately available.
NEWS
By Susan Kennedy | September 29, 2013
Last October, I started therapy. Not physical or psychotherapy but Orientation and Mobility (O&M) therapy. O&M is when a person with a visual impairment learns skills for independent travel, including how to use a white cane. October is Blindness Awareness Month, and I'd like to share my experience with you. Blindness is not an absolute. Light perception, peripheral and central vision, and blind spots differ from person to person. I live in the gray space of low vision between the light of sight and the darkness of full blindness.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2013
The federal government began the process Wednesday of selling a 1.1 million square foot complex on North Greene Street in downtown Baltimore that officials expect to be vacant by next year. The massive Metro West facility, located near the University of Maryland Medical Center and Lexington Market, has been the home to about 1,600 Social Security Administration employees since 1980. The agency announced in 2009 it would move to Northwest Baltimore. The General Services Administration said Wednesday it will formally solicit ideas from developers about what to do with the site beginning Aug. 8. The agency said it is particularly interested in exchanging the building for construction and repair services on other federal facilities.
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