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By Special to The Sun | April 18, 1993
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- The Charles Town Races will present a simulcast of this afternoon's $125,000-added Lexington Stakes, a 1 1/16-mile test for 3-year-olds, as part of a full-card simulcast from Keeneland Park in Lexington, Ky.The Lexington, one of the final preps leading up to racing's Triple Crown, will be run as Keeneland's eighth race with post time for the first of nine races at 1 p.m.
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NEWS
April 2, 2014
Elephants from the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus visited a Baltimore staple Wednesday for a mid-circus snack. In town for performances at the Baltimore Arena since March 26 through April 6, the elephants visited the Lexington Market for a vegetarian buffet. Four Asian elephants made the trip, munching on bananas, carrots, apples and more outside the venue. Circus fans and children looked on in a rare opportunity to see the pachyderms on city streets. The meal is a staple alongside the circus, and has been held annually for 30 years while the elephants are in town.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
A light-rail train and a vehicle collided at the intersection of Howard and Lexington streets in Baltimore on Tuesday, a Maryland Transit Administration spokesman said. A car turned into the path of a train around 3:56 p.m., said MTA spokesman Terry Owens. He said one light rail rider claimed injury but refused treatment when medics arrived. The driver of the vehicle was not injured, he said. Service was delayed for about a half-hour until the medic arrived, Owens said. The driver of the vehicle is believed to be at fault, he said, but added that the crash was still under investigation.
NEWS
March 15, 2014
Thank you for publishing Lola J. Massey's letter to the editor in Thursday's Sun ( "Many share blame for Lexington Market's woes," March 13). Ms. Massey said it all and said it very well. Please do the citizens of Maryland who would like to use the Lexington Market Metro station, the market itself, and the surrounding business and cultural attractions a service by staying with this story and getting to the bottom of why there is no visible action on the part of city and state officials to make this area as important as the Inner Harbor, Harbor East and other tourist attractions.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | August 31, 1993
YOU may not think of the "Peanut Shoppe" as a monument. It's an unimposing store just off the southwest corner of Lexington and Liberty streets at 101 W. Lexington.But a monument it is -- to the days when the once-and-famous first block of West Lexington Street included such well-remembered Baltimore institutions as the Century and the Valencia movies, Huylers Fountain Shop, Maron's candies and the Lexway movie. (Is there a better remembered block from pre-renaissance Baltimore?)Of the establishments that made up the block in the years before they were torn down to make way for Charles Center, the "Peanut Shoppe" is all that's left.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | November 16, 1992
Even the elements seemed to conspire against Teri Reyes and her crusade to bring a playground to the community of homes and children in the Lexington Run subdivision.The long-awaited playground was set to be installed last weekend, but rain and cold weather prompted volunteers to postpone the event until Saturday. On Saturday, Ms. Reyes and others discovered the holes they had dug for the equipment were too shallow and in the wrong spots.Yesterday, volunteers faced unusually cold weather and snow flurries.
NEWS
May 14, 1998
BALTIMORE CLEARLY has money to burn. Why else would the city hire a consultant to study bringing cars back to Lexington Mall when another set of advisers has not reported on a plan to revitalize the troubled Howard Street retail corridor?In 1974, when cars were banned from three blocks of Lexington Street between Cathedral and Eutaw streets, pedestrian malls were an urban craze. In city after city, the shared belief seemed to be that marginal retail areas would thrive again if shoppers jTC could stroll in landscaped areas without having to dodge traffic.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 13, 1996
The laid-back college town of Lexington, Va., cherishes its Revolutionary and Civil War history along with its local eccentrics. And the state-supported Virginia Military Institute is just part of the community -- albeit a part of the community where women need not apply.Any day now, after six years of legal wrangling, the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether VMI has been violating the Constitution by refusing to admit women and, if so, what should be done about that.But in Lexington, the residents -- even those who support women's rights and believe VMI's policies can't be defended -- take a more neighborly view.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
Often, younger brothers try to follow in the footsteps of older brothers. That's been reversed for the Lexington, Ky., team in the Cal Ripken World Series. The Lexington team that will play Aberdeen at 8 tonight has three boys whose younger brothers have been there and done that. Just 10 days ago, the Lexington 10-year-old team won the Cal Ripken World Series in Williamsburg, Va. Devin Jackson, Stephen Kimbrell and Scout McCamy played for the 10-year-old champs, and now their older brothers -- Logan Jackson, Lee Kimbrell and Chris McCamy -- are trying to bring home a title for the 12-year-old team.
TRAVEL
By Sarah Clayton and Sarah Clayton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 23, 2004
Lexington is a handsome little village with good buildings. - Isaac Burr, traveling in Virginia in 1804 The night was dark, the narrow country road deserted. The lights from the few houses along the way looked like distant stars. I'd never been to Clark's Lumber Yard, but I'd heard things got hopping out there on Friday nights. The Saw Mill Band, led by 82-year-old Bruce Clark, started playing at 7:30 p.m., and the dancing started at 7:31. Or so I'd been told. Quite frankly, I couldn't imagine anything "hopping" down this remote road, 15 miles north of Lexington, Va., in rural Rockbridge County, except maybe a frog or two. But then again, the Lexington area can surprise you. Bluegrass and Bach mix comfortably here, and visitors will find a thriving intellectual community in the midst of a gorgeous rural setting.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
The Sun's coverage of Lexington Market has been one-sided and, in my opinion, borders on being racist ("Baltimore, merchants seek relief for a beleaguered Lexington Market," March 8). I am a teacher at Polytechnic Institute. Every year for more than three decades I have taken my English students to the central Pratt Library for a full day to kick off the work for their research papers. For many of those years, we have all walked from the library to Lexington Market for lunch. Only last month we conducted one of these scholarly field trips for this year's students.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
In reference to "Market malaise" (March 9), I fault the city government, the police department and all mayors past and present for the monstrosity that is World Famous Lexington Market. If reporter Scott Calvert can tell the public the story of the ugliness that prevails in and around this market, why haven't the powers that be taken charge? I used to ride the subway from Baltimore County to go to the Hippodrome Theater , but the last time I went was so devastating with the drug addicts and dealers, plus harassment of theater goers, I refuse to come back.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
The pill peddlers were busy on Eutaw Street. Up and down the sidewalk they shuffled, hawking a variety of goods - methadone, the anxiety drug Xanax and other prescription medications - in a street code repeated over and over. "Bukes and bars, bukes and bars," one man said rhythmically, slang for the buprenorphine strips used to treat heroin addiction and bar-shaped Xanax tablets. Steps away, a huge sign heralded the entrance to another busy world of buying and selling: "World Famous Lexington Market," a fixture on downtown Baltimore's west side since 1782.
SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos and The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
The 3-year-old colt who inspired a summer fervor for Maryland horse racing by winning five straight races, including the 2013 Kentucky Derby, is entering retirement. Orb, owned by Baltimore native Stuart S. Janney III and home-bred at Phipps Stable, will enter stud at Claiborne Farm in Kentucky next year, finishing his career as a millionaire and multiple Grade 1 stakes winner. “I have very mixed emotions about it, because I really would have loved to run him next year,” Janney said.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
A company that insures bail bonds is suing Maryland's District Court for being too lenient on its own industry. What gives? Lexington National Insurance Corp. says the playing field on which it's competing with rival companies is not level. The Cockeysville company alleges in a lawsuit filed last month that the state courts have thrown away as much as $3 million by defying state law and not making competitors pay up when defendants jump bail or miss their court dates. Lexington National says in its lawsuit that the practice puts them "at a distinct competitive disadvantage" with noncompliant insurance companies because it regularly pays forfeited bail bond bills, as required by a 2011 law. Representatives for the District Court and Chief Clerk Roberta L. Warnken, who is listed as a co-defendant, declined to comment on the lawsuit.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
The former developer of the long-stalled "Superblock" project has accused the city of improperly terminating its deal for the downtown west-side property — and is demanding millions in compensation. Lexington Square Partners is seeking to "recover all costs incurred" during the group's six years working on the project plus 10 percent interest, according to a letter from Mark Pollak of the law firm Ballard Spahr LLP, which represents the developer, to city officials. "Unfortunately, the city's actions leave [the]
NEWS
By P.J. Huffstutter and P.J. Huffstutter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 28, 2004
LEXINGTON, Ky. - Here in the heart of tobacco country, where farmers have nurtured fields of rich burley leaf since the 1700s, Lexington has done the unthinkable: Banned smoking. Karl Evans sat on a stool at Nicholson's Cigar Bar and stared at the clock, grimacing as the minute hand ticked toward 12:01 a.m. Tuesday. Teeth clamped down on a Marlboro cigarette, he took a deep, determined draw. In just under an hour, he would have to stub it out or be in violation of a new local ordinance banning smoking.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2005
Trevor Gott lets his arm do his talking. The right-hander struck out nine in three innings, didn't give up a hit and walked one to lead Southeast Lexington, Ky., to a 2-0 victory over West Raleigh, N.C., in a matchup of 2-0 teams in the Cal Ripken 12-and-under World Series in Aberdeen yesterday. "I just don't like to talk, but, yes, I expected it to be a good game with them," said the shy Gott, who kept his head down as he barely responded, though several of his teammates were standing around him. The win clinched a berth out of the American Division for Friday's single-elimination playoffs.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
I cannot believe that our mayor or any other city or state officials would even consider allotting up to $25 million for renovations at Lexington Market ("Lexington's update," April 7). As a retired merchant with 30 years' experience at Lexington Market, I suggest management give more thought to painting and to hiring a good Realtor to bring in gourmet cheese shops and a French bakery. The market should also offer incentives and stop the beer and liquor drinking among customers shopping in the market.
NEWS
April 18, 2013
Like Baltimore author Patricia Schulteis, I too have fond memories of eating oysters with my grandfather at Faidley's seafood café in Lexington Market ("Loving Lexington Market," April 11). What the market needs is what other great regional markets, such as Philadelphia's Reading Terminal Market or New York's Chelsea Market, offer: Food manufactured on-site. The lack of local produce at Lexington Market betrays the disconnect the market currently labors under with today's foodies: The majority of the foods sold there have little connection to the location.
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