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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2001
In his first race outside New York, Peeping Tom won the $200,000 General George Handicap yesterday at Laurel Park so convincingly that he stamped himself as a horse of national significance. A 4-year-old gelding stabled at Belmont Park, Peeping Tom capitalized on a blistering early duel by two speedsters to charge from last place, through and around horses, for a 3 1/2 -length victory. His time of 1 minute, 22 seconds for the seven furlongs fell three-fifths of a second off the 12-year-old track record of Tappiano.
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SPORTS
Mike Preston | March 7, 2014
The term around the Loyola lacrosse team is "Fletched," as in the opposing attackman got "Fletched. " Or when the Greyhouds' star defenseman runs away from two attackmen after stealing a ground ball, they both got "Fletched. " Loyola's Joe Fletcher might be the best defenseman in college lacrosse. He was the only college player selected to the U.S. national training roster for the 2014 World Cup, and he is a specialist, just like a face-off player. If you want to shut down the team's top goal scoring attackman, send Fletcher.
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SPORTS
June 13, 2006
Good morning --World Cup -- Is "one and done" in the soccer lexicon?
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2009
Over time, most good marriages develop a secret language. At a party, one of you will be able to pull out an agreed-upon code phrase that sounds innocent enough, such as "Did you check in with the baby sitter?" But both of you will know this really means, "We'll stay just 10 minutes more and then leave." If the two of you are not all that verbal, you might use symbolic gestures instead, much like the ones professional ballplayers use. For example, a hand brushing hair off the forehead means: "Let's exit this boring social obligation."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2001
Disco Rico has used his afterburners for six furlongs. Today, he must make them last for an extra eighth of a mile. An explosive Maryland-bred son of Citidancer and Round It Off, Disco Rico is the top local hope in the General George Handicap at Laurel Park. A Grade II $200,000 stakes of seven furlongs, the General George is the male counterpart of the Barbara Fritchie Handicap, run Saturday at Laurel. Together, they make up Winter Sprintfest, one of Maryland's premier events for thoroughbreds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | April 7, 2005
Baseball and Art Where: 1760 Bank St. in Fells Point When: 1:05 p.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. Why: Because local painter Ronald R. Russell is displaying roughly 20 of his baseball paintings. The works, which are acrylic and latex on paper, illustrate archaic terms from the baseball lexicon. If you know what it means to have "a busted pickle," this is your show. Refreshments will include beer, peanuts and crackerjacks. Information: 410-675-8959 - Annie Linskey
FEATURES
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 30, 1991
After the sportswear '70s and the power-look-driven '80s, the no-stress '90s are putting a new spin on one of fashion's oldest concepts: the dress.It's everywhere, in every shape at every price. The news is in comfortably clean-lined sheaths, A-line shifts, trapeze styles, coatdresses and fit-and-flare looks. Generally skimming somewhere over the knee, these dresses can pop with bright Mondrian-esque color-blocks and floral and geometric prints or glow in soft pastels and summer whites. The key message: Keep it simple.
SPORTS
February 17, 2001
The Maryland Jockey Club will present SprintFest at Laurel Park with two graded stakes races highlighting the Presidents Day weekend. In addition, there will be an autograph session with the jockeys today (11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.) and the first 4,000 paid customers on Monday receive a free Laurel Park sweat shirt. Post time for the entire weekend is 12:40 p.m. Today Six horses are scheduled to run in the $200,000 Barbara Fritchie Handicap (Grade II). The early favorite in the seven-furlong race is California-based Nany's Sweep (5-2)
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2000
John Goodspeed, the premier lexicographer of Baltimorese, orders a drink at the clubhouse of the Easton Club Golf Course with precise instructions: "I'm going to have a Stoli vodka martini, with a twist, straight up and very dry. That means four drops of vermouth." Still briskly urbane at 80, but no longer urban, Goodspeed chronicled with equal precision the folkways, fantasies and foibles of Baltimoreans from 1951 to 1967 as the auteur of the late and much-lamented "Mr. Peep's Diary," an Evening Sun column still remembered as one of "Balamer's" finest.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens | April 14, 2003
I WISH for sweet dreams, slumber free from shouts of war. But the nightmare in Iraq has me tossing and turning until the dawn. I know I'm not the only one. Now there are multiple casualties. POWs. Now comes the horrific human toll war caustically demands, and no easy refuge from the anguish we first only imagined but surely knew was imminent. It's upon us, resounding as loudly as The Star-Spangled Banner at an all-American baseball game. Oh say can you see soldiers marching headlong into the valley of the shadow of death?
SPORTS
June 13, 2006
Good morning --World Cup -- Is "one and done" in the soccer lexicon?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | April 7, 2005
Baseball and Art Where: 1760 Bank St. in Fells Point When: 1:05 p.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. Why: Because local painter Ronald R. Russell is displaying roughly 20 of his baseball paintings. The works, which are acrylic and latex on paper, illustrate archaic terms from the baseball lexicon. If you know what it means to have "a busted pickle," this is your show. Refreshments will include beer, peanuts and crackerjacks. Information: 410-675-8959 - Annie Linskey
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2004
Classes had only been in session a few weeks when eighth-grade English teacher Gayle Sands began to notice the curious shorthand and abbreviations creeping into her pupils' essays. "The story introduces 2 diff. bus drivers," one girl wrote. "She thinks she needs to defend the young people b/c she is young," scribbled another pupil. With three computer-savvy teen-agers of her own, Sands instantly recognized the culprit: instant messaging. With the casual lexicon of instant messaging, or IMing - where btw replaces by the way, where b4 substitutes for before and where 2 becomes the stand-in for to, two and too - infiltrating students' schoolwork, such mistakes are soaking up nearly as much red ink as the perennial spelling and grammar errors that typically catch teachers' eyes.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens | April 14, 2003
I WISH for sweet dreams, slumber free from shouts of war. But the nightmare in Iraq has me tossing and turning until the dawn. I know I'm not the only one. Now there are multiple casualties. POWs. Now comes the horrific human toll war caustically demands, and no easy refuge from the anguish we first only imagined but surely knew was imminent. It's upon us, resounding as loudly as The Star-Spangled Banner at an all-American baseball game. Oh say can you see soldiers marching headlong into the valley of the shadow of death?
SPORTS
By Mike Penner and Larry Stewart and Mike Penner and Larry Stewart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2002
LOS ANGELES - Chick Hearn, the legendary broadcaster who provided the lively soundtrack to more than four decades of Los Angeles Lakers basketball, inventing a new vocabulary along the way, died yesterday. He was 85. Hearn died at 6:30 p.m. local time at Northridge Hospital Medical Center, where he was admitted Friday night after taking a fall at his home. He underwent two brain craniotomies to control brain hemorrhaging on Saturday but never regained consciousness. He declined seriously Sunday night and throughout the day yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chicago Tribune | February 24, 2002
If FDR had had his way, World War II would have been known forevermore as the "War for Survival." Tough luck, Mr. Roosevelt. Not even the president has the power to decide what terminology people will adopt in everyday life. "World War II" won the popular vote in a slam dunk. And, in a flourish of linguistic retro-fitting, what had been the "Great War" thenceforth became known as World War I. So dictionary editors are keeping an ear close to the ground these days, tracking not only all the new military terms, but how regular people are using the language of the war in their day-to-day lives.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2009
Over time, most good marriages develop a secret language. At a party, one of you will be able to pull out an agreed-upon code phrase that sounds innocent enough, such as "Did you check in with the baby sitter?" But both of you will know this really means, "We'll stay just 10 minutes more and then leave." If the two of you are not all that verbal, you might use symbolic gestures instead, much like the ones professional ballplayers use. For example, a hand brushing hair off the forehead means: "Let's exit this boring social obligation."
NEWS
By NEIL A. GRAUER | September 7, 1997
Will "Baltimore lawyer" replace "Phila-delphia lawyer" in the nation's lexicon - but as a compliment, not a pejorative? n n n."Philadelphia lawyer" is an appellation connoting cleverness bordering on shiftiness - "a tricky lawyer, especially one skilled in taking advantage of legal technicalities," according to the dictionary.(The irony is that this expression originated as a reference to Andrew Hamilton of Philadelphia, who successfully defended pioneering newspaper editor John Peter Zenger in a landmark 1735 libel case that helped establish the foundation for one of our basic civil liberties, freedom of the press.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2001
In his first race outside New York, Peeping Tom won the $200,000 General George Handicap yesterday at Laurel Park so convincingly that he stamped himself as a horse of national significance. A 4-year-old gelding stabled at Belmont Park, Peeping Tom capitalized on a blistering early duel by two speedsters to charge from last place, through and around horses, for a 3 1/2 -length victory. His time of 1 minute, 22 seconds for the seven furlongs fell three-fifths of a second off the 12-year-old track record of Tappiano.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2001
Disco Rico has used his afterburners for six furlongs. Today, he must make them last for an extra eighth of a mile. An explosive Maryland-bred son of Citidancer and Round It Off, Disco Rico is the top local hope in the General George Handicap at Laurel Park. A Grade II $200,000 stakes of seven furlongs, the General George is the male counterpart of the Barbara Fritchie Handicap, run Saturday at Laurel. Together, they make up Winter Sprintfest, one of Maryland's premier events for thoroughbreds.
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