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By Ken Rosenthal and Mike Preston and Ken Rosenthal and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff researcher Dee Lyons contributed to this article | September 11, 1994
More than a year later, Inez "Peggy" Ritch can't let go.Her Northeast Baltimore home is full of memories -- framed photographs, award certificates, handsome trophies. Mementoes of her son, Reggie Lewis, the basketball star.Reggie Lewis, who died on July 27, 1993, at the age of 27."It's been difficult," Ritch says. "I'm trying to adjust to this. People tell you, 'Give it to the Lord, pray.' I do. But evidently, I must not have done it. It's still with me."Every day, I close my eyes to sleep.
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March 26, 1999
BasketballNortheastern probe found no evidence Lewis used drugsAn internal Northeastern University investigation turned over in a court battle over the sudden death of Boston Celtics star and Dunbar alumnus Reggie Lewis found no evidence that he used cocaine in college.In a motion filed in the medical malpractice case, lawyers for Lewis' estate said "every credible witness with personal knowledge states unequivocally before the Northeastern Commission that Reggie Lewis never used cocaine."
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer Tara Finnegan and Derek Toney contributed to this article | July 28, 1993
BOSTON -- The death of Reggie Lewis sent this city -- and the sports world -- into shock and mourning last night.At a hastily called news conference late last night at the Boston Garden, Celtics president Dave Gavitt said: "The only thing I can say is that our hearts are very heavy tonight for Reggie Lewis and his family. Reggie Lewis was an outstanding basketball player, but more importantly, Reggie Lewis was an outstanding human being. He had so much to give to the community, to the Celtics and to his family."
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1997
With a yellowed and snaggle-toothed skull in his hands, Professor James E. Starrs struts before his George Washington University law students like Hamlet at the grave of Yorick.He's discussing physical anthropology. But you almost expect him to declaim: "Alas, poor Yorick, I knew him well, Horatio: a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy ..."Dr. Starrs does have a lot of the theatrical about him. He's easily one of America's most famous forensic scientists, an academic sleuth investigating historical mysteries with everything from ground-searching radar to exhumation.
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By Tara Finnegan and Derek Toney and Tara Finnegan and Derek Toney,Contributing Writers | July 28, 1993
The death of former Dunbar High School basketball star Reggie Lewis stunned an East Baltimore community and the sports world last night."There's no reaction . . . just a cold reaction," said Herman Harried, a former teammate of Lewis's at Dunbar. "I really don't know what to make of this. One minute, he's OK . . . the next minute, he's not."Lewis, the Boston Celtics star who collapsed with a heart ailment during a playoff game last April, collapsed again while shooting baskets at Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass.
SPORTS
By Boston Globe | July 28, 1993
BOSTON -- Even as Reggie Lewis' survival was hanging in the balance last night, the crass-sounding but inevitable legal questions began to surface. Questions such as whether the Boston Celtics are in any way liable for his being back on a court at Brandeis University and whether doctors who gave him the green light opened themselves to lawsuits.The standard for medical malpractice is a straightforward one: "It's what the average, reasonably prudent doctor in that specialty should have diagnosed based on the circumstances he faced," said Neil Sugarman, president of the Massachusetts Academy of Trial Attorneys.
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | August 3, 1993
BOSTON -- They came from as far away as Australia, and from as nearby as the neighborhoods surrounding Northeastern University. They waited in the early-morning heat, some for more than five hours, then filled sweltering Matthews Arena with their love and admiration for Reggie Lewis.In the old gymnasium where he built his reputation and where his uniform number has hung from the rafters for four years, about 6,000 fans, friends, relatives and teammates paid their respects to the late Boston Celtics captain and the most famous sixth man in Dunbar High School history.
SPORTS
By Dan Shaughnessy and Dan Shaughnessy,The Boston Globe | March 10, 1995
If Reggie wasn't black, nobody would have raised the issue of drugs.That is the politically correct threat that often makes us back away. That's what Reggie Lewis' family and friends said after he collapsed on a Brandeis basketball court and died. It was what Celtics owner Paul Gaston said yesterday when he announced plans to sue the Wall Street Journal for $100 million."Racist," Gaston replied to a question about the Journal's motivation for exploring the possibility that cocaine abuse contributed to Lewis' death.
NEWS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Staff Writer | July 29, 1993
For Russell Lewis, it was a family meeting that left him with mixed feelings. As the doctor told the group of about 10 family members that gathered at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston that Reggie Lewis was fine, his uncle couldn't help but think about the results from days before that said the Boston Celtics captain and former Dunbar High standout had a potentially life-threatening heart ailment."
NEWS
July 29, 1993
News of Reggie Lewis' death shocked even people who never saw him play or followed his exploits on the sports pages. The former Dunbar High basketball player and captain of the vaunted Boston Celtics collapsed and died while leisurely shooting baskets on Tuesday.His premature death at age 27, apparently from a heart abnormality, taps the kind of head-shaking dread people felt when they learned that basketball superstar Earvin "Magic" Johnson had AIDS, or that Maryland basketball All-American Len Bias had died of a drug overdose, or that runner Jim Fixx had dropped dead, or more recently, when death-defying auto racer Davey Allison perished in a helicopter crash.
SPORTS
By JERRY BEMBRY | March 21, 1995
So he's not Superman. He can't jump into a phone booth, switch from a baseball uniform to a basketball uniform, and dominate. Yet.Michael Jordan's performance may have been subpar Sunday in his return after nearly two seasons off, but it will be only a matter of time before he's back to his unstoppable self. He sure wasn't bashful, jacking up 28 shots while playing 43 minutes in his debut.Jordan's return raises many questions:* If the Chicago Bulls win another couple of championships and Jordan wins a few more Most Valuable Player awards, does No. 45 get retired as well?
SPORTS
By Dan Shaughnessy and Dan Shaughnessy,The Boston Globe | March 10, 1995
If Reggie wasn't black, nobody would have raised the issue of drugs.That is the politically correct threat that often makes us back away. That's what Reggie Lewis' family and friends said after he collapsed on a Brandeis basketball court and died. It was what Celtics owner Paul Gaston said yesterday when he announced plans to sue the Wall Street Journal for $100 million."Racist," Gaston replied to a question about the Journal's motivation for exploring the possibility that cocaine abuse contributed to Lewis' death.
NEWS
By This article was compiled by Sun staff writer Frank D. Roylance, with reporting by staff writers Diana Sugg, Mike Preston and Ken Rosenthal and contributing writer Ian Browne. and This article was compiled by Sun staff writer Frank D. Roylance, with reporting by staff writers Diana Sugg, Mike Preston and Ken Rosenthal and contributing writer Ian Browne.,Sun Staff Report | March 10, 1995
Doctors who examined the late Boston Celtics player Reggie Lewis say they believed his heart quite likely was damaged by cocaine before the former Dunbar High basketball star collapsed and died of heart failure near Boston in 1993.A report in yesterday's Wall Street Journal, however, said the doctors kept silent about their suspicions under influence from the Celtics and Mr. Lewis' family, who stood to lose millions of dollars if his illness was linked to drugs.The newspaper's report offered no proof of cocaine abuse.
NEWS
By This article was compiled by Sun staff writer Frank D. Roylance, with reporting by staff writers Diana Sugg, Mike Preston and Ken Rosenthal and contributing writer Ian Browne | March 10, 1995
Doctors who examined the late Boston Celtics player Reggie Lewis say they believed his heart quite likely was damaged by cocaine before the former Dunbar High basketball star collapsed and died of heart failure near Boston in 1993.A report in yesterday's Wall Street Journal, however, said the doctors kept silent about their suspicions under influence from the Celtics and Mr. Lewis' family, who stood to lose millions of dollars if his illness was linked to drugs.The newspaper's report offered no proof of cocaine abuse.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Mike Preston and Ken Rosenthal and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff researcher Dee Lyons contributed to this article | September 11, 1994
More than a year later, Inez "Peggy" Ritch can't let go.Her Northeast Baltimore home is full of memories -- framed photographs, award certificates, handsome trophies. Mementoes of her son, Reggie Lewis, the basketball star.Reggie Lewis, who died on July 27, 1993, at the age of 27."It's been difficult," Ritch says. "I'm trying to adjust to this. People tell you, 'Give it to the Lord, pray.' I do. But evidently, I must not have done it. It's still with me."Every day, I close my eyes to sleep.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1994
At 6 feet 7, 235 pounds, power forward Kevin McDuffie is built like something out of a Michelangelo work. McDuffie's chest sticks out about two inches more than his flat, hard stomach, and his shoulders are reminiscent of those on a linebacker. His powerful legs provide him with the jump he needs to grab the ball as it comes off the boards.But beneath his muscular exterior, McDuffie continues to be haunted by the sudden death of one of his closest childhood buddies, Reggie Lewis, the former Dunbar High and Boston Celtics star and McDuffie's Northeastern University teammate who collapsed and died of cardiac arrest last July.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1997
With a yellowed and snaggle-toothed skull in his hands, Professor James E. Starrs struts before his George Washington University law students like Hamlet at the grave of Yorick.He's discussing physical anthropology. But you almost expect him to declaim: "Alas, poor Yorick, I knew him well, Horatio: a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy ..."Dr. Starrs does have a lot of the theatrical about him. He's easily one of America's most famous forensic scientists, an academic sleuth investigating historical mysteries with everything from ground-searching radar to exhumation.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer Staff writer Jerry Bembry contributed to this article | July 29, 1993
BOSTON -- The first meeting between Boston Celtics officials and Donna Harris-Lewis since the death of her husband, Celtics captain and former Dunbar star Reggie Lewis, is expected to take place here this morning.Lewis, 27, died Tuesday after suffering complete cardiac arrest while shooting baskets at the team's practice facility at nearby Brandeis University. Lewis' death came nearly three months after he collapsed during a playoff game.After a meeting yesterday that was attended by high-ranking team officials as well as Celtics guard Dee Brown, general manager Jan Volk said through a team spokesman that no public statements would be made for at least another 24 hours out of respect for the Lewis family.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 3, 1993
BOSTON -- It figures that this city, which takes sports so seriously, would take the death of Reggie Lewis so hard.Not that the pain is felt exclusively here, where he played college and professional basketball and captained the sacred Celtics. I haven't been in Baltimore for 10 days now, but I'm sure Lewis' hometown must be grieving, too.There's something about his life and death that transcends every barrier, even the racial one, and it's this: We like our heroes as big as we can get them, and we need their journeys to be complete.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | August 3, 1993
BOSTON -- They came from as far away as Australia, and from as nearby as the neighborhoods surrounding Northeastern University. They waited in the early-morning heat, some for more than five hours, then filled sweltering Matthews Arena with their love and admiration for Reggie Lewis.In the old gymnasium where he built his reputation and where his uniform number has hung from the rafters for four years, about 6,000 fans, friends, relatives and teammates paid their respects to the late Boston Celtics captain and the most famous sixth man in Dunbar High School history.
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