Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLewinsky Scandal
IN THE NEWS

Lewinsky Scandal

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
At the height of the Monica Lewinsky scandal, when the Clinton administration was consumed with damage control, a White House aide reached out to Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening and asked the fellow Democrat to back off his criticism of the president, according to a trove of documents released Friday by the Clinton Presidential Library. President Bill Clinton's former director of intergovernmental affairs, Mickey Ibarra, wrote in a Sept. 7, 1998, memo that he spoke to Glendening the day before and "delivered our message (it does not help any of us to pile on)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
At the height of the Monica Lewinsky scandal, when the Clinton administration was consumed with damage control, a White House aide reached out to Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening and asked the fellow Democrat to back off his criticism of the president, according to a trove of documents released Friday by the Clinton Presidential Library. President Bill Clinton's former director of intergovernmental affairs, Mickey Ibarra, wrote in a Sept. 7, 1998, memo that he spoke to Glendening the day before and "delivered our message (it does not help any of us to pile on)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In an incumbent-friendly year when most members of Congress could cruise to re-election, House Republican leaders are on a collision course with President Clinton over the only task they must get done: passing spending bills to keep the government running.White House officials and congressional Republicans are positioning themselves to blame each other if their confrontation threatens a government shutdown shortly before the election.The White House says the conflict centers on controversial policy changes wedged into spending bills, from restrictions on the 2000 Census and family planning to global warming and public housing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Monty Phan and Monty Phan,NEWSDAY | April 2, 2001
It might seem that Matt Drudge would have little use for a site that proclaims itself as "the single best source for facts on the Net," but there's the link, right there on the Drudge Report Web site. After all, Drudge - the Internet newshound best known for breaking the Monica Lewinsky scandal - moves so quickly to convert raw information to Web site fodder that something like the "Drudge Reference Desk" might seem incongruent. But the Drudge referred to in that link isn't Matt at all, but his father, Bob, who has worked for six years to pull together Refdesk.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr threatened Attorney General Janet Reno with a court fight yesterday if the Justice Department goes ahead with an investigation of him, or at least if it conducts the probe in a way that he does not like.He raised that prospect in a court filing at the same time that the Justice Department, in its own filing, insisted that it has full authority to investigate Starr's performance, a step it plans to take before deciding whether to fire him.The court papers seemed to escalate the tension that has been building in the weeks since Starr was formally notified that the department is planning to open a probe of allegations that he and his staff have misused their powers.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 20, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The announced resignation of House Speaker-designate Robert L. Livingston sent shock waves through Capitol Hill yesterday, forcing the nation's political establishment to confront just how dangerous a wave of sexual recrimination has become."
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 20, 1998
LAUREL -- Despite Republican efforts to target supporters of President Clinton, the fortunes of Rep. Steny H. Hoyer and other Democratic lawmakers depend much more on people like Lisa Turner than Monica Lewinsky.Turner, 32, a Democrat and mother of three from Laurel who voted twice for Clinton, thinks he should resign because he lied to his wife and the country about his involvement with Lewinsky. But Turner has no problem voting for Hoyer, a loyal friend of Clinton, in the coming congressional elections.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Mike McCurry, the congenial voice of the White House during some of its most tension-filled times, plans to step down as President Clinton's press secretary in the fall, Clinton announced yesterday.In his 3 1/2 years as the administration's principal spokesman, McCurry, with his trademark wit and reputation for being forthright, won high marks for improving relations with the media. At the same time, he was considered a master at putting the most favorable "spin" on potentially damaging stories such as the Monica Lewinsky scandal.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 18, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Bogged down in partisan strife, the House Judiciary Committee failed to agree yesterday on the release of President Clinton's videotaped grand jury testimony and 2,700 additional pages of evidence from independent counsel Kenneth Starr.The sharply divided committee, which would conduct any impeachment inquiry based on Starr's report, adjourned last night after nine hours of wrangling and promised to finish its work by noon today.The material could be released to the public tomorrow, "in time for the weekend talk shows," said Rep. Martin T. Meehan, a Massachusetts Democrat on the Judiciary Committee.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Signe Wilkinson despised the cartoon. The editorial cartoonist drew it in the spring, during the controversy over news leaks in the Monica Lewinsky story, spinning off that theme by picturing reporters chasing Clinton's dog, Buddy. The cartoon warned of "another White House leak" as Buddy relieved himself in the bushes. Wilkinson thought the idea was stupid, hardly befitting her paper, the Philadelphia Daily News.The day the cartoon ran she waited for the critics. Instead, her editors backslapped her and offered more praise than ever.
NEWS
By Paul West and Ellen Gamerman and Paul West and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 14, 2000
BUFFALO, N.Y. - With new polls showing the first lady edging into the lead, Hillary Rodham Clinton and her Republican rival in New York's Senate contest tangled in their first televised debate last night over the Monica Lewinsky scandal and the influence of millions of dollars worth of soft-money ads in their race. During an often testy and sometimes personal debate, Rep. Rick A. Lazio, a Republican congressman from Long Island, challenged Clinton to sign an agreement to forgo raising and spending unregulated soft money for the rest of the campaign.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr threatened Attorney General Janet Reno with a court fight yesterday if the Justice Department goes ahead with an investigation of him, or at least if it conducts the probe in a way that he does not like.He raised that prospect in a court filing at the same time that the Justice Department, in its own filing, insisted that it has full authority to investigate Starr's performance, a step it plans to take before deciding whether to fire him.The court papers seemed to escalate the tension that has been building in the weeks since Starr was formally notified that the department is planning to open a probe of allegations that he and his staff have misused their powers.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 5, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Alternately sentimental and scornful, Monica Lewinsky's biography arrived on the nation's bookshelves yesterday, painting a purple portrait of an emotional young woman, her lovelorn presidential paramour and a bloodthirsty prosecutor bent on destroying his prey.For all the hype about another blow to the Clinton presidency, "Monica's Story" plays more like the Democratic Party's version of the Lewinsky scandal than a damaging tell-all.Lewinsky does at times regard Clinton as "a selfish man who lies all the time."
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 1, 1999
WASHINGTON -- As the Monica Lewinsky scandal fades into memory, the Justice Department's pending investigation of Kenneth W. Starr has become a fight not only over legal principles but over how history books will record President Clinton's impeachment.The partisans who dueled over impeachment are taking sides over the significance of misconduct allegations leveled by the president's defenders against the independent counsel. They are hotly debating whether Attorney General Janet Reno has the authority to investigate Starr -- and, if so, how such an investigation should be conducted.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The House Republican prosecutors and White House lawyers turned the impeachment trial over to the Senate jury yesterday, after prosecutors implored senators to rise above their political interests, ignore White House "spin" and remove President Clinton from office.But Charles F. C. Ruff, the White House counsel, warned that a conviction of the president would rip a hole in the constitutional fabric that has clothed American society and will clothe future generations for "millennia to come."
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Signe Wilkinson despised the cartoon. The editorial cartoonist drew it in the spring, during the controversy over news leaks in the Monica Lewinsky story, spinning off that theme by picturing reporters chasing Clinton's dog, Buddy. The cartoon warned of "another White House leak" as Buddy relieved himself in the bushes. Wilkinson thought the idea was stupid, hardly befitting her paper, the Philadelphia Daily News.The day the cartoon ran she waited for the critics. Instead, her editors backslapped her and offered more praise than ever.
NEWS
By Susan Feeney | September 15, 1998
WASHINGTON -- As Congress weighs the fate of President Clinton, many Republicans and Democrats agree that one certain casualty is the president's moral authority.The Monica Lewinsky scandal "has, I fear, compromised his moral authority at a time when Americans of every political persuasion agree that the decline of the family is one of the most pressing problems we are facing," said Sen. Joseph Lieberman, a Connecticut Democrat."If he does survive this," said Sen. Orrin Hatch, a Utah Republican, "then certainly his moral authority is going to be weakened."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Monty Phan and Monty Phan,NEWSDAY | April 2, 2001
It might seem that Matt Drudge would have little use for a site that proclaims itself as "the single best source for facts on the Net," but there's the link, right there on the Drudge Report Web site. After all, Drudge - the Internet newshound best known for breaking the Monica Lewinsky scandal - moves so quickly to convert raw information to Web site fodder that something like the "Drudge Reference Desk" might seem incongruent. But the Drudge referred to in that link isn't Matt at all, but his father, Bob, who has worked for six years to pull together Refdesk.
NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein | December 30, 1998
AMONG conservatives it is an article of faith that Congress has to oust President Clinton to awaken a country badly in need of moral renewal. That argument has only two problems. One is that all evidence suggests that a moral renewal is already under way in America. The second is that the public response to the Monica Lewinsky scandal -- condemnation of his behavior bounded by opposition to his removal -- embodies the new social consensus that's making this renewal possible.During the House impeachment debate earlier this month, the principal Republican argument was that removing Mr. Clinton was essential to uphold "the rule of law."
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 20, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The announced resignation of House Speaker-designate Robert L. Livingston sent shock waves through Capitol Hill yesterday, forcing the nation's political establishment to confront just how dangerous a wave of sexual recrimination has become."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.