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By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | December 29, 1994
The veteran chairman of the state Senate's budget committee has decided to turn his election defeat into potentially more lucrative work, announcing yesterday that he will become a legislative lobbyist when his term ends next month.Laurence Levitan, a Montgomery County lawyer who has chaired the Budget and Taxation Committee for 16 years and who currently co-chairs Gov.-elect Parris N. Glendening's transition budget advisory committee, said he will join the law and %J lobbying firm of Rifkin, Livingston & Silver.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | August 23, 2009
A years-long fight over whether to allow a gas station/convenience store and car wash in the Waverly Woods Village Center in Woodstock is a step closer to a resolution that some residents are unhappy about. Convenience Retailing LLC co-owner Rick Levitan won a 3-1 vote by the Howard County Board of Appeals on Monday night to approve conditional zoning, opening the way for a project that scores of residents have fought against at two other nearby locations. But Levitan, who operates gas station/convenience stores in Owen Brown and Dorsey Hall village centers in Columbia, was happy.
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NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | November 1, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- State Sen. Laurence Levitan is sure he's running for public office in 1994. He's just not sure which office.So, Mr. Levitan -- a 20-year veteran of the General Assembly who, among other accomplishments, pushed through a tax checkoff for endangered species that has become jokingly known as the "chickadee checkoff" -- has come up with a personal checkoff list of his own.In a recent mass mailing, Mr. Levitan appealed to some 3,500 of his closest...
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,SUN REPORTER | February 20, 2007
An Annapolis lobbyist responsible for collecting sponsorship ticket money for the Legislative Follies defended his role in the event yesterday. Laurence Levitan, a former state legislator, said that he did not sell tickets to the March 28 event. He also said he complied with state law that prohibits lobbyists from engaging "in any charitable fundraising activity at the request of an official or employee." "No elected official has asked me to raise funds, nor have I raised any for this worthwhile charity, therefore it is clearly permissible under the law," Levitan said.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and David Conn and Laura Lippman and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 1, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland's budget crisis apparently means legislators can no longer afford a sense of humor.Yesterday, hours after a partisan Senate argued over a bill to designate a state dinosaur, Sen. Laurence Levitan, D-Montgomery, floated a proposal to make "How you doin', Hon!" the Official State Greeting.Reaction to the draft legislation indicated the possibility of a humor deficit."In addition to striking those people in a frivolous manner, it could strike some native Baltimoreans in the wrong place," said Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., D-Prince George's.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | May 6, 1994
Eight months before the next legislative session, a top lieutenant to Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. already is talking about overthrowing his boss.Sen. Laurence Levitan, chairman of the Budget and Taxation Committee, said yesterday that "it is pretty definite at this point" hTC that he will challenge Mr. Miller for the Senate presidency, one of the three most powerful jobs in Annapolis.Mr. Levitan said, however, he will not make a "fully public statement" about his intentions until he discusses the idea one more time with Mr. Miller, a fellow Democrat and longtime friend.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann Peter Hermann is a reporter for the Anne Arundel County Sun, a suburban edition of The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer used a ribbon-cuttin ceremony in Anne Arundel County yesterday to blast Sen. Laurence Levitan, D-Montgomery, for saying that the administration's bill to restructure Maryland's tax system is dead.The governor said that killing the bill could cripple already strained programs that help mentally retarded children, patients kidney dialysis machines and the homeless."I'm not in the happiest mood because I read the paper today, and there was great joy by a senator who said the governor's bill is dead," said Mr. Schaefer, who has been depressed since last year's elections and who has felt unappreciated by the voters and unable to push his most sweeping programs through the legislature.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | February 20, 1993
A Montgomery County senator thinks Baltimore should lose nearly $12 million in state funds. A Baltimore senator would like to see the city gain around $4 million.It looks like neither will get his way.And once again, the city's annual effort to get the state to pay for its state's attorney's office and Circuit Court appears unlikely to succeed in this legislative session, owing to the same old story: no money.The well-established rivalry between Baltimore and the Washington suburbs continued yesterday as Sen. Laurence Levitan, a Montgomery County Democrat, pushed a bill that would trim $11.8 million from the "disparity grant."
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 2, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The major Schaefer administration bill to raise more than $800 million a year while restructuring Maryland's taxing and revenue distribution system is almost certainly dead for the 1991 Assembly session, according to Sen. Laurence Levitan, D-Montgomery,chairman of the powerful Senate Committee on Budget and Taxation.During a hearing on the bill yesterday, Mr. Levitan said the administration's proposal was simply too complex for consideration this year."I don't think that's going to be able to be accomplished . . . this session," he said.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | July 12, 1993
In the middle of this year's legislative session, a powerful state senator lobbied the governor and two state agencies in a last-ditch effort to derail an incinerator that could take business from a company he's paid to represent.The state budget was still pending before his Budget and Taxation Committee when Sen. Laurence Levitan contacted Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the natural resources and environment departments on behalf of a law client,Browning-Ferris Industries Inc.Mr. Levitan was hoping that state officials would block a $360 million incinerator project in Montgomery County.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | February 17, 2007
Amid public concern about the coziness between lawmakers and lobbyists, a high-powered Annapolis lobbyist is involved in -- and selling sponsorship tickets to -- an annual fundraising show featuring state legislators. A letter soliciting contributions for the annual Legislative Follies directs state lawmakers and others to send checks ranging from $250 to $3,000 to the Thomas Hunter Lowe Scholarship Fund Inc. in care of Laurence Levitan. Levitan is a former state lawmaker and registered lobbyist who represents 48 clients, including the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Bank of America, the Laurel Racing Association and Pepco Holdings Inc., according to fillings with the Maryland State Ethics Commission.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | December 29, 1994
The veteran chairman of the state Senate's budget committee has decided to turn his election defeat into potentially more lucrative work, announcing yesterday that he will become a legislative lobbyist when his term ends next month.Laurence Levitan, a Montgomery County lawyer who has chaired the Budget and Taxation Committee for 16 years and who currently co-chairs Gov.-elect Parris N. Glendening's transition budget advisory committee, said he will join the law and %J lobbying firm of Rifkin, Livingston & Silver.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Robert Erlandson contributed to this article | November 10, 1994
Montgomery County voters threw their most powerful state senator -- Budget and Taxation Committee Chairman Laurence Levitan -- out of office Tuesday.Baltimore County voters did the same thing to their most powerful state delegate, ousting House Majority Leader Kenneth H. Masters.In counties across Maryland -- in Howard, Washington, Anne Arundel and elsewhere -- the Democratic power elite of the General Assembly discovered that their fancy titles and big positions in Annapolis were liabilities back home.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | September 18, 1994
Maryland's growing Republican Party is hoping November will bring it more seats than ever in the Democratic-controlled General Assembly.Republicans are watching several hot state Senate races where they could topple powerful incumbents or advance their march into rural and suburban areas."
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | May 6, 1994
Eight months before the next legislative session, a top lieutenant to Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. already is talking about overthrowing his boss.Sen. Laurence Levitan, chairman of the Budget and Taxation Committee, said yesterday that "it is pretty definite at this point" hTC that he will challenge Mr. Miller for the Senate presidency, one of the three most powerful jobs in Annapolis.Mr. Levitan said, however, he will not make a "fully public statement" about his intentions until he discusses the idea one more time with Mr. Miller, a fellow Democrat and longtime friend.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John A. Morris and John Rivera and John A. Morris,Staff Writers | October 14, 1993
Annapolis mayoral candidate Dennis M. Callahan said last night at a public debate that the chairman of the state Senate Budget and Taxation Committee has agreed to delay funding for a major expansion of the detention center.But contacted at home late last night, the chairman denied making such a promise."I never said I would do that arbitrarily myself, but it is somethingthat has to go through a process," said Sen. Laurence Levitan, a Montgomery County Democrat. "The issue has to come before the committee.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | February 17, 2007
Amid public concern about the coziness between lawmakers and lobbyists, a high-powered Annapolis lobbyist is involved in -- and selling sponsorship tickets to -- an annual fundraising show featuring state legislators. A letter soliciting contributions for the annual Legislative Follies directs state lawmakers and others to send checks ranging from $250 to $3,000 to the Thomas Hunter Lowe Scholarship Fund Inc. in care of Laurence Levitan. Levitan is a former state lawmaker and registered lobbyist who represents 48 clients, including the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Bank of America, the Laurel Racing Association and Pepco Holdings Inc., according to fillings with the Maryland State Ethics Commission.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,SUN REPORTER | February 20, 2007
An Annapolis lobbyist responsible for collecting sponsorship ticket money for the Legislative Follies defended his role in the event yesterday. Laurence Levitan, a former state legislator, said that he did not sell tickets to the March 28 event. He also said he complied with state law that prohibits lobbyists from engaging "in any charitable fundraising activity at the request of an official or employee." "No elected official has asked me to raise funds, nor have I raised any for this worthwhile charity, therefore it is clearly permissible under the law," Levitan said.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | July 12, 1993
In the middle of this year's legislative session, a powerful state senator lobbied the governor and two state agencies in a last-ditch effort to derail an incinerator that could take business from a company he's paid to represent.The state budget was still pending before his Budget and Taxation Committee when Sen. Laurence Levitan contacted Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the natural resources and environment departments on behalf of a law client,Browning-Ferris Industries Inc.Mr. Levitan was hoping that state officials would block a $360 million incinerator project in Montgomery County.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | February 20, 1993
A Montgomery County senator thinks Baltimore should lose nearly $12 million in state funds. A Baltimore senator would like to see the city gain around $4 million.It looks like neither will get his way.And once again, the city's annual effort to get the state to pay for its state's attorney's office and Circuit Court appears unlikely to succeed in this legislative session, owing to the same old story: no money.The well-established rivalry between Baltimore and the Washington suburbs continued yesterday as Sen. Laurence Levitan, a Montgomery County Democrat, pushed a bill that would trim $11.8 million from the "disparity grant."
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