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Levi Strauss

SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | October 9, 1990
OAKLAND, Calif. -- "Deep pockets!" Sandy Alderson said, his rising voice signaling amazement. He shook his head at the question, a grin growing. "Let me tell you. We don't have the highest payroll in baseball. We're not even close. I think the Red Sox have a higher payroll than we do. In fact, I don't think so. I know so."The general manager of the Oakland A's was sitting in the dugout during batting practice, wearing an Oxford blue shirt, a conservatively striped tie, dark blue slacks, wire-rim glasses, gray hair at his temples -- right out of a Brooks Brothers catalog.
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FEATURES
By Natalie Weinstein and Natalie Weinstein,Chicago Tribune | December 27, 1990
Prior to the 20th century, comfort was not an important element in the design of most clothing. Instead, people saw restriction of movement as a symbol of wealth and status. If they didn't have to work or move around a great deal, men and women felt little need for clothing that allowed it. Happily, the 20th century has seen a revolution in the ways people dress. Unlike in past periods, today's fashion experts are likely to criticize clothing that restricts movement or causes discomfort.THE BEST INNOVATIONS1.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
Clorox Corp.'s bleach-making plant in Harford County, conceived in 1990, has established itself as a corporate model because of one management philosophy that creates a near-fanatical focus on customer satisfaction and another that gives much of the responsibility for running the plant to workers on the factory floor.But when Levi Strauss & Co., the admired jeans-maker, announced plant closings and layoffs this year, it was partly because a management strategy that shifted factory workers into "teams" didn't work, leaving the company nearly defenseless against low-cost imports.
BUSINESS
By Peter Kerr and Peter Kerr,New York Times News Service | August 28, 1991
For the first time since they began arriving after World War II, the 78 million Americans of the "baby boom" are being courted by large numbers of marketers not for their seemingly endless youth but for their encroaching middle age.As the baby boomers begin to bulge, sag and squint their way into their mid-40s, companies are striking gold with products that offer a bit of youth to these aging yuppies -- a group that demographers are calling grumpies, for...
SPORTS
By SUSAN Reimer | January 28, 1991
Worth the wait?Super Bowl teams are understandably agitated before the game, and the wait until kickoff can seem endless.That was particularly true for the Bills and the Giants, who had to wait longer than any teams in past Super Bowls for their contest to begin -- 6:18 p.m. EST."I hate waiting," Giants coach Bill Parcells said, "Games should be at 1 o'clock in the afternoon."Parcells spent the time as he usually does: in the lobby of his hotel before dawn, drinking coffee with his backup quarterback, Matt Cavanaugh, and his one-time high school basketball coach, Mickey Corcoran.
NEWS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | January 29, 2006
The most striking thing inside American Apparel T-shirt shops might not be the clothes. It might be the labels that say "Made in USA." Manufacturing jobs in general, and apparel-making jobs in particular, have been moving to cheaper plants overseas for decades. But Los Angeles-based American Apparel has thrived by defying that trend. The company appeals to U.S. customers who want to be hip and don't want their clothes to carry "Made in China" labels - a tag hard to avoid these days. American Apparel avoids mainstream malls, models and press, and offers good pay and benefits to workers who churn out 210,000 basic T-shirts a day for adults, kids and dogs, and sells its clothing online and in 57 global stores.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | November 4, 2009
CLAUDE LEVI-STRAUSS, 100 Pre-eminent social anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss, one of the pre-eminent social anthropologists of the 20th century, whose erudite, often mind-bendingly labored studies of indigenous Brazilian tribes led to influential theories examining human behavior and culture, died over the weekend in Paris. No cause of death was reported. Dr. Levi-Strauss was often paired with writers Jean-Paul Sartre and Andre Malraux as the towering French intellectuals of the past century.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1996
Streets of gold: Midtown Manhattan still glitters with the world's most expensive rents, a new survey reports. On Fifth Avenue between 49th Street and 57th Street, which boasts jewelers Cartier and Tiffany & Co. and the Trump Tower, space rented last year for $500 a square foot, according to Hirschfeld Group Inc., a retail real estate advisory firm. Second place? 57th Street between Fifth and Madison avenues, home to a Levi Strauss superstore and Warner Brothers Studio Store, with rents at $440 a square foot.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2000
In the Region Hanger bid to sell Seattle unit fails for lack of financing Hanger Orthopedic Group Inc. of Bethesda says a deal to sell its Seattle manufacturing division has fallen through. Hanger had said last month that it would sell Seattle Orthopedic Group to Otto Bock Orthopedic Industry Inc. for about $75 million. The buyer, which also manufactures orthopedic devices, could not get financing on acceptable terms, Hanger said, adding that it now expects to keep the Seattle unit. In addition to its manufacturing, Hanger operates 627 centers in 44 states to fit patients for braces and artificial limbs.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1996
When money can't talk: If a company can't afford to give its workers raises, there are other ways to motivate them, says George S. May International Co., a management consultant. Positive feedback given in person and flexibility in meeting employee needs, such as a different schedule for a new parent, are two ways, Mr. May said. So are stock options for a long-time staffer. Mr. May also suggests a boss ask employees' opinions on ways to improve the company.Dress down: More companies are accepting the idea of casual dress, finds the Society for Human Resource Management.
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