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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 1999
Levi Strauss & Co., an icon of American culture, announced yesterday that it would close half of its manufacturing plants in the United States and Canada and lay off 5,900 employees, or 30 percent of its North American work force. The embattled jeans maker, whose sales declined 13 percent last year, to $6 billion, said the move would allow it to compete more effectively with rivals who largely make their products overseas and to concentrate on improving the marketing of its jeans, which have been losing favor among younger consumers in recent years.
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NEWS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | January 29, 2006
The most striking thing inside American Apparel T-shirt shops might not be the clothes. It might be the labels that say "Made in USA." Manufacturing jobs in general, and apparel-making jobs in particular, have been moving to cheaper plants overseas for decades. But Los Angeles-based American Apparel has thrived by defying that trend. The company appeals to U.S. customers who want to be hip and don't want their clothes to carry "Made in China" labels - a tag hard to avoid these days. American Apparel avoids mainstream malls, models and press, and offers good pay and benefits to workers who churn out 210,000 basic T-shirts a day for adults, kids and dogs, and sells its clothing online and in 57 global stores.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 2003
SAN ANTONIO -- Clara Flores once thought she had the job of a lifetime, even, perhaps, the most solid job in America. She made blue jeans. Not just any blue jeans. Levi's. "It was the original," Flores said. "Wherever you went, it was the same Levi's blue jeans." The $4.2 billion company, founded 150 years ago by Levi Strauss, a Bavarian immigrant who settled in San Francisco to outfit the gold miners, has turned out more than 3.5 billion pairs of the sturdy denim jeans with their trademark rivets at the seams and little red pocket tab, becoming an American icon right up there with Coca-Cola, Hollywood, the Colt .45 and baseball.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 2003
SAN ANTONIO -- Clara Flores once thought she had the job of a lifetime, even, perhaps, the most solid job in America. She made blue jeans. Not just any blue jeans. Levi's. "It was the original," Flores said. "Wherever you went, it was the same Levi's blue jeans." The $4.2 billion company, founded 150 years ago by Levi Strauss, a Bavarian immigrant who settled in San Francisco to outfit the gold miners, has turned out more than 3.5 billion pairs of the sturdy denim jeans with their trademark rivets at the seams and little red pocket tab, becoming an American icon right up there with Coca-Cola, Hollywood, the Colt .45 and baseball.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen,Solis-Cohen Enterprises | March 8, 1992
"George Bush went to Japan to sell cars, but he would have done better if had gone to sell jeans," claims Danny Eskenazi, who sells vintage denim from his Seattle shop called Jack Hammer and by phone at (800) BUY-501S. His best customers are Japanese."Japanese tourists come here and buy never-worn jeans from the 1950s and '60s," he said. "They cost $200 to $400 a pair." In Japan, vintage denim pants have sold for more than $1,000 and denim jackets for over $2,000. Vintage denim means made before 1971.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 4, 1997
NEW YORK -- Levi Strauss and Co. announced a drastic cutback yesterday to eliminate a third of its American manufacturing jobs. But in an extraordinary gesture of largess, the jeans maker coupled the bad news with a generous severance package that included extended benefits and even cash rewards for employees who find other work.The retrenchment, which will close 11 factories in four states, reflected some of the same global cost pressures that have led other domestic manufacturers making mass-market products to reduce their reliance on American workers.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 9, 2002
SAN FRANCISCO - Levi Strauss & Co., whose sales are falling for a sixth year, will fire 3,600 people and close six U.S. plants as the jeans maker shifts production to lower-wage countries such as Mexico. "It's a painful but necessary business decision done for competitive reasons," said William B. Chiasson, Levi's chief financial officer. The job cuts equal 22 percent of Levi's work force. Three factories in Texas and one each in Georgia, California and Tennessee will be shut, and 3,300 positions eliminated, Levi said.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | June 24, 1996
LEVI STRAUSS & Co.'s new employee bonus plan seems a salve for the sores of a downsized economy.This month Levi promised an extra year's pay to each of its 37,500 employees if the company hits its profit targets by November 2001. The scheme could cost the jeans maker $750 million, and 2,000 Levi Strauss workers cheered its announcement outside the company's San Francisco headquarters."Motivated employees are our source of innovation and competitive advantage," Chairman Robert D. Haas told the crowd.
FEATURES
By Glenn Rifkin and Glenn Rifkin,New York Times News Service | November 9, 1994
New York--Weaving together two basic threads of American life -- creeping computerization and the quest for a perfect fit in blue jeans -- the world's biggest jeans maker has begun selling made-to-order Levi's for women.Sales clerks at an Original Levi's Store can use a personal computer and the customer's vital statistics to create what amounts to a digital blue jeans blueprint. When transmitted electronically to a Levi's factory in Tennessee, this computer file instructs a robotic tailor to cut a bolt of denim to the woman's measurements.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Lowe and Jennifer Lowe,Orange County Register | September 7, 1995
One leg in, one leg out. Pull and tug and frown in the mirror. Jump, scooch, strain to button. Oh my, jeans manufacturers are giving us fits.The average woman tries on 10 pairs of jeans to find the right one, according to the Lee Apparel Co.And with the flood of fits on the market these days, that number is sure to rise.Jeans manufacturers have gone crazy. So much for basic shrink-to-fits. Designers have narrowed legs, widened waists, loosened hips, relaxed backsides. They've sandblasted, stonewashed, antiqued and overdyed denim.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christian Hettinger | June 12, 2003
Historic jeans Denim devotees take heed. The Levi's Store at Tyson's Corner Center in McLean, Va., marks the first stop of Levi Strauss & Co.'s World Archive Tour, a traveling collection of the company's rare denim artifacts. The collection, spanning the company's 150-year history, boasts the pair of jeans believed to be the oldest in existence, the Nevada jeans, which date to the 1880s. Other top draws include a denim tuxedo specially tailored for Bing Crosby in the 1950s, and an assemblage of 19th-century catalogs and print advertisements.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 9, 2002
SAN FRANCISCO - Levi Strauss & Co., whose sales are falling for a sixth year, will fire 3,600 people and close six U.S. plants as the jeans maker shifts production to lower-wage countries such as Mexico. "It's a painful but necessary business decision done for competitive reasons," said William B. Chiasson, Levi's chief financial officer. The job cuts equal 22 percent of Levi's work force. Three factories in Texas and one each in Georgia, California and Tennessee will be shut, and 3,300 positions eliminated, Levi said.
NEWS
By Daryl Lease | March 8, 2000
FAR BE IT from me to offer advice to Alan Greenspan on how to keep the economy humming, but I think the fellow ought to quit fretting over inflation and pay a little more attention to my feet. As silly as that may sound, I can say with confidence that my toes (and fingers) have saved me from economic ruin on numerous occasions as I've struggled to balance my checkbook. I believe my piggies can be of a similar service to the Federal Reserve Board. Here's why. Our country is, I'm sad to report, on the verge of a major battle for the heart and mind -- not to mention the feet, neck, butt and belly -- of the American male.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
Clorox Corp.'s bleach-making plant in Harford County, conceived in 1990, has established itself as a corporate model because of one management philosophy that creates a near-fanatical focus on customer satisfaction and another that gives much of the responsibility for running the plant to workers on the factory floor.But when Levi Strauss & Co., the admired jeans-maker, announced plant closings and layoffs this year, it was partly because a management strategy that shifted factory workers into "teams" didn't work, leaving the company nearly defenseless against low-cost imports.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1999
In an increasingly competitive jeans market, Baltimore-based sportswear maker I. C. Isaacs & Co. Inc. reported a first-quarter net loss yesterday of $2.9 million, or 42 cents per share, compared with net income of $700,000, or 9 cents per share, posted for the first quarter of 1998.The company said sales of Marithe and Francois Girbaud brands were strong, at $3.4 million in the quarter that ended March 31, compared with $4.7 million during all of last year. But sales of the BOSS and Beverly Hills Polo Club lines were $14.5 million less than last year's first quarter.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN COLUMNIST | February 26, 1999
I remember feeling a stabbing pain not long ago when I asked my 16-year-old why he never wore blue jeans and he brought up the Dork Factor.Say what?"They look dorky," he said. "At least, no offense, the kind you wear."Dorky? James Dean wore blue jeans like these, pal, and he was the coolest guy on the planet. Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper wore blue jeans in "Easy Rider," the coolest movie of its time.Springsteen -- the Boss! -- wears blue jeans. Even Mark McGwire -- the home run king with the bridge pier arms!
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | August 18, 1993
Levi Strauss & Co., purveyors of rough and ready blue jeans to ranch hands and movie stars alike, is on yet another fashion trail. The company introduced Dockers twill pants in 1986, and the casual line turned into the fastest growing apparel label in history. Dress Dockers, a dressier line, was introduced last year with growing success. Now the new Dockers Authentics aim to put men into a style that falls somewhere between the two, dressier than the original Dockers, but not quite so crisp and pressed as Dress Dockers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 23, 1999
Levi Strauss & Co., an icon of American culture, announced yesterday that it would close half of its manufacturing plants in the United States and Canada and lay off 5,900 employees, or 30 percent of its North American work force. The embattled jeans maker, whose sales declined 13 percent last year, to $6 billion, said the move would allow it to compete more effectively with rivals who largely make their products overseas and to concentrate on improving the marketing of its jeans, which have been losing favor among younger consumers in recent years.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1998
Khakis are back!That's the news in the rag trade these days. Khakis rock! Khakis are meaner than jeans. Bogie wore khakis, Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire. Who didn't?But they're all dead, aren't they? Doesn't anybody retire? Astaire's been dead for 11 years, and still sells vacuum cleaners on television.Recruiting the dead into your marketing plans seems to work. At least you don't get any back talk from the talent.With that in mind, surely, The GAP has resurrected Louis Prima, famous band leader, to sell khakis.
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