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BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | September 19, 1990
Every day, in an industrial park in Owings Mills, workers violently shake bottles of Snuggle fabric softener, drop boxes of Wisk detergent until they burst, and generally make life miserable for a variety of Lever Brothers Co. products.The aim is not industrial terrorism, but rather a multimillion-dollar effort by the giant household products maker to find better, cheaper and more environmentally sound ways of packaging its goods.Lever Brothers' Packaging Development Center, which opened in January and was dedicated yesterday, is a 32,000-square-foot facility for the design and testing of new packages.
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TRAVEL
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
On a recent Friday night, Hollywood Casino in Perryville whooped, shrieked and fluttered with the shrill din of thousands of slot machines at full blast. Crowds flitted from shiny penny slots to $1 machines, hoping to hit it big, or simply spend a night away from the couch. The cavernous complex in the middle of rural Cecil County felt like the inside of a pinball machine. Walking around this casino, Maryland's largest, and the Casino at Ocean Downs, the state's second, can be a dizzying, trippy experience.
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NEWS
August 22, 2002
Lawrence Subotich, a retired Lever Bros. mechanic and recreation council official, died Aug. 15 from Parkinson's disease at his Parkville home. He was 79. Mr. Subotich, who lived on Wendover Road for more than 40 years, was born and raised in Perth Amboy, N.J., and moved to Baltimore after his high school graduation. He went to work in the early 1960s as a mechanic at the Lever Bros. plant in Dundalk, from which he retired in 1985. A sports fan, Mr. Subotich was a moderator, referee and coach for a variety of teams in Parkville recreation leagues for many years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2010
Laura L. Levering, a homemaker and traveler, died Sept. 27 of respiratory failure at her daughter's home in The Plains, Va. She was 87. Laura Louise La Montagne, the daughter of a wine importer and a homemaker, was born in New York City. She later moved to Guilford with her family. She attended Greenwood School and graduated in 1940 from the Convent of the Sacred Heart School in Greenwich, Conn. She later made her debut at the Bachelors Cotillon. In 1957, she married J.P. Wade Levering, who was president and chief executive of National Sash Weight Corp.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | September 19, 1990
Time was, the best thing about plastic laundry soap bottles was that nothing happened to them. They didn't break when dropped. The detergents inside didn't dissolve them. They lasted forever.Nowadays, though, the worst thing about those plastic laundry bottles is that nothing happens to them. Long after they have been emptied and discarded, they endure.As a result, at least three area plastics and detergent companies have begun looking for ways to make the cheap and colorful packaging a little friendlier to the environment.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 19, 2003
A man's conviction for child abuse because he fathered a baby with his teen-age foster daughter has been erased by an Anne Arundel County judge. Circuit Judge Joseph P. Manck reversed his decision to convict Samuel Curtis Lever Jr., formerly of Glen Burnie, writing that prosecutors failed to prove that he molested or exploited the girl, who was then 16. Both sides had agreed that the sexual activity was consensual. "A conviction cannot be substantiated on the sexual offenses listed in the statute, as the evidence states the sexual contact was with consent of the victim," Manck wrote.
NEWS
By Nora Zamichow and Nora Zamichow,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 1, 2003
LOS ANGELES - As Annie Lever pads along a sun-scorched trail in the Hollywood Hills, a white Labrador, a Gordon setter and a golden retriever sprint ahead. A 5-pound Maltese dashes in the dust by Lever's sneakers, and two chocolate Labradors and a pit bull mix plod behind. "Are they all yours?" one hiker asks. Not exactly. Lever, 46, is a professional dog walker who earns $150,000 a year - enough to buy a Brentwood condominium, decorated in tones of taupe, green and cream, and a Steinway piano.
NEWS
January 1, 1997
In an article yesterday about Cabbage Patch Snacktime Kids, the Associated Press incorrectly explained how removing the doll's backpack stops its chewing action.Removing the backpack prevents it from pressing against a lever on the doll's back. When that lever is deactivated, the chewing motion stops. The toy's batteries are not stored in the backpack.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 1/01/97
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2003
Piles of Playskool toys and a booster seat in primary colors sit in the dining room of Nicole Lever's home in Glen Burnie. But a toddler hasn't used them since August. The foster child who lived there for nearly 17 months was taken from the home by county social services officials while he watched Sesame Street, after genetic tests showed that Lever's then-husband had fathered a child by the couple's other foster child, a teen-age girl. And while Lever was not implicated - her former husband has since been convicted of child abuse and left the state - she remains frustrated in her attempt to adopt the toddler.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Sun Staff Writer | September 13, 1994
Forty years ago, when he was 18 and fresh from Patterson High School, Gene M. Raynor began his first full-time job -- as a clerk in the offices of the Baltimore Board of Supervisors of Elections. He already was a political veteran, having begun as a campaign volunteer at 15.Mr. Raynor held a variety of election board jobs, and in 1979 was named head of the city operation. There, he tended to all the fine points of the vote: the registration of voters, the storing of machines, the processing of candidates' financial reports, the monitoring of election-day complaints.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,gmarksjarvis@tribune.com | September 14, 2008
You know the problem well. The housing market's a mess. So banks and brokers that were involved in mortgages are a mess. As a result, consumers and businesses are having trouble borrowing money, and economies worldwide are slowing. Individual investors can become whipsawed as optimistic analysts tell them to start buying stocks while others urge caution. That's why I was intrigued by a simple list a new team at Standard & Poor's has put together. They have analyzed hundreds of factors that are tangled together to influence the economy and housing, and came up with a list of four "levers" that investors can examine for signs the tide might be turning in housing.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Tribune Media Services | June 29, 2008
From 50,000 feet, your retirement doesn't look so good. Bearish financial markets, gloomy long-term projections for stocks, a sputtering economy - and that's just the big picture. Down at eye level - where you actually have some control over your finances - things aren't much better with milk and gasoline at $4 a gallon. But making the most of what you can control about your retirement finances can make a substantial impact, experts say. "Investors have at least four levers: how much they withdraw, how they allocate their portfolio, when they actually begin retirement and when they start taking Social Security," said Christine Fahlund, senior financial planner for T. Rowe Price Group.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | February 14, 2008
WASHINGTON -- When she launched her first campaign against Rep. Albert R. Wynn two years ago, Donna Edwards was a liberal activist little known outside progressive circles. Wynn, a veteran of more than two decades in Annapolis and Washington, raised more than twice as much money as Edwards and enjoyed the support of the Maryland political establishment. But Edwards began a drumbeat of criticism against Wynn's votes on bankruptcy, the estate tax and the war in Iraq - and came within a few thousand votes of beating him in the Democratic primary election for the 4th Congressional District.
FEATURES
By Mary Beckman | January 3, 2008
It's the time of year when people resolve to make changes in their lives. And we probably all know someone -- it might even be ourselves -- who vowed to quit smoking. We also all know someone who stopped for a few days then lit back up. Here's a closer look at one of the most difficult resolutions to keep: "I vow to quit smoking." According to a 2006 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 41 percent of smokers try to quit at least once during the year. But only about 10 percent actually succeed.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | June 6, 2007
Spot checks by state inspectors found that Baltimore school employees falsely reported making promised building repairs and permitted shoddy work on multiple renovation projects, according to confidential documents obtained by The Sun. The inspectors found new windows that were cut to the wrong size, leaving gaps at the top, and new doors installed in rusty old frames although new frames had been paid for.
NEWS
May 26, 2007
On May 23, 2007 FRANCES G. LILLEY (nee Morris) beloved wife of the late William N. Lilley; devoted mother of Danny Wilson, Juanita Cox, Deborah Parrott and Connie Asbury. Also survived by seven grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren; granddaughter of and raised by the late Annie B. Kennedy. Mrs. Lilley was retired after 33 years of service with Lever Bros. Funeral Services will be held at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, Inc., 7922 Wise Ave. on Monday at 11 a.m. Interment Gardens of Faith Cemetery.
NEWS
May 8, 2005
On Thursday, May 5, 2005, CHARLES E. GANNON, age 77, of Ocean City, MD, formerly of Baltimore; beloved father of Delores Gannon of Joppa and Edward Charles Gannon of Edgewood; grandfather of Rodney Edward Lang of Joppa. Mr. Gannon worked in security for many years with Lever Brothers and also in security in Ocean City. He was a World War II Marine Veteran. Cremation followed his death. Memorial services will follow later. Arrangements by the Burbage Funeral Home, Berlin, MD.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Leading governments of Europe, mounting a new campaign to push Paul D. Wolfowitz from his job as World Bank president, signaled yesterday that they were willing to let the United States choose the bank's next chief, but only if Wolfowitz stepped down soon, European officials said. European officials have indicated they want to end the tradition of the U.S. picking the World Bank leader. But now the officials are hoping to enlist American help in persuading Wolfowitz to resign voluntarily, rather than be rebuked or ousted.
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