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NEWS
May 5, 2012
How refreshing to read about the popularity of salad bars ("Salad bars take root," May 1) and enjoy the pictures of young women filling their school lunch plates with colorful fresh vegetables! What a treat that certain schools are providing and promoting this choice in the food desert areas where wholesome and low-calorie fresh foods have generally not been available. I'd look forward to a follow-up a year from now about the health and weight of these girls. Judy Chernak, Pikesville
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NEWS
May 5, 2012
How refreshing to read about the popularity of salad bars ("Salad bars take root," May 1) and enjoy the pictures of young women filling their school lunch plates with colorful fresh vegetables! What a treat that certain schools are providing and promoting this choice in the food desert areas where wholesome and low-calorie fresh foods have generally not been available. I'd look forward to a follow-up a year from now about the health and weight of these girls. Judy Chernak, Pikesville
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FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | June 11, 1997
IT HAS BEEN A GOOD year for lettuce. The cool, rainy weather may have made some swimmers shiver and some spirits droop, but the leafy crops have loved it. They are thriving.I would like to report that my garden has rows of various kinds of lettuce. I did buy a multitude of lettuce seeds. But for a multitude of reasons -- mainly poor planning -- the seeds remained in their packets, and the lettuce crop remained largely theoretical.However, I was able to harvest a little lettuce this weekend.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | August 3, 2011
Whether you're craving seafood or steak, Pelican Cove Seafood Bar and Grill Restaurant in Abingdon has a diverse menu with items such as fresh oysters and mussels, Porter House steak and Key Largo Seafood Marinara, served with lump crabmeat, sautéed shrimp and scallops. “Our fresh rock fish is our number-one entrée,” says Jay Mottley, general manager of Pelican Cove. Guests can order the fish blackened, baked or char-grilled. “The food quality speaks for itself. This is not a chain restaurant.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 2, 2004
LETTUCE, LIKE kids and dogs, becomes interesting when you raise your own. Mundane. Ordinary. Ho-hum. That is how I felt about lettuce until recently. Then the seeds I had planted on a rainy April morning sprang to fruition last month. Before I could say Black Seeded Simpson, I was transformed from a guy who mindlessly munched his way through his salad to a guy who now found nuance in each forkful of greens. Pretty scary stuff and, I admit, it sounds pretty wussy. Real men, I learned long ago in some locker room, are not supposed to love lettuce, unless it is stuffed in a sandwich.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | March 4, 2001
DAYS BEFORE the Great Chefs Dinner, a glittering extravaganza held this week at the Center Club, the Dover sole was in doubt and the lettuce appeared to be lost. When Lynn Kennedy-Tilyou, the chef at Antrim 1844 Country Inn, who was in charge of the meal, first went in search of sole, the news was not good. She was told that the area of the Baltic Sea where the sole were supposed to be swimming was temporarily closed to fishing. In the chef's plan, the fish was going to be her first course, a roulade of Dover sole stuffed with a roasted pepper and scallops mousseline.
FEATURES
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 2000
In this part of the country, our salad days -- our heyday, our days of youthful exuberance -- are in the spring, before summer heat turns arugula peppery and crisphead lettuces bolt and go to seed. Whether you sowed a row of lettuce seed when the ground was still cool, or buy a bag of mixed greens at a farm stand, or graze through the green bundles under the sprinkler in your supermarket, salad greens should be bright and fresh. Look for lettuces that are crisp and free of tears and browning leaves.
NEWS
By Miguel Bustillo and Miguel Bustillo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2003
A laboratory test of 22 types of lettuce bought at Northern California supermarkets found that four were contaminated with perchlorate, a toxic rocket-fuel ingredient that has polluted the Colorado River, the source of the water used to grow most of the nation's winter vegetables. The environmental group that paid for the testing by Texas Tech University conceded that the sample was far too small to draw any definite conclusions about how much perchlorate is in the lettuce Americans eat. But the organization, the Environmental Working Group, said the results were alarming enough to warrant a broad examination by the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
By John Kessler and John Kessler,Cox News Service | February 28, 1999
ATLANTA -- Being a salad snob used to be so easy. Romaine was good. Radicchio was good. Mixed baby greens were the height of sophistication.And iceberg was the pits. If you made the faux pas of professing a taste for head lettuce, it was like saying you craved Bac-O-Bits or preferred crunchy tomatoes over vine-ripened.But now people who consider themselves sophisticated indeed are taking knife and fork to iceberg with renewed gusto."It's a retro thing," says restaurant consultant John Imbergamo.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | February 27, 2000
When the cost of lettuce soars, salad-making can be a tossup. One solution is to enliven the salad course with some inexpensive, nutritious ingredients that often get relegated to side-dish status: rice and other grains. Combined with fresh seasonal vegetables and assertive dressings and seasonings, cooked grains bring new tastes and textures to salads. Styled after a classic Salade Nicoise, this salad combines rice and a few fresh vegetables with marinated artichokes, anchovies, olives and other robust flavors reminiscent of the French Riviera.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | June 8, 2010
It happens every June: the invasion of the salad greens. Those little seeds that seemed so inconsequential back in April when you scattered them on the moist garden ground have now come to life, and with a vengeance. This year the combination of abundant moisture and relatively cool days have produced lush crops of lettuce and other greens. Even if you don't grow your own, the mounds of lettuce and its verdant relatives that appear at area farmers markets are signs that is a good season for salads.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 28, 2008
It was a salad that got started by mistake. I was in the garden, weeding between the shallots, when the blade from the weeding tool accidentally nicked a shallot. It was an inadvertent harvest. This happens more often than I care to admit. I will be puttering around and I uproot something or step on some promising crop. It is a part of gardening, and I have learned to salvage dishes from these unwitting moves. The other day, for instance, the suddenly harvested shallot became part of the dressing for a salad.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 30, 2008
Inspired by Earth Day, I biked to my community garden plot and searched for something leafy to put on the dinner table. I did not find much in my garden but I turned green with envy when I saw my neighbors' plots. Other people's peas had popped out of the soil. Mine were still buried, as dormant as a hibernating bear. It was a similar story with lettuce. As I stood in my garden, I could see lettuce to the left of me, lettuce to the right of me. Little green rows, as straight as the ranks of soldiers, were rising to greet the sun. Meanwhile, most of the ground that I had seeded had the unpromising look of a paved parking lot. I coveted my neighbors' gardens.
NEWS
By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,Los Angeles Times | May 13, 2007
The sun moves over the Saturday Pico farmers' market in Santa Monica, Calif., filtering through the canopy that protects the delicate herbs and baby lettuces at the Kenter Canyon Farms stall. The salad of market lettuces that we take for granted on the menu these days, an edible bouquet that tastes as good as it looks, effectively began in owner Andrea Crawford's garden. To be more accurate, Alice Waters' garden. Twenty-six years ago, Crawford began growing lettuces and herbs for Chez Panisse, literally in Waters' backyard.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | March 14, 2007
When it comes to burgers, ground turkey offers the best of both worlds - that grilled taste with a more healthful profile. We like ours slightly charred and loaded with turkey flavor. We tried four turkey burgers from area bars and restaurants. When given the option, we asked for lettuce, tomato and onion. Here are the results. Della Rose's 8153 A Honeygo Blvd., White Marsh -- 410-933-8861 Hours --11 a.m.-2 a.m. daily Restaurant's estimate --10-15 minutes Ready in --18 minutes Served on a kaiser roll, this burger, $7.62, could have used more seasoning.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | August 30, 2006
Beef Bowl, She Made 1022 Light St., Baltimore -- 410-244-8867 Hours --10 a.m.-9 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 10 a.m.- 10 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays BEST BITE Our favorite dish was the Pork Bowl, $6.29. Small chunks of marinated pork and chopped onions lay on a sizable mound of soft white rice. The pork was dotted with hot pepper paste, which gave it a delicious kick. In our book, a little spice is always nice. ALSO TASTED The meat in the Beef Bowl, $6.29, was seasoned with sesame oil and sugar instead of hot pepper, which made it sweeter, less spicy and a little greasier than the pork.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | June 4, 1997
A is for ababai, and F is for fruitThe taste is something like canned fruit cocktail, so you'll definitely want to spice it up. But ababai (ABBA-buy) fruit, an exotic new import from Chile, has a fabulous springy texture and is loaded with vitamins. You won't find fresh ababai, but look for jars of whole fruit or marmalade in specialty food stores. For more information, call 206-938-8778.'From the Garden'Tonight's the night for "From the Garden," a party to benefit the Women's Housing Coalition, from 6: 30 to 9: 30. There'll be demonstrations by local women chefs, wine tastings and a silent auction.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 28, 2008
It was a salad that got started by mistake. I was in the garden, weeding between the shallots, when the blade from the weeding tool accidentally nicked a shallot. It was an inadvertent harvest. This happens more often than I care to admit. I will be puttering around and I uproot something or step on some promising crop. It is a part of gardening, and I have learned to salvage dishes from these unwitting moves. The other day, for instance, the suddenly harvested shallot became part of the dressing for a salad.
NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS and ROBIN MATHER JENKINS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 19, 2006
The zingy fresh flavors of Thai cuisine really fascinate me, but I've hesitated a little about cooking Thai at home, thinking it was too complicated. Then I saw several recipes for laab - sometimes spelled larb, laap or lob - and realized I could easily make one of the first Thai dishes I ever tasted. My chicken version is really speedy, and it's low in fat. While it's often served with steamed sticky rice, I usually eat it as a casual wrap using Boston lettuce leaves. The contrast of spicy chicken and cool mint and lime, slightly chewy chicken and tender greens never fails to please me. Robin Mather Jenkins writes for the Chicago Tribune, which supplied the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | March 26, 2006
A lettuce in every pot. It is a practical -- and pretty -- early spring planting idea for gardeners in a hurry to get their hands dirty. "It is the perfect choice," said gardener Edward Smith, author of Incredible Vegetables from Self-Watering Containers (Storey, 2006, $19.95). "Lettuce is a cold-tolerant plant that can take even a few degrees of frost," he said. "The seeds germinate much better in cold weather. They are programmed that way." Container vegetable gardening has taken off since the introduction of large but lightweight pots made of synthetic materials, self-watering containers, and hybridized vegetables created for cramped quarters.
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