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Letters To Santa

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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1999
Please, Dear Santa, try to remember that Caitlyn Starin still lives in Maryland and not New York."So don't forget to look for me here," she writes. "It's been a long time since last Christmas."Santa should look on Brady Avenue in Baltimore for the bright-eyed girl smiling a big, wide smile in the self-portrait Caitlyn drew. She'd like a Sleeping Beauty Barbie and Prince Ken doll for Christmas this year."Even when I'm mad, bad or glad, I'm still a good girl," Caitlyn assures Santa. "And my Mommy always loves me."
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1999
Please, Dear Santa, try to remember that Caitlyn Starin still lives in Maryland and not New York."So don't forget to look for me here," she writes. "It's been a long time since last Christmas."Santa should look on Brady Avenue in Baltimore for the bright-eyed girl smiling a big, wide smile in the self-portrait Caitlyn drew. She'd like a Sleeping Beauty Barbie and Prince Ken doll for Christmas this year."Even when I'm mad, bad or glad, I'm still a good girl," Caitlyn assures Santa. "And my Mommy always loves me."
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By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
SCHENECTADY, N.Y. -- Forget Beverly Hills 90210. The cool ZIP code for kids is North Pole 12345.Actually, the 12345 ZIP is exclusively assigned to a sprawling General Electric plant in Schenectady. But come December, the GE mailroom brims with letters addressed to Candy Lane or Iceberg Drive or Chillyville, North Pole. They all carry urgent messages for Santa Claus, and they all carry that child-friendly ZIP code."Whatever it is, they seem to write 12345," said Linda Susi, one of more than a dozen GE employees who sat down yesterday to spend a long lunch helping harried ol' St. Nick keep up with his correspondence.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
SCHENECTADY, N.Y. -- Forget Beverly Hills 90210. The cool ZIP code for kids is North Pole 12345.Actually, the 12345 ZIP is exclusively assigned to a sprawling General Electric plant in Schenectady. But come December, the GE mailroom brims with letters addressed to Candy Lane or Iceberg Drive or Chillyville, North Pole. They all carry urgent messages for Santa Claus, and they all carry that child-friendly ZIP code."Whatever it is, they seem to write 12345," said Linda Susi, one of more than a dozen GE employees who sat down yesterday to spend a long lunch helping harried ol' St. Nick keep up with his correspondence.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 2, 1998
SANTA CLAUS, Ind. -- In this small Spencer County town, letters to Santa are a common sight.They come in a host of languages from all corners of the globe. The letters filter in like stray snowflakes, year round. But as the Christmas season approaches, the light flurry turns into a storm, with hundreds of letters pouring daily into the town post office.And every year, a group of volunteers works tirelessly to make sure every letter is answered.For the members of Santa's Elves Inc., the holiday season is a busy time as the group works to read and answer the 10,000 or so letters to Santa every year.
FEATURES
By Pat Hanna Kuehl and Pat Hanna Kuehl,Special to The Sun | December 18, 1994
So you've been sending those letters to Santa Claus to the North Pole. Ho! Ho! Ho! Maybe that's why you didn't get what you wanted for Christmas.According to the Finnish Tourist Board, Santa's official address is Arctic Circle, 96930 Rovaniemi, Finland, on the Arctic Circle in an upscale artisan center and entertainment park within sneezing distance of Rovaniemi, capital of Finnish Lapland. Remote as it is, it draws visitors from Asia and North and South America as well as from all over Europe.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 4, 1998
In the old days, when addresses had numbers and streets instead of dots and slashes, kids wrote their letters to Santa using pencil, paper, an envelope and a stamp.They addressed the missives to the North Pole and then just waited. Only on Christmas morning would we know for sure if Santa got the letters.Nowadays, kids type a note to Santa, send it via e-mail and get a reply from the jolly fellow himself. The kids log onto Email Santa at http: //www.emailsanta.com/. They read the form letter and then fill in the blanks.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1997
In downtown Baltimore, the third floor of the U.S. Post Office is decked out in festive gray for the holidays. Gray walls, gray floors, one gray elevator, a few gray expressions. And behind one gray door, colorful life stories pour out.Each year, the post office receives more than a thousand letters addressed to Santa, and each year, the post office sends back "Santa" replies. But among all those children's letters are serious appeals from adults. Postal employees deliver donated gifts, food and clothing to some of them, about 150 families this year.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff writer | December 24, 1991
Although parents may be worried about the recession and how they'll pay the bills, their children don't seem too concerned -- if their letters to Santa are any indication.Some youngsters in North Countyhave asked for as many as 30 toys this year. One boy from Glen Burnie had an itemized list of 36 for Santa.For the third year, volunteers from the Glen Burnie Improvement Association have posted a festive mailbox for Santa's letters outside the association's offices on Crain Highway.Volunteers help Santa by opening the mail and getting it ready for him, said Barbara Moeller, Christmas activities chairwoman.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1995
Young Charles of Baltimore mailed Santa something unusually festive this year. In his letter to Santa, the boy enclosed drawings of six, anatomically gifted females. Dear Santa, can you make these girls into dolls? Then give them to me. Tank you, Charles."It's a new world," says Pat Mank, shaking her head.Charles' letter went into the heap in Ms. Mank's office at the main post office in downtown Baltimore. Letters to Santa are piled here every year, on this very table, next to the "Women on Stamps" video cassettes and "Postal Guide to U.S. Stamps" books, which could make exciting stocking stuffers.
FEATURES
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 4, 1998
In the old days, when addresses had numbers and streets instead of dots and slashes, kids wrote their letters to Santa using pencil, paper, an envelope and a stamp.They addressed the missives to the North Pole and then just waited. Only on Christmas morning would we know for sure if Santa got the letters.Nowadays, kids type a note to Santa, send it via e-mail and get a reply from the jolly fellow himself. The kids log onto Email Santa at http: //www.emailsanta.com/. They read the form letter and then fill in the blanks.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 2, 1998
SANTA CLAUS, Ind. -- In this small Spencer County town, letters to Santa are a common sight.They come in a host of languages from all corners of the globe. The letters filter in like stray snowflakes, year round. But as the Christmas season approaches, the light flurry turns into a storm, with hundreds of letters pouring daily into the town post office.And every year, a group of volunteers works tirelessly to make sure every letter is answered.For the members of Santa's Elves Inc., the holiday season is a busy time as the group works to read and answer the 10,000 or so letters to Santa every year.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1997
In downtown Baltimore, the third floor of the U.S. Post Office is decked out in festive gray for the holidays. Gray walls, gray floors, one gray elevator, a few gray expressions. And behind one gray door, colorful life stories pour out.Each year, the post office receives more than a thousand letters addressed to Santa, and each year, the post office sends back "Santa" replies. But among all those children's letters are serious appeals from adults. Postal employees deliver donated gifts, food and clothing to some of them, about 150 families this year.
NEWS
By Bonita Formwalt and Bonita Formwalt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 3, 1997
THE CHRISTMAS season officially begins in Glen Burnie at 7 o'clock tonight with the lighting of the Christmas tree at Logo Park at Ritchie Highway and Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard.Santa Claus will join members of the Glen Burnie Improvement Association, the Glen Burnie Volunteer Fire Company and the Glen Burnie High School marching band to light the tree.The tree lighting is one of several ways Glen Burnie celebrates the holidays, notes Barbara Moeller, the GBIA's unofficial holiday chairperson.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1996
Yes, Virginia, there are Santa form letters.With all the charm of a 1040 form, Santa form letters are hot in this year's X-mas files. By signing on the dotted line, said boy/girl agrees to "have snacks ready" for Santa and attests to having been nice to brother/sister.From another Baltimore child, another form letter:Please Print Your Name and Address:Pet's Name:Friends' Names:My Letter to Santa:(You May Use the Back.)"I've never gotten form letters before," Pat Mank says. "Unbelievable."Each year, we parachute into Pat Mank's office at the U.S. Postal Service in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1995
If nothing else, the Taneytown children writing letters to Santa Claus this holiday season have their priorities in order, according to a couple of elves with the Taneytown Recreation Council.While video games and Barbie dolls easily lead the children's wish lists, Dianne Tracey and Colleen Corum have learned that this generation of preschool and elementary school letter writers are also full of questions.Consider a sampling of nearly 100 "Dear Santa" letters that Mrs. Tracey and her neighbor, Mrs. Corum -- the latest in a long line of recreation council volunteers to answer letters to Santa -- have received so far:"How do you fit down the chimney?"
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1995
If nothing else, the Taneytown children writing letters to Santa Claus this holiday season have their priorities in order, according to a couple of elves with the Taneytown Recreation Council.While video games and Barbie dolls easily lead the children's wish lists, Dianne Tracey and Colleen Corum have learned that this generation of preschool and elementary school letter writers are also full of questions.Consider a sampling of nearly 100 "Dear Santa" letters that Mrs. Tracey and her neighbor, Mrs. Corum -- the latest in a long line of recreation council volunteers to answer letters to Santa -- have received so far:"How do you fit down the chimney?"
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | December 24, 1994
'Dear Santa Claus, How are you? This year I was, well, on a scale of one to ten I was probably an eight because I got on Mom's nervers a lot this year. (not intencholley)."Anyway, I would like a dog," writes Amanda of Ellicott City.At the main post office in downtown Baltimore, are hundreds of letters addressed to Santa Claus. Some added North Pole Toy Workshop, N.P., 11111, to ensure delivery. The post office will get more than 2,000 letters. It, of course, forwards them all to the North Pole and sends a greeting to children telling them their lists have been delivered.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1995
Young Charles of Baltimore mailed Santa something unusually festive this year. In his letter to Santa, the boy enclosed drawings of six, anatomically gifted females. Dear Santa, can you make these girls into dolls? Then give them to me. Tank you, Charles."It's a new world," says Pat Mank, shaking her head.Charles' letter went into the heap in Ms. Mank's office at the main post office in downtown Baltimore. Letters to Santa are piled here every year, on this very table, next to the "Women on Stamps" video cassettes and "Postal Guide to U.S. Stamps" books, which could make exciting stocking stuffers.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | December 24, 1994
'Dear Santa Claus, How are you? This year I was, well, on a scale of one to ten I was probably an eight because I got on Mom's nervers a lot this year. (not intencholley)."Anyway, I would like a dog," writes Amanda of Ellicott City.At the main post office in downtown Baltimore, are hundreds of letters addressed to Santa Claus. Some added North Pole Toy Workshop, N.P., 11111, to ensure delivery. The post office will get more than 2,000 letters. It, of course, forwards them all to the North Pole and sends a greeting to children telling them their lists have been delivered.
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