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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
Multiple students at Old Mill High School in Anne Arundel County were interviewed by administrators and school police Monday after an unsubstantiated rumor began spreading through the hallways that a shooting was planned there Friday. Those interviewing the students found "nothing credible" about the rumor, but Principal James Todd sent a letter home to parents - and sent out emails and a robocall message - alerting them to the troubling chatter. "We have interviewed every student whose name was brought to our attention and pursued every piece of information we have been given," Todd wrote in the letter.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
Multiple students at Old Mill High School in Anne Arundel County were interviewed by administrators and school police Monday after an unsubstantiated rumor began spreading through the hallways that a shooting was planned there Friday. Those interviewing the students found "nothing credible" about the rumor, but Principal James Todd sent a letter home to parents - and sent out emails and a robocall message - alerting them to the troubling chatter. "We have interviewed every student whose name was brought to our attention and pursued every piece of information we have been given," Todd wrote in the letter.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
At the height of the Civil War, a Union soldier climbed into the dome of the State House in Annapolis and described the scene around it, a sea of white tents spreading in every direction. The tents were home to thousands of soldiers captured by the Confederates and returned to the Union army. They would wait in Camp Parole until recalled to service or sent home. In a letter home, another infantryman described the dire conditions in the crowded camp and called the state capital "a low, dirty place.
EXPLORE
August 13, 2012
We frequently complain about big government but sometimes they can be very helpful. The following represents a case where the Maryland state government was very helpful to me. During the month of March 2012, I had a nationally known company perform repair work on my home. Unfortunately the work was performed in an unsatisfactory way and after months of dealing with the company we could not reach a resolution. I felt the company was not negotiating in good faith, so I contacted the Maryland Home Improvement Commission for assistance.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2012
The letters come, one after the other, from the Otero County Detention Center in New Mexico to a bungalow-style home in Dundalk that is encircled by a chain-link fence and festooned in a ribbon of Ravens purple. The letters are from Shelby Nichole Smith, who was an altar girl at Amazing Grace Lutheran Church and a top graduate of the old Southern High School before enlisting in the Army. Now she's known by her childhood nickname, BeBe, and authorities refer to her in official documents as "the gossip girl.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 11, 2004
As the all-news cable channels this week go into gung-ho overdrive with video-game-like images from the battle for Fallujah, along comes HBO this Veterans Day with a stark, poignant and almost unbearably moving reminder of the human cost of the war in Iraq. Last Letters Home: Voices of American Troops from the Battlefields of Iraq is the most eloquent and perfectly distilled hour of nonfiction TV that I have seen in this year of exceptional documentaries on television. Directed and produced by Academy Award winner Bill Couturie (Common Threads: Stories From the Quilt)
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac | February 24, 1991
In the end, it won't be the news correspondents or the politicians who are the truest chroniclers of the Persian Gulf war. It will be the soldiers.In dispatches to the home front, U.S. troops are writing to those closest to them of their fears, loneliness, hopes, anger. In their hands, the ordinary can become extraordinary.*Feb. 12Dear Mom, I've been gone almost two months now. Has it become any quieter or have you noticed? I'm real tired right now but I can't sleep. Whoever said it was hot in the desert lied.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1995
During his 13-month tour of duty in the Korean War, retired Sgt. Boris R. Spiroff endured the dangers of shrapnel, bullets and bone-chilling cold by exchanging letters with his wife back home in Baltimore."
EXPLORE
August 13, 2012
We frequently complain about big government but sometimes they can be very helpful. The following represents a case where the Maryland state government was very helpful to me. During the month of March 2012, I had a nationally known company perform repair work on my home. Unfortunately the work was performed in an unsatisfactory way and after months of dealing with the company we could not reach a resolution. I felt the company was not negotiating in good faith, so I contacted the Maryland Home Improvement Commission for assistance.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Ryan Davis and Laura Loh and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
Glen Burnie High School officials sent a letter home to parents yesterday telling them that a 16-year-old student had reported that she was raped on campus Monday - but less than an hour after school closed police announced that much of the girl's story was not true. The student, whom authorities did not identify, told police Monday afternoon that she had been assaulted at knifepoint in a bathroom that morning. She had not reported the incident to school officials, police said. "We take these kind of things very seriously," said police Lt. Joseph E. Jordan.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
At the height of the Civil War, a Union soldier climbed into the dome of the State House in Annapolis and described the scene around it, a sea of white tents spreading in every direction. The tents were home to thousands of soldiers captured by the Confederates and returned to the Union army. They would wait in Camp Parole until recalled to service or sent home. In a letter home, another infantryman described the dire conditions in the crowded camp and called the state capital "a low, dirty place.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2012
The letters come, one after the other, from the Otero County Detention Center in New Mexico to a bungalow-style home in Dundalk that is encircled by a chain-link fence and festooned in a ribbon of Ravens purple. The letters are from Shelby Nichole Smith, who was an altar girl at Amazing Grace Lutheran Church and a top graduate of the old Southern High School before enlisting in the Army. Now she's known by her childhood nickname, BeBe, and authorities refer to her in official documents as "the gossip girl.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON AND NICOLE FULLER and KELLY BREWINGTON AND NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTERS | February 21, 2006
One of George Washington's most famous speeches is coming back to the Colonial city where he delivered it just two days before Christmas in 1783 - Annapolis, then the nation's capital. Washington, commander in chief of the Continental Army, stood in the Old Senate Chamber of the Maryland State House and, hands shaking, told members of the Continental Congress that he would lead no more. "Having now finished the work assigned me, I retire from the great theatre of Action - and bidding an Affectionate farewell to this August body under whose orders I have so long acted, I here offer my Commission, and take my leave of all the employments of public life," the 51-year-old war hero wrote.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 11, 2004
As the all-news cable channels this week go into gung-ho overdrive with video-game-like images from the battle for Fallujah, along comes HBO this Veterans Day with a stark, poignant and almost unbearably moving reminder of the human cost of the war in Iraq. Last Letters Home: Voices of American Troops from the Battlefields of Iraq is the most eloquent and perfectly distilled hour of nonfiction TV that I have seen in this year of exceptional documentaries on television. Directed and produced by Academy Award winner Bill Couturie (Common Threads: Stories From the Quilt)
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Ryan Davis and Laura Loh and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
Glen Burnie High School officials sent a letter home to parents yesterday telling them that a 16-year-old student had reported that she was raped on campus Monday - but less than an hour after school closed police announced that much of the girl's story was not true. The student, whom authorities did not identify, told police Monday afternoon that she had been assaulted at knifepoint in a bathroom that morning. She had not reported the incident to school officials, police said. "We take these kind of things very seriously," said police Lt. Joseph E. Jordan.
TOPIC
By Dail Willis | February 27, 2000
SHE WAS ONLY 11 years old when he died -- and Brenda Liechty Leister's memories of her father had worn gossamer-thin with remembering and retelling. Until one of her sisters showed her a shoebox full of letters their father had written between May 1944 and June 1945. The letters, 41 in all, were written while Sherman Liechty trained at Fort McClellan and Fort Meade, traveled to England, France, Belgium and Germany -- where he lost a leg after being shot by a Nazi soldier -- and finally returned to America to recuperate in a Utah hospital.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1998
Parents of Brooklyn Park Elementary School students are pleading with their state representatives and school board members to save their principal, Michael Trippett, from being transferred to another school."
TOPIC
By Dail Willis | February 27, 2000
SHE WAS ONLY 11 years old when he died -- and Brenda Liechty Leister's memories of her father had worn gossamer-thin with remembering and retelling. Until one of her sisters showed her a shoebox full of letters their father had written between May 1944 and June 1945. The letters, 41 in all, were written while Sherman Liechty trained at Fort McClellan and Fort Meade, traveled to England, France, Belgium and Germany -- where he lost a leg after being shot by a Nazi soldier -- and finally returned to America to recuperate in a Utah hospital.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1998
Parents of Brooklyn Park Elementary School students are pleading with their state representatives and school board members to save their principal, Michael Trippett, from being transferred to another school."
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1995
During his 13-month tour of duty in the Korean War, retired Sgt. Boris R. Spiroff endured the dangers of shrapnel, bullets and bone-chilling cold by exchanging letters with his wife back home in Baltimore."
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