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Lethal Force

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By Faith Hayden and Faith Hayden,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2002
Kidnappings, shootouts, gun-brandishing women and a rogue hero all wrapped up in one convoluted plot: What more could an action-movie fan ask for? How about a dash of satire? Lethal Force, a 70-minute parody of B action movies, has all of this -- plus an onslaught of ketchup-like blood effects and a power drill scene that would make Tim "The Tool-Man" Allen cringe. "[Lethal Force] is about a guy whose son gets kidnapped, wife is murdered and is forced to betray his best friend," says Kristen Anchor, coordinator of Baltimore's Creative Alliance Movie Makers, which is presenting the film Friday at the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown.
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NEWS
February 26, 2013
In a truly moral and civilized society, people would interact exclusively through persuasion. Force would have no place as a means of social interaction. Yet the only thing that removes force from the menu is the personal firearm, paradoxical as that may sound. When I carry a gun, you cannot deal with me by force. You have to use reason and try to persuade me, because I have a way to negate your threat or use of force. The gun puts a 100-lb. woman on equal footing with a 220-lb.
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NEWS
By JOHN F. DOUGHERTY | August 24, 1997
I have spent 20 years in police work, and it has become readily apparent to me that police departments rely too heavily on the use of deadly force.This reliance begins at the police academy where recruits are taught to fire at faceless targets, which do not talk, sweat or bleed. Recruits are often rewarded for their marksmanship by being given a firearm, a plaque or a medal of commendation.Throughout their careers, officers receive more in-service training and qualification time with firearms than they do with communication skills and nonlethal use of weapons.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
Someone please tell Anthony Guglielmi, the Baltimore Police Department's chief spokesman, to use a bit of common sense when making pronouncements ("Council wants data on girl's killing, March 9). In addressing what seems like a city police officer's involvement in the aftermath of the shooting death of a 13-year-old girl, Mr. Guglielmi says "every organization - whether a police department, a doctor's office or an airline - has problem employees. " I don't believe the latter two places of employment are legally empowered to let their employees carry capital punishment on their hips, by that I mean a firearm.
NEWS
By R. W. Rogers and R. W. Rogers,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 23, 2001
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - The Army's new motto of "An Army of One" might aptly describe the coming generations of infantrymen, whose futuristic equipment is evolving under the Training and Doctrine Command based at Fort Monroe in Hampton, Va. Part Universal Soldier and part Power Ranger, the soldiers of the future will meld man and machine into a lethal force that the Army hopes will dominate the battlefield. The Army believes it can field its next generation of soldier, dubbed Land Warrior, within the next four years, and Future Warrior 2025 has gripped so many imaginations that the Army may push for its debut as early as 2012.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
In a truly moral and civilized society, people would interact exclusively through persuasion. Force would have no place as a means of social interaction. Yet the only thing that removes force from the menu is the personal firearm, paradoxical as that may sound. When I carry a gun, you cannot deal with me by force. You have to use reason and try to persuade me, because I have a way to negate your threat or use of force. The gun puts a 100-lb. woman on equal footing with a 220-lb.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
Someone please tell Anthony Guglielmi, the Baltimore Police Department's chief spokesman, to use a bit of common sense when making pronouncements ("Council wants data on girl's killing, March 9). In addressing what seems like a city police officer's involvement in the aftermath of the shooting death of a 13-year-old girl, Mr. Guglielmi says "every organization - whether a police department, a doctor's office or an airline - has problem employees. " I don't believe the latter two places of employment are legally empowered to let their employees carry capital punishment on their hips, by that I mean a firearm.
NEWS
January 7, 2004
WAS IT A good shoot? In other words, was the police officer legally justified in firing his gun? That's usually the overriding question police ask after one of their own shoots a citizen. The reviews that take place seek to answer that question, but do they ask if the shooting could have been avoided? The circumstances of the Dec. 8 shooting death of Cephus Smith appear justifiable, if you will. As police tell it, Mr. Smith, angry over a rent increase, shot and critically wounded the manager of his apartment complex (she died weeks later)
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2000
Sgt. Mark Gonder doesn't see the red dot of an Air Taser gun on his chest an instant before two metal probes send their jolt of 50,000 volts of electricity into him. Once hit, he crumples, helpless and harmless - enough time for another officer to handcuff him. Gonder, a Carroll County sheriff's deputy, agreed to play a suspect in a demonstration of one of an array of tools, known as "less lethal weapons," available to Maryland law enforcement officers....
NEWS
September 11, 1997
TCPlutonium space probe causes safety concernAs a protester against the launch of the Cassini space probe with 73 pounds of plutonium on board, I was greatly disturbed by the Sept. 2 article, ''NASA fears 'enemy within' for Oct. launch.''It is preposterous for the space administration to suggest possible ''sabotage'' and to go on military alert ''to counteract possible terrorism.'' Such behavior is calculated to smear those of us condemning the use of plutonium in space.Actually, the anti-Cassini movement is non-violent.
NEWS
November 30, 2007
It's time to curb police violence It is a shame that The Sun's first mention of the NAACP's declaration of a "state of emergency" concerning our criminal justice system's unequal and often lethal treatment of African-American youths came in Gregory Kane's column "NAACP alert reeks of hypocrisy" (Nov. 24). The latest victim of this epidemic was Khiel Coppin, who died in a hail of 20 bullets from five police officers in New York on Nov. 12. He was holding a hairbrush. At a recent protest in Washington, grieving parents told of their children dying from police overkill.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2006
On TV or in the movies, police trying to stop the bad guy routinely aim for the knees or shoulder and pull the trigger. Action heroes can even shoot a suspect's hand to make him drop his weapon. Reality is quite different. Police officers who make the split-second decision to fire their weapons are trained to direct their fire toward the largest part of the human body: the upper torso. After the fatal police shooting this month of a mentally ill, scissors-wielding teenager in Anne Arundel County, law enforcement officers are defending the necessity of that widely used policy.
NEWS
January 7, 2004
WAS IT A good shoot? In other words, was the police officer legally justified in firing his gun? That's usually the overriding question police ask after one of their own shoots a citizen. The reviews that take place seek to answer that question, but do they ask if the shooting could have been avoided? The circumstances of the Dec. 8 shooting death of Cephus Smith appear justifiable, if you will. As police tell it, Mr. Smith, angry over a rent increase, shot and critically wounded the manager of his apartment complex (she died weeks later)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2002
WASHINGTON - The F/A-22 jet fighter program appears likely to emerge relatively unscathed - at least in the short term - from a Pentagon review due this month. Defense Department planners probably won't reduce the current production plan through 2009 or make a decision on how many would be bought after that, according to Loren Thompson, an analyst at the Lexington Institute who has talked to numerous senior policy-makers involved in the process. "The Pentagon has decided to punt on the F/A-22 by sticking with the current program for the time being," Thompson said.
FEATURES
By Faith Hayden and Faith Hayden,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2002
Kidnappings, shootouts, gun-brandishing women and a rogue hero all wrapped up in one convoluted plot: What more could an action-movie fan ask for? How about a dash of satire? Lethal Force, a 70-minute parody of B action movies, has all of this -- plus an onslaught of ketchup-like blood effects and a power drill scene that would make Tim "The Tool-Man" Allen cringe. "[Lethal Force] is about a guy whose son gets kidnapped, wife is murdered and is forced to betray his best friend," says Kristen Anchor, coordinator of Baltimore's Creative Alliance Movie Makers, which is presenting the film Friday at the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown.
NEWS
By R. W. Rogers and R. W. Rogers,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 23, 2001
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - The Army's new motto of "An Army of One" might aptly describe the coming generations of infantrymen, whose futuristic equipment is evolving under the Training and Doctrine Command based at Fort Monroe in Hampton, Va. Part Universal Soldier and part Power Ranger, the soldiers of the future will meld man and machine into a lethal force that the Army hopes will dominate the battlefield. The Army believes it can field its next generation of soldier, dubbed Land Warrior, within the next four years, and Future Warrior 2025 has gripped so many imaginations that the Army may push for its debut as early as 2012.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2002
WASHINGTON - The F/A-22 jet fighter program appears likely to emerge relatively unscathed - at least in the short term - from a Pentagon review due this month. Defense Department planners probably won't reduce the current production plan through 2009 or make a decision on how many would be bought after that, according to Loren Thompson, an analyst at the Lexington Institute who has talked to numerous senior policy-makers involved in the process. "The Pentagon has decided to punt on the F/A-22 by sticking with the current program for the time being," Thompson said.
NEWS
November 30, 2007
It's time to curb police violence It is a shame that The Sun's first mention of the NAACP's declaration of a "state of emergency" concerning our criminal justice system's unequal and often lethal treatment of African-American youths came in Gregory Kane's column "NAACP alert reeks of hypocrisy" (Nov. 24). The latest victim of this epidemic was Khiel Coppin, who died in a hail of 20 bullets from five police officers in New York on Nov. 12. He was holding a hairbrush. At a recent protest in Washington, grieving parents told of their children dying from police overkill.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2000
Sgt. Mark Gonder doesn't see the red dot of an Air Taser gun on his chest an instant before two metal probes send their jolt of 50,000 volts of electricity into him. Once hit, he crumples, helpless and harmless - enough time for another officer to handcuff him. Gonder, a Carroll County sheriff's deputy, agreed to play a suspect in a demonstration of one of an array of tools, known as "less lethal weapons," available to Maryland law enforcement officers....
NEWS
By DeWayne Wickham | December 10, 1999
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Last month, shortly after a jury was seated in the wrongful-death lawsuit brought against the owner of a suburban shopping mall here, attorney Johnnie Cochran, who represented the family of the deceased, told me the case wouldn't go to the jury."
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