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By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2001
It may have looked like the Columbia Council was hopelessly divided and dug in last week, split 5-5 between two candidates for Columbia Association president. But behind the scenes, support was growing for one of the candidates -- Michael D. Letcher -- who probably would have gotten the job if he hadn't dropped out, council sources said. "We had it, and he just quit right in the middle of it," one source said. "The votes were there," said another. In a nearly five-hour, closed-door meeting Jan. 8, the council deadlocked over who should head the homeowners association, which provides recreational and other services to the town's 87,000 residents.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
An Arnold man is accused of assaulting a woman in a domestic dispute in Pasadena early Wednesday. Anne Arundel County police officers arrived at the home in the unit block of Nicholson Drive at about 12:45 a.m. to find a man in the driveway with a stab wound in the hip and a woman inside the home with a laceration to the hand, Lt. T.J. Smith said. Jon Robert Letcher Jr., 29, of the unit block of East Joyce Lane in Arnold, was charged with first- and second-degree assault, reckless endangerment and deadly weapon with intent to injure.
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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2001
In another surprise twist to the search for a Columbia Association president, the Columbia Council raised the possibility last night of hiring a candidate who withdrew last month after complaining about alleged racism and threatening to sue. The council voted to meet in executive session to discuss offering the job to Michael D. Letcher, city manager of Sedona, Ariz., or to interim president Maggie J. Brown. Also on the table was a proposal to continue a national search for a president or postpone it until after April council elections.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | June 27, 2004
Anyone for waterfalls? During a summer Sunday's family drive, the stream that goes over a cliff -- cool, sparkling, photogenic -- is more than worth a stop-off. And if Pennsylvania has 184 spread-out falls, and New Jersey 30-plus, Maryland's seven are nonetheless among the best. This on the authority of Gary Letcher of Ashton, in his book Waterfalls of the Mid-Atlantic States (Countryman, 245 pages, $17.95). An outdoorsman and an environmentalist, Letcher writes for beginners and experts alike.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2001
The two men competing for the Columbia Association presidency made their pitches directly to the public yesterday, one day before what appears to be a closely divided Columbia Council might try to choose between them. Appearing at a public forum that attracted about 80 residents were Gregory C. Fehrenbach, 53, administrator for the township of Piscataway, N.J.; and Michael D. Letcher, 47, city manager of Sedona, Ariz. A third finalist, Theodore J. Staton, 45, city manager of East Lansing, Mich.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2000
The city manager of an Arizona resort town, who was a finalist the last time the Columbia Association was looking for a president, is in the running for the job again, sources said yesterday. Michael Letcher, city manager of Sedona, Ariz., is one of three finalists to head the Columbia homeowners association for the community of 87,000. Letcher sought the job two years ago but lost out to Deborah O. McCarty, who resigned under pressure in May after 20 months. Names of the two other finalists have not been made public.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2001
In a town where planning is everything, where neighbors run into each other not by chance but by design, the search for someone to run Columbia wasn't handled willy-nilly. For months, Columbia Council members haggled over the smallest details of hiring a Columbia Association president. But instead of proceeding according to the script, the search played out more like reality TV, with two of the three finalists voting themselves off the island. Only in this drama, the survivor didn't win, either.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2001
In a town where planning is everything, where neighbors run into each other not by chance but by design, the search for someone to run Columbia wasn't handled willy-nilly. For months, Columbia Council members haggled over the smallest details of hiring a Columbia Association president. But instead of proceeding according to the script, the search played out more like reality TV, with two of the three finalists voting themselves off the island. Only in this drama, the survivor didn't win, either.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2001
The search for a new Columbia Association president collapsed yesterday as the second of three finalists bowed out, complaining about the community's racial climate and threatening to sue over an alleged attack on his integrity. The surprise withdrawal of Michael D. Letcher came less than a week after another candidate, Theodore J. Staton, dropped out, also citing racial politics as a factor. That leaves one finalist in the running to oversee one of the nation's largest homeowners associations.
NEWS
January 13, 2001
LIMPING back to square one. After months of laborious and expensive screening, the search for a new Columbia Association president has foundered on the shoals of a flawed council structure, allegations of racial politics and differing management styles. The Columbia Council deadlocked in a 5-5 vote over two candidates: Michael D. Letcher, the city manager of Sedona, Ariz., and Gregory C. Fehrenbach, administrator for the town of Piscataway, N.J. Differences of opinion about Columbia's needs were to be expected, even healthy.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2001
In a town where planning is everything, where neighbors run into each other not by chance but by design, the search for someone to run Columbia wasn't handled willy-nilly. For months, Columbia Council members haggled over the smallest details of hiring a Columbia Association president. But instead of proceeding according to the script, the search played out more like reality TV, with two of the three finalists voting themselves off the island. Only in this drama, the survivor didn't win, either.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2001
In a town where planning is everything, where neighbors run into each other not by chance but by design, the search for someone to run Columbia wasn't handled willy-nilly. For months, Columbia Council members haggled over the smallest details of hiring a Columbia Association president. But instead of proceeding according to the script, the search played out more like reality TV, with two of the three finalists voting themselves off the island. Only in this drama, the survivor didn't win, either.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2001
In another surprise twist to the search for a Columbia Association president, the Columbia Council raised the possibility last night of hiring a candidate who withdrew last month after complaining about alleged racism and threatening to sue. The council voted to meet in executive session to discuss offering the job to Michael D. Letcher, city manager of Sedona, Ariz., or to interim president Maggie J. Brown. Also on the table was a proposal to continue a national search for a president or postpone it until after April council elections.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
At a public forum marked by angry exchanges, one Columbia Council member called last night for postponing the search for a new Columbia Association president, and another said it should be called off altogether. Black clergy and community leaders invited the council and the public to St. John Baptist Church to talk about alleged racism in the search for a new Columbia Association president. About 55 residents and seven of the council's 10 members attended. The Rev. Robert A.F. Turner, pastor of the church and president of the African American Coalition of Howard County, called the meeting after the council's attempt to hire a president collapsed this month amid charges of racism.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2001
It may have looked like the Columbia Council was hopelessly divided and dug in last week, split 5-5 between two candidates for Columbia Association president. But behind the scenes, support was growing for one of the candidates -- Michael D. Letcher -- who probably would have gotten the job if he hadn't dropped out, council sources said. "We had it, and he just quit right in the middle of it," one source said. "The votes were there," said another. In a nearly five-hour, closed-door meeting Jan. 8, the council deadlocked over who should head the homeowners association, which provides recreational and other services to the town's 87,000 residents.
NEWS
January 13, 2001
LIMPING back to square one. After months of laborious and expensive screening, the search for a new Columbia Association president has foundered on the shoals of a flawed council structure, allegations of racial politics and differing management styles. The Columbia Council deadlocked in a 5-5 vote over two candidates: Michael D. Letcher, the city manager of Sedona, Ariz., and Gregory C. Fehrenbach, administrator for the town of Piscataway, N.J. Differences of opinion about Columbia's needs were to be expected, even healthy.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2001
Dozens of angry residents confronted the Columbia Council last night over its derailed attempt to hire a new Columbia Association president, saying they were embarrassed and outraged by a process that unraveled with the withdrawal of two finalists. The panel later met behind closed doors to try to determine whether to hire the one candidate left or start over. The council was still in session early this morning. About 70 people crammed into the council room to blast the council for how it handled the hiring process, which fell apart this week amid claims that some council members did not back finalist Michael D. Letcher because he is black.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2001
Racial politics, internal disputes and honest philosophical differences have left the Columbia Council deadlocked 5-5 as it tries to choose a new president for one of the nation's largest homeowners associations. In a five-hour, closed-door meeting Monday night, the council was evenly split between finalists Gregory C. Fehrenbach, 53, administrator for the township of Piscataway, N.J., and Michael D. Letcher, 47, city manager of Sedona, Ariz. The council is scheduled to try again tomorrow night.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2001
Dozens of angry residents confronted the Columbia Council last night over its derailed attempt to hire a new Columbia Association president, saying they were embarrassed and outraged by a process that unraveled with the withdrawal of two finalists. The panel later met behind closed doors to try to determine whether to hire the one candidate left or start over. The council was still in session early this morning. About 70 people crammed into the council room to blast the council for how it handled the hiring process, which fell apart this week amid claims that some council members did not back finalist Michael D. Letcher because he is black.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2001
The search for a new Columbia Association president collapsed yesterday as the second of three finalists bowed out, complaining about the community's racial climate and threatening to sue over an alleged attack on his integrity. The surprise withdrawal of Michael D. Letcher came less than a week after another candidate, Theodore J. Staton, dropped out, also citing racial politics as a factor. That leaves one finalist in the running to oversee one of the nation's largest homeowners associations.
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