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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 22, 2002
Can garlic and crosses protect us from awful, pretentious vampire movies like Queen of the Damned? This kind of fiasco turns movie critics into so many Night Stalkers. You want to tell the public to beware of movies that begin with classy shots of ancient statuary and a voice moaning on and on about the intolerability of eternity. The notion behind the movie is that a rock 'n' roll culture filled with tattoos, body piercing, androgynous promiscuity and doomy proclamations would re-energize an 18th-century super-vampire like Lestat (Stuart Townsend)
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By ROBERT KAHN and ROBERT KAHN,NEWSDAY | April 20, 2006
Bernie Taupin's defense of Lestat is interrupted by a piercing "Aaaiyyeeee!" as a suicidal vampire plunges into a wall of fire and disappears through a trap door. Taupin leans forward from his seat in New York's Palace Theatre to observe the rehearsal more closely. It is ensuing under the supervision of the fire department, on hand to ensure that actor Joseph Dellger is far enough behind the flames to avoid injury if an unexpected breeze should cross the set. The winds have not blown in favor of the $12 million musical thus far. The Gothic opus inspired by Anne Rice's tormented bloodsuckers was left for dead after a San Francisco tryout that prompted a review headlined "Fetch the garlic!"
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NEWS
May 21, 1995
"Anne is underground writing on her latest novel,'The Servant of the Bones.' She will not be taking calls at this time. If you'd like to get on the mailing list for her newsletter, send a postcard. Newsletters are sporadically written when Anne can find the time. If you'd like information on the Vampire Lestat Fan Club, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Yearly dues are $13, outside of the U.S., dues are $18. The Memnoch Ball will be given Saturday Oct. 28, further details will be given in the newsletter.
NEWS
By VICTORIA BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 2005
Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt Anne Rice Alfred A. Knopf / 366 pages Three decades ago, Anne Rice published her classic debut novel, Interview with a Vampire, and with that a character nearly as iconic as Dracula was born. Rice's vampire, Lestat, was an angst-ridden, existentialist hero-villain, a vampire far more evolved than the average Hammer Film bloodsucker. Lestat had the suavity of many a vampire, but he also possessed soul and, to a degree, conscience; with Lestat, Rice had created a vampire for our time.
NEWS
By John Goecke | July 23, 1995
"Memnoch the Devil: The Vampire Chronicles," by Anne Rice. 354 pages. New York: Knopf. $25Anne Rice has rewritten the Bible. She's not the first or the last to do that. But until this book, she has always argued that no higher being exists. Now she introduces her readers to the Devil and God.Ms. Rice has become the mistress of macabre by producing a best-selling novel about once a year for either her Vampire Chronicles or Mayfair Witches series. She has always had a talent for placing the monsters of age-old legends into the modern world and making them seem really quite human, with emotions and sexual desires.
NEWS
By VICTORIA BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 2005
Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt Anne Rice Alfred A. Knopf / 366 pages Three decades ago, Anne Rice published her classic debut novel, Interview with a Vampire, and with that a character nearly as iconic as Dracula was born. Rice's vampire, Lestat, was an angst-ridden, existentialist hero-villain, a vampire far more evolved than the average Hammer Film bloodsucker. Lestat had the suavity of many a vampire, but he also possessed soul and, to a degree, conscience; with Lestat, Rice had created a vampire for our time.
FEATURES
By Allen Barra and Allen Barra,Special to The Sun | November 13, 1994
Neil Jordan won a Best Screenplay Oscar two years ago for "The Crying Game." He will not win his second for "Interview With the Vampire." Best Director, perhaps. But Jordan's name, which along with Anne Rice's was on an early print of the film under "screenplay by," is not on the print at theaters all over the world. "It's a thing with the Writers Guild," is all Jordan will say.However, Neil Jordan's signature is on every frame of "Interview With the Vampire." He underlines it in a scene where a journalist (Christian Slater)
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 18, 1990
She enters the hotel lobby trailing darkness; a small figure draped in flowing black, her long, dark hair falling like a curtain across her forehead and cheeks, her tiny feet encased in strange-looking black leather shoes. At first glance, Anne Rice, the novelist who has gained a cult following by inventing believable vampire minds and creating erotic, secret worlds inhabited by the living as well as the undead, looks every inch the Daughter of Darkness.Then she smiles and says hello. And like a crucifix held up before a vampire, her warm smile and friendly demeanor chase off any lingering images of unearthly forces and mystical powers gathered into the earthly body standing before you.In fact, an interview with the 49-year-old writer who has been chilling and thrilling readers since the appearance in 1976 of her best-selling "Interview With the Vampire" suggests that Anne Rice would make an excellent librarian: She's knowledgeable, helpful, direct and very, very smart.
FEATURES
By ROBERT KAHN and ROBERT KAHN,NEWSDAY | April 20, 2006
Bernie Taupin's defense of Lestat is interrupted by a piercing "Aaaiyyeeee!" as a suicidal vampire plunges into a wall of fire and disappears through a trap door. Taupin leans forward from his seat in New York's Palace Theatre to observe the rehearsal more closely. It is ensuing under the supervision of the fire department, on hand to ensure that actor Joseph Dellger is far enough behind the flames to avoid injury if an unexpected breeze should cross the set. The winds have not blown in favor of the $12 million musical thus far. The Gothic opus inspired by Anne Rice's tormented bloodsuckers was left for dead after a San Francisco tryout that prompted a review headlined "Fetch the garlic!"
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | November 5, 1992
Lestat is back -- big time -- in "The Tale of the Body Thief." And it's a return that will keep readers turning pages from start to finish. Be prepared for sleepless nights and long lunch hours as Anne Rice takes us on another uncharted tour of vampire land.This is the fourth in what has been termed the Vampire Chronicles, the first of which was "Interview With the Vampire" (1976), when readers were introduced to the vampire Lestat and his blood-imbibing cohorts. Reviews were glowing and set the stage for the next two installments, "The Vampire Lestat" and "The Queen of the Damned."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 22, 2002
Can garlic and crosses protect us from awful, pretentious vampire movies like Queen of the Damned? This kind of fiasco turns movie critics into so many Night Stalkers. You want to tell the public to beware of movies that begin with classy shots of ancient statuary and a voice moaning on and on about the intolerability of eternity. The notion behind the movie is that a rock 'n' roll culture filled with tattoos, body piercing, androgynous promiscuity and doomy proclamations would re-energize an 18th-century super-vampire like Lestat (Stuart Townsend)
NEWS
By John Goecke | July 23, 1995
"Memnoch the Devil: The Vampire Chronicles," by Anne Rice. 354 pages. New York: Knopf. $25Anne Rice has rewritten the Bible. She's not the first or the last to do that. But until this book, she has always argued that no higher being exists. Now she introduces her readers to the Devil and God.Ms. Rice has become the mistress of macabre by producing a best-selling novel about once a year for either her Vampire Chronicles or Mayfair Witches series. She has always had a talent for placing the monsters of age-old legends into the modern world and making them seem really quite human, with emotions and sexual desires.
NEWS
May 21, 1995
"Anne is underground writing on her latest novel,'The Servant of the Bones.' She will not be taking calls at this time. If you'd like to get on the mailing list for her newsletter, send a postcard. Newsletters are sporadically written when Anne can find the time. If you'd like information on the Vampire Lestat Fan Club, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Yearly dues are $13, outside of the U.S., dues are $18. The Memnoch Ball will be given Saturday Oct. 28, further details will be given in the newsletter.
FEATURES
By Allen Barra and Allen Barra,Special to The Sun | November 13, 1994
Neil Jordan won a Best Screenplay Oscar two years ago for "The Crying Game." He will not win his second for "Interview With the Vampire." Best Director, perhaps. But Jordan's name, which along with Anne Rice's was on an early print of the film under "screenplay by," is not on the print at theaters all over the world. "It's a thing with the Writers Guild," is all Jordan will say.However, Neil Jordan's signature is on every frame of "Interview With the Vampire." He underlines it in a scene where a journalist (Christian Slater)
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 18, 1990
She enters the hotel lobby trailing darkness; a small figure draped in flowing black, her long, dark hair falling like a curtain across her forehead and cheeks, her tiny feet encased in strange-looking black leather shoes. At first glance, Anne Rice, the novelist who has gained a cult following by inventing believable vampire minds and creating erotic, secret worlds inhabited by the living as well as the undead, looks every inch the Daughter of Darkness.Then she smiles and says hello. And like a crucifix held up before a vampire, her warm smile and friendly demeanor chase off any lingering images of unearthly forces and mystical powers gathered into the earthly body standing before you.In fact, an interview with the 49-year-old writer who has been chilling and thrilling readers since the appearance in 1976 of her best-selling "Interview With the Vampire" suggests that Anne Rice would make an excellent librarian: She's knowledgeable, helpful, direct and very, very smart.
FEATURES
By Anita M. Busch and Anita M. Busch,The Hollywood Reporter | May 6, 1994
"Interview With the Vampire" author Anne Rice shot a letter off to People Weekly on Tuesday taking issue with a short magazine article on Tom Cruise and advising the magazine not to be "so eager to whore for [Pat] Kingsley or Cruise" by writing "idiotic trash" from the publicity machine run by Pat Kingsley.The May 9 People article says Ms. Rice didn't want Tom Cruise to play the Vampire Lestat because she wanted "a less clean-cut lead."Ms. Rice wrote, "Did Pat Kingsley dictate it to you, or are you really that stupid?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 11, 1994
"Interview with the Vampire" does seem to have discovered something like the secret of eternal life. At least when you leave the theater, you feel as if you've been in it for a thousand years.Derived from the beloved first novel by mistress of the dark Anne Rice, it unfortunately seems a work primarily intended for Rice Krispies -- that is, people who've already had their brains toasted by reading too much Anne Rice.They'll at least get it. The movie's fundamental flaw, from an outsider's point of view, possibly stems from the fact that Rice wrote the screen adaption, under the assumption that her viewers would be familiar with the original text and that her main thrust should be to get as much of the book into the film as possible.
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