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Marta H. Mossburg | August 2, 2011
Visitors to Baltimore not shepherded through on official tours or staying in the Inner Harbor see what members of the Society for International Development would describe as the Third World. The organization, whose members are luminaries of foreign aid, held its triennial meeting at the posh Omni Shoreham Hotel inWashington last weekend as debt ceiling battles were raging a couple miles away in the Capitol. It would have been better for the group to hold its meeting in Baltimore, as some of the suggestions aimed at bettering far-away places in Africa and Asia could have been picked up immediately here.
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NEWS
February 26, 2014
As a 30-year retired wrestling coach still active on state committees, I was saddened to hear of the passing of Gregory Kane ( "Gregory Kane, former Sun columnist, dies at 62," Feb. 20). Mr. Kane often wrote about wrestling in relation to his own high school experiences and to the values taught by the nature of the sport. The extraordinary mental and physical requirements led to the development of discipline and a work ethic that many wrestlers display throughout their lives.
NEWS
June 15, 2014
No one should be surprised at what's happening in Iraq ("Obama weighing action in Iraq: Militants' sweep toward Baghdad threatens to embroil region," June 13). Saddam Hussein was a Sunni Muslim, the minority sect in Iraq. He was cruel to the majority Shiites and kept a handle on them. When we killed him, it destroyed the balance of power. If former President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney were smart, they would have realized this. Now we are suffering the consequences.
NEWS
By Cokie & Steven V. Roberts | August 11, 1995
THE JUXTAPOSITION could not have been more striking: Hiroshima and Hanoi -- two wars with two very different endings, and two very different lessons.The bang that concluded World War II, in addition to ushering in the atomic age and all that implies, taught us anew that victory requires might. In the half-century that's followed we've spent much of our treasure making sure no one is mightier. Candidates soft on defense" have seen their political lives comes to untimely ends. And now in Congress, Republican senators, convinced they can't trust the Defense Department of a Democratic administration, are busy adding more money to the Pentagon budget than the generals have asked for, including funding for Ronald Reagan's missile defense system, Star Wars.
NEWS
By Garland L. Thompson | September 13, 1990
A POLITICAL SEASON is supposed to present dramatic lessons that everyone is tuned in to hear. But Tuesday's primary, under-attended and under-supported, generated little drama in Baltimore's black precincts.That is not to say lessons were not there to be learned. Michael Dobson, a bright, likable fellow with engaging ideas but little political experience, probably learned some good ones in the Seventh District congressional primary. Rep. Kweisi Mfume, a two-term city councilman who swept all comers in a multi-sided race to succeed Parren Mitchell, walked away with all the votes to win renomination.
NEWS
May 28, 1992
Of all the lessons Hollie Rice will learn while studying at Towson State University, probably none will prove more memorable or valuable to her than the lesson of the past several weeks.Last month in the University Union, the 18-year-old sophomore was chatting with a friend about a course taught by David Bergman, a highly regarded TSU literature professor who happens to be gay. A young man -- a stranger to both Ms. Rice and her friend -- butted into the conversation to make anti-gay and anti-Semitic remarks about the professor.
NEWS
February 3, 1994
There are some useful lessons in the announcement this week that drug usage has taken an alarming upturn among young people during the past year, as measured by a respected, long-term study conducted by the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research.The upward direction in drug use during the past two years indicates a reversal of an encouraging downward trend that began more than a decade ago. In 1979, for instance, 54 percent of 12th graders told the researchers they had used an illicit drug in the previous year.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2005
Christine Flanagan was considering giving up teaching fire prevention when a house fire changed her mind. "I wasn't sure the kids were getting anything out of it," she said recently. "Then one day after a house fire, the crew came back and said, `Chris, a little girl you taught saved her family's life.'" The child told the firefighters how Flanagan had taught her what to do in the event of a fire - get everybody out of the house and call 911. The fire could have been deadly if the child hadn't remembered Flanagan's lessons.
NEWS
By HAROLD JACKSON | May 24, 1998
DEAR daughter,It's hard to believe that in only a few days you will be among the hundreds of young men and women in Howard County who will receive their diplomas as high school graduates.As you walk across the stage at Merriweather Post Pavilion, I know my thoughts will travel back to that first walk you made, across the living room floor to your pop. At 9 months old, your gait was steady. You exhibited the confidence that I have now come to expect from you.Pulled up stakesI know that hasn't always been easy.
NEWS
By Seamus Martin and Seamus Martin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2003
Seamus Martin, former Moscow correspondent and international editor of The Irish Times, has reported on conflicts throughout the world, including those in Chechnya and Northern Ireland. He considers what lessons they offer for the war in Iraq, where by yesterday uniformed forces of the regime had disappeared and U.S.-led forces were entering an unpredictable civilian environment. There is no harm in euphoria provided it does not last too long. The victory should be celebrated but this should be done with an eye to the future.
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