Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLesser Antilles
IN THE NEWS

Lesser Antilles

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
A system of rain and thunderstorms about 350 miles east of the Lesser Antilles islands could become the third named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season within the next several days, according to the National Hurricane Center. Forecasters give it a 70 percent chance of forming into a tropical cyclone, which would be named Tropical Storm Cristobal, within five days. While it's still too early to forecast any track or intensity with any certainty, models suggest it could track across Puerto Rico, Hispaniola and Cuba, then the Bahamas and Florida.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
As a tropical cyclone churned the Atlantic Ocean this month, a drone watched from above, dropping a paper-towel-roll-sized set of sensors attached to a parachute through the clouds on a 20-minute, 10-mile journey. The instruments revealed dry air low in the storm's center - something scientists from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center suspect was the nascent eye of Hurricane Edouard. The storm went on to become the Atlantic's first to reach winds of more than 110 mph since Sandy in 2012, though it never threatened the United States.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,The Evening Sun Pier 500, Harborview Marina, 500 Harborview Dr., 625-0500. The Sun Bolongo Bay, 760 Ritchie Highway, Severna Park, 544-2011. The Sunday Sun | December 15, 1990
Karson's, 5100 Holabird Ave., 631-5400.Karson's Inn calls itself "A Baltimore Landmark" and, indeed, it BTC has been part of the city's dining repertoire since 1924. The atmosphere is slightly nautical and the food traditional Baltimore, with a little bit of many things on its large menu; meal-sized salads, omelets, steaks, lasagna and a great selection of seafood. The Flounder A'La Francaise ($13.75) was extremely tender and delicious. $$moderate. (Last visited 7/90.)An imaginative New American menu at premium prices?
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Tropical Storm Cristobal is following much the same path as Hurricane Bertha took, expected to stay well off the Atlantic coast as it heads north, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm was about 115 miles east-northeast of San Salvador island in the Bahamas and had maximum sustained winds of 60 mph as of 8 a.m. Monday. Cristobal is expected to slowly strengthen over the next couple of days, possibly reaching hurricane status, according to the hurricane center. So far, the cyclone has taken a similar course as Bertha did at the beginning of the month, tracking through the Lesser Antilles, Hispaniola and the Bahamas before heading up north-northeastward well off the East Coast.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 2, 2012
The Atlantic hurricane season could be in for a jolt in the next few weeks, at least according to AccuWeather. It has been more than a month since Tropical Storm Debby dissipated after drenching Florida and moving out to sea. The lull could soon end -- what is being called Tropical Depression Five is expected to become Tropical Storm Ernesto some time on Friday, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm is anticipated to impact the Lesser Antilles in the southern Caribbean on Friday and potentially Jamaica by Monday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 20, 2012
There is an 80 percent chance Tropical Storm Isaac will have formed near the Lesser Antilles in the eastern Caribbean Sea by Wednesday morning, according to the National Hurricane Center. It's still too early to predict the storm's track, but weather-watching enthusiasts are discussing the possibility that it could make a turn toward the north and impact the East Coast. It's also possible it could move toward the Gulf of Mexico states or the Yucatan Peninsula, or that it could disintegrate thanks to dry air and high wind shear, of course.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Tropical Storm Gabrielle formed late Wednesday and quickly weakened to a tropical depression Thursday, and meteorologists are meanwhile watching several other systems that could eventually become tropical cyclones. The storm brushed past Puerto Rico and dumped heavy rains there earlier Thursday, but the National Hurricane Center's forecasts say it is not expected to restrengthen. That means the unusual streak without a hurricane this season will continue at least a few more days.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Tropical Storm Bertha formed late Thursday night, forecast to be headed toward the Lesser Antilles, Puerto Rico and the Bahamas, but not U.S. shores. The storm was about 110 miles east-northeast of Barbados as of 8 a.m., with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center. Tropical storm warnings were in effect from Barbados to the British and U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. The center forecasts the storm will continue to move northwest until it reaches the Bahamas some time early Monday, before turning back toward the northeast, away from the U.S. Atlantic coast.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Tropical Storm Cristobal is following much the same path as Hurricane Bertha took, expected to stay well off the Atlantic coast as it heads north, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm was about 115 miles east-northeast of San Salvador island in the Bahamas and had maximum sustained winds of 60 mph as of 8 a.m. Monday. Cristobal is expected to slowly strengthen over the next couple of days, possibly reaching hurricane status, according to the hurricane center. So far, the cyclone has taken a similar course as Bertha did at the beginning of the month, tracking through the Lesser Antilles, Hispaniola and the Bahamas before heading up north-northeastward well off the East Coast.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
As a tropical cyclone churned the Atlantic Ocean this month, a drone watched from above, dropping a paper-towel-roll-sized set of sensors attached to a parachute through the clouds on a 20-minute, 10-mile journey. The instruments revealed dry air low in the storm's center - something scientists from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center suspect was the nascent eye of Hurricane Edouard. The storm went on to become the Atlantic's first to reach winds of more than 110 mph since Sandy in 2012, though it never threatened the United States.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
A system of rain and thunderstorms about 350 miles east of the Lesser Antilles islands could become the third named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season within the next several days, according to the National Hurricane Center. Forecasters give it a 70 percent chance of forming into a tropical cyclone, which would be named Tropical Storm Cristobal, within five days. While it's still too early to forecast any track or intensity with any certainty, models suggest it could track across Puerto Rico, Hispaniola and Cuba, then the Bahamas and Florida.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Tropical Storm Bertha formed late Thursday night, forecast to be headed toward the Lesser Antilles, Puerto Rico and the Bahamas, but not U.S. shores. The storm was about 110 miles east-northeast of Barbados as of 8 a.m., with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center. Tropical storm warnings were in effect from Barbados to the British and U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. The center forecasts the storm will continue to move northwest until it reaches the Bahamas some time early Monday, before turning back toward the northeast, away from the U.S. Atlantic coast.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Tropical Storm Gabrielle formed late Wednesday and quickly weakened to a tropical depression Thursday, and meteorologists are meanwhile watching several other systems that could eventually become tropical cyclones. The storm brushed past Puerto Rico and dumped heavy rains there earlier Thursday, but the National Hurricane Center's forecasts say it is not expected to restrengthen. That means the unusual streak without a hurricane this season will continue at least a few more days.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 20, 2012
There is an 80 percent chance Tropical Storm Isaac will have formed near the Lesser Antilles in the eastern Caribbean Sea by Wednesday morning, according to the National Hurricane Center. It's still too early to predict the storm's track, but weather-watching enthusiasts are discussing the possibility that it could make a turn toward the north and impact the East Coast. It's also possible it could move toward the Gulf of Mexico states or the Yucatan Peninsula, or that it could disintegrate thanks to dry air and high wind shear, of course.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 2, 2012
The Atlantic hurricane season could be in for a jolt in the next few weeks, at least according to AccuWeather. It has been more than a month since Tropical Storm Debby dissipated after drenching Florida and moving out to sea. The lull could soon end -- what is being called Tropical Depression Five is expected to become Tropical Storm Ernesto some time on Friday, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm is anticipated to impact the Lesser Antilles in the southern Caribbean on Friday and potentially Jamaica by Monday.
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 2007
FORT-DE-FRANCE, MARTINIQUE // Strolling down the narrow, cobblestone streets of Fort-de-France, the nearly 400-year-old capital of the Caribbean island of Martinique, I wipe my brow in the midday heat and wonder whether I should interrupt my sightseeing for a cold, creamy glace -- French ice cream. As I make my way down rue Victor-Hugo, passing boutiques, cafes and shops in the lively shopping district, I spot two Martinican women in business suits, holding colorful parasols to shield the beaming sun. The ladies look cool, composed and tres chic, despite the soaring temperatures.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to The Sun | May 28, 1995
Josephine Jacobsen seems to go through life on the lookout, somewhat like a bird-watcher. From first light onward, never knowing when poetry material will go whizzing by - or just be sitting there - and daring her to try putting it into words. She's at the beach; she's in church or at the circus; now she's watching two little girls on a trampoline. Or, "The exterminator has arrived. . . ."Every literate, long-term Marylander is aware of Josephine Jacobsen; after her 1971-73 term as what is now called the U.S. poet laureate, so is the poetry-reading world beyond.
TRAVEL
By Bob Downing and Bob Downing,McClatchy-Tribune | March 25, 2007
ORIENT BEACH, St. Martin // There are beaches. And then there are beaches. Welcome to Orient Beach, a two-mile strip of soft white coral sand and perfect blue water that seems to be in a league of its own in the Caribbean. The celebrated beach on the French half of the two-country island gets a lot of attention and a lot of hype. It proudly calls itself "the Riviera of the Caribbean" and "the certified best beach in the Caribbean." It's not St-Tropez, but it is a beach with a buzz. Orient Beach is popular and may be crowded, but it is a world-famous beach destination.
TRAVEL
By Bob Downing and Bob Downing,McClatchy-Tribune | March 25, 2007
ORIENT BEACH, St. Martin // There are beaches. And then there are beaches. Welcome to Orient Beach, a two-mile strip of soft white coral sand and perfect blue water that seems to be in a league of its own in the Caribbean. The celebrated beach on the French half of the two-country island gets a lot of attention and a lot of hype. It proudly calls itself "the Riviera of the Caribbean" and "the certified best beach in the Caribbean." It's not St-Tropez, but it is a beach with a buzz. Orient Beach is popular and may be crowded, but it is a world-famous beach destination.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to The Sun | May 28, 1995
Josephine Jacobsen seems to go through life on the lookout, somewhat like a bird-watcher. From first light onward, never knowing when poetry material will go whizzing by - or just be sitting there - and daring her to try putting it into words. She's at the beach; she's in church or at the circus; now she's watching two little girls on a trampoline. Or, "The exterminator has arrived. . . ."Every literate, long-term Marylander is aware of Josephine Jacobsen; after her 1971-73 term as what is now called the U.S. poet laureate, so is the poetry-reading world beyond.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.