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By NEWSDAY | May 13, 2005
The ancient scourge known as leprosy likely originated in either East Africa or Central Asia and extended its reach in a pattern mirroring human migration, according to a new analysis of its bacterial agent's unusual genetic fingerprint. The study, by researchers at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, suggests the disease reached West Africa and North America through infected explorers, traders or colonists within the past 500 years and infiltrated the Caribbean and South America via slave trade in the 18th century.
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NEWS
March 11, 2007
The Colony By John Tayman From 1866 through 1969, the Hawaiian and American governments banished nearly 9,000 leprosy sufferers into exile on a peninsula on the Hawaiian island of Molokai. Former Outside editor Tayman crafts a tale of fear, endurance and hope in telling the story of these unfortunate victims of ignorance (leprosy is caused by a simple bacterium and isn't nearly as contagious as was long believed). After a smallpox epidemic wiped out a fifth of the Hawaiian population in the 1850s, leprosy was seen as the next cataclysmic threat, and drastic measures were taken.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | November 18, 2001
Q. Is it true that thalidomide is effective against cancer? How does it work, and how safe is it? Doesn't thalidomide cause birth defects? A. Thalidomide was responsible for one of the most terrible drug disasters of the 20th century. When pregnant women took this medication as a sleeping pill, their babies were born with deformed limbs. Although it was banned for decades, thalidomide has been resurrected as a new treatment for cancer and leprosy. It is especially effective against a blood cancer called multiple myeloma.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLLOVE and MICHAEL OLLOVE,SUN BOOK EDITOR | January 29, 2006
The Colony: The Harrowing True Story of the Exiles of Molokai John Tayman Scribner / 421 pages / $27.50 In 1884, the Hawaiian Supreme Court declared that contracting leprosy was not a crime. It only had to be treated as one. The ruling left everything as it had been during the previous 18 years on a remote finger of land jutting from the northern coast of Molokai. Perhaps it was some comfort to the peninsula's inhabitants to officially be deemed non-criminals, but they were still unmistakably prisoners, involuntarily plucked from parents, children and siblings and forced to serve indeterminate sentences.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
The Colony By John Tayman From 1866 through 1969, the Hawaiian and American governments banished nearly 9,000 leprosy sufferers into exile on a peninsula on the Hawaiian island of Molokai. Former Outside editor Tayman crafts a tale of fear, endurance and hope in telling the story of these unfortunate victims of ignorance (leprosy is caused by a simple bacterium and isn't nearly as contagious as was long believed). After a smallpox epidemic wiped out a fifth of the Hawaiian population in the 1850s, leprosy was seen as the next cataclysmic threat, and drastic measures were taken.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLLOVE and MICHAEL OLLOVE,SUN BOOK EDITOR | January 29, 2006
The Colony: The Harrowing True Story of the Exiles of Molokai John Tayman Scribner / 421 pages / $27.50 In 1884, the Hawaiian Supreme Court declared that contracting leprosy was not a crime. It only had to be treated as one. The ruling left everything as it had been during the previous 18 years on a remote finger of land jutting from the northern coast of Molokai. Perhaps it was some comfort to the peninsula's inhabitants to officially be deemed non-criminals, but they were still unmistakably prisoners, involuntarily plucked from parents, children and siblings and forced to serve indeterminate sentences.
NEWS
March 21, 1997
IN MEDICAL news often dominated by AIDS, cancer or other common killers in affluent countries, it is easy to overlook the damage done by diseases most of the world has forgotten about. But maladies like leprosy or river blindness still blight countless lives, and an opportunity to eradicate any tropical disease represents a bright ray of hope for many countries of the world.A research team at the World Health Organization sees a rare opportunity to attack and even eliminate four major diseases, affecting billions of people.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 25, 1998
RINCON, Cuba -- Pope John Paul II came here last night, to the Shrine of St. Lazarus, to encounter Cuba's "world of pain."The sick and lame come here every day, seeking healing through the intercession of St. Lazarus.Adjacent to the shrine, which is filled with tens of thousands of pilgrims on the saint's Dec. 16 feast day, sits the Hospital of Rincon, filled with lepers, victims of an affliction that the Bible treated as the most pathetic of diseases.The hospital, which has nearly 200 patients, has continued its mission since it was founded in 1714.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | December 16, 1991
Reports from southern Chile that the ozone hole has left sheep blinded by cataracts and some people blistered by sunburn are probably tall tales, scientists say, but they do expect skin cancer and cataract cases to begin rising sharply worldwide by the end of the century.In addition, the planet may see infectious diseases spread more quickly, the loss of animal and plant species and a reduction in crop yields, they say.Why? Because more ultraviolet radiation is now reaching the Earth as the protective ozone shield thins over most of the world.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1998
Consider a preposterous thought: God calls a general election. (Don't ask why, if you know what's good for you.) He orders every saint in heaven to form his or her own political party and sends them forth to campaign on Earth.Who do you think would get the most votes?St. John the Baptist? Now there's a strong contender. St. Francis of Assisi? Maybe, if birds could vote. St. Anthony, who some believe saved Little Italy from the Great Baltimore Fire of 1904? A hometown favorite at least.Though nobody could predict the outcome of such a hypothetical, not to say nonsensical, proposition, it's likely a formidable voting bloc would form up behind one name, at least in this country.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | May 13, 2005
The ancient scourge known as leprosy likely originated in either East Africa or Central Asia and extended its reach in a pattern mirroring human migration, according to a new analysis of its bacterial agent's unusual genetic fingerprint. The study, by researchers at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, suggests the disease reached West Africa and North America through infected explorers, traders or colonists within the past 500 years and infiltrated the Caribbean and South America via slave trade in the 18th century.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | November 18, 2001
Q. Is it true that thalidomide is effective against cancer? How does it work, and how safe is it? Doesn't thalidomide cause birth defects? A. Thalidomide was responsible for one of the most terrible drug disasters of the 20th century. When pregnant women took this medication as a sleeping pill, their babies were born with deformed limbs. Although it was banned for decades, thalidomide has been resurrected as a new treatment for cancer and leprosy. It is especially effective against a blood cancer called multiple myeloma.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1998
Consider a preposterous thought: God calls a general election. (Don't ask why, if you know what's good for you.) He orders every saint in heaven to form his or her own political party and sends them forth to campaign on Earth.Who do you think would get the most votes?St. John the Baptist? Now there's a strong contender. St. Francis of Assisi? Maybe, if birds could vote. St. Anthony, who some believe saved Little Italy from the Great Baltimore Fire of 1904? A hometown favorite at least.Though nobody could predict the outcome of such a hypothetical, not to say nonsensical, proposition, it's likely a formidable voting bloc would form up behind one name, at least in this country.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 25, 1998
RINCON, Cuba -- Pope John Paul II came here last night, to the Shrine of St. Lazarus, to encounter Cuba's "world of pain."The sick and lame come here every day, seeking healing through the intercession of St. Lazarus.Adjacent to the shrine, which is filled with tens of thousands of pilgrims on the saint's Dec. 16 feast day, sits the Hospital of Rincon, filled with lepers, victims of an affliction that the Bible treated as the most pathetic of diseases.The hospital, which has nearly 200 patients, has continued its mission since it was founded in 1714.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 24, 1997
PRETORIA, South Africa -- South Africa's only leper hospital, treating the afflicted for 125 years, will close next month, testimony to its own success and a dramatic global advance in treating the ancient scourge.The rambling institution with its dilapidated white rondawels -- small round cottages used 50 years ago to isolate people afflicted with leprosy -- is today all but deserted.On a given week, two dozen or so lepers are here for treatment at a single ward of the vast West Fort Hospital, which at its peak in the 1940s was treating 22,500 patients a year.
NEWS
March 21, 1997
IN MEDICAL news often dominated by AIDS, cancer or other common killers in affluent countries, it is easy to overlook the damage done by diseases most of the world has forgotten about. But maladies like leprosy or river blindness still blight countless lives, and an opportunity to eradicate any tropical disease represents a bright ray of hope for many countries of the world.A research team at the World Health Organization sees a rare opportunity to attack and even eliminate four major diseases, affecting billions of people.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 24, 1997
PRETORIA, South Africa -- South Africa's only leper hospital, treating the afflicted for 125 years, will close next month, testimony to its own success and a dramatic global advance in treating the ancient scourge.The rambling institution with its dilapidated white rondawels -- small round cottages used 50 years ago to isolate people afflicted with leprosy -- is today all but deserted.On a given week, two dozen or so lepers are here for treatment at a single ward of the vast West Fort Hospital, which at its peak in the 1940s was treating 22,500 patients a year.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Staff Correspondent | April 21, 1993
THIET, Sudan -- They are always there. They wait, watching, patient. Every now and again they soar from the treetops in lazy flight, as an owner might amble about to inspect his property.They will get their fill, the vultures of southern Sudan. Death is the only ample harvest in this land. The weak ones -- animal or human -- fall in the dirt, and there is often no extra strength to cover them.The giant birds may seem to smile as the world turns away. No one wants to hear of more people starving in Africa.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | December 16, 1991
Reports from southern Chile that the ozone hole has left sheep blinded by cataracts and some people blistered by sunburn are probably tall tales, scientists say, but they do expect skin cancer and cataract cases to begin rising sharply worldwide by the end of the century.In addition, the planet may see infectious diseases spread more quickly, the loss of animal and plant species and a reduction in crop yields, they say.Why? Because more ultraviolet radiation is now reaching the Earth as the protective ozone shield thins over most of the world.
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