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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 1999
The power of great music to focus the intellect and renew the soul is well-known. But as thermometers remain stuck in the high 90s and the humidity continues to oppress, it seems fair to ask whether the classics can also help cool us off. The answer, dear overheated reader, is yes. So without further ado, here are some musical suggestions for beating the heat in the oppressive summer of 1999. As its title suggests, one of the frostiest works in the classical canon is the "Sinfonia Antartica" of English composer Ralph Vaughan Williams.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
For a satisfying feast of prismatic colo rs and intricate designs, you can stop by one of our local museums any time. But this weekend, check out the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's program instead. So, OK, this is about aural hues and structures, rather than visual, but the effect is just as arresting. And, for those who still crave something to see, this concert offers that, too, in the form of projected images from the Hubble Telescope. They accompany a perennially popular sonic blockbuster from the orchestral repertoire, Gustav Holst's “The Planets.” But the fun starts long before that portion of the program.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
For a satisfying feast of prismatic colo rs and intricate designs, you can stop by one of our local museums any time. But this weekend, check out the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's program instead. So, OK, this is about aural hues and structures, rather than visual, but the effect is just as arresting. And, for those who still crave something to see, this concert offers that, too, in the form of projected images from the Hubble Telescope. They accompany a perennially popular sonic blockbuster from the orchestral repertoire, Gustav Holst's “The Planets.” But the fun starts long before that portion of the program.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 22, 2011
Louis R. "Lou" Mills Jr., a nationally known and highly regarded recording engineer who was called "Baltimore's Godfather of Sound" and whose Cold Spring Lane studio was a destination for stars and musicians, died Friday of a heart attack at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Mount Royal Terrace resident was 76. "Louis Mills was one of America's greatest recording engineers and a beloved, wonderful man who helped and inspired nearly everyone whose life he touched," said Tom D'Antoni, who had worked with Mr. Mills in Baltimore and is now editor-in-chief of oregonmusicnews.com, an online music magazine in Portland, Ore. "In all of my 35 years of broadcasting and media creation, I have never met a more talented recording engineer, or a nicer man," said Mr. D'Antoni.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | October 13, 1991
Christoph Eschenbach can explain why pianists often make good conductors."They're more concerned with architecture and color than other instrumentalists," says the 51-year-old conductor, who will lead Germany's Bamberg Symphony in a Dvorak-Shostakovich program this Thursday at the Naval Academy in Annapolis. "As a pianist you are not satisfied with a 'bang-bang-bang' tone -- you want to sound like an oboe, a cello, a clarinet, a trumpet. It's wonderful preparation for the orchestra."It may be that Eschenbach's right.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 22, 2011
Louis R. "Lou" Mills Jr., a nationally known and highly regarded recording engineer who was called "Baltimore's Godfather of Sound" and whose Cold Spring Lane studio was a destination for stars and musicians, died Friday of a heart attack at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Mount Royal Terrace resident was 76. "Louis Mills was one of America's greatest recording engineers and a beloved, wonderful man who helped and inspired nearly everyone whose life he touched," said Tom D'Antoni, who had worked with Mr. Mills in Baltimore and is now editor-in-chief of oregonmusicnews.com, an online music magazine in Portland, Ore. "In all of my 35 years of broadcasting and media creation, I have never met a more talented recording engineer, or a nicer man," said Mr. D'Antoni.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | September 16, 1990
From The Sun Sept. 16-22, 1840Sept. 17: The Western Savings Fund, located in North Gay Street, has given up the ghost. Some people have confounded (( this with the Western Mechanics' Savings Institution -- this is an error, the latter has not failed.Sept. 18: For insulting a magistrate in Baltimore last Saturday, Jos. Hankey was fined 500 pounds of tobacco and costs.From The Sun Sept. 16-22, 1890Sept. 20: President Gilman yesterday issued a circular announcing that the fifteenth academic year of the Johns Hopkins University would begin Wednesday morning, Oct. 1, and that all young men who wish to be received as students should previously apply by letter or in person.
FEATURES
By John Guinn and John Guinn,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 13, 1994
British maestro John Eliot Gardiner found a dictionary that defines the word "conductor" as "a current passed from one sphere to another."While that definition comes from physics, Mr. Gardiner maintains it's an apt way to characterize the person who stands in front of an orchestra and, through various bodily gyrations, gets that orchestra to produce musical sounds.Mr. Gardiner makes his observation in "The Art of Conducting: Great Conductors of the Past," a splendid video just released on the Teldec label.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | November 6, 2004
Few works that make up the standard, played-all-the-time symphony orchestra repertoire were premiered in the United States. But a perennial favorite, Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini by Sergei Rachmaninoff, received its first performance right here in Baltimore. Rachmaninoff himself was the soloist, appearing at the Lyric Theatre with the Philadelphia Orchestra conducted by Leopold Stokowski. To commemorate that premiere -- Nov. 7, 1934 -- a 5-foot-wide, 300-pound black granite engraved plaque will be unveiled 70 years later at the Lyric, where it will be permanently displayed.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | October 23, 1990
LOS ANGELES -- When the Hollywood Bowl begins its 1991 season, in early July, it will be home to not one but two full-fledged symphony orchestras.The formation of a second orchestra, to supplement the activities of the entrenched Los Angeles Philharmonic, was announced by Philharmonic executive director Ernest Fleischmann at a press conference last week on the Bowl stage.To be known as the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra, and with the renowned American conductor John Mauceri (pronounced "mow-CHAY-ree")
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 1999
The power of great music to focus the intellect and renew the soul is well-known. But as thermometers remain stuck in the high 90s and the humidity continues to oppress, it seems fair to ask whether the classics can also help cool us off. The answer, dear overheated reader, is yes. So without further ado, here are some musical suggestions for beating the heat in the oppressive summer of 1999. As its title suggests, one of the frostiest works in the classical canon is the "Sinfonia Antartica" of English composer Ralph Vaughan Williams.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | October 13, 1991
Christoph Eschenbach can explain why pianists often make good conductors."They're more concerned with architecture and color than other instrumentalists," says the 51-year-old conductor, who will lead Germany's Bamberg Symphony in a Dvorak-Shostakovich program this Thursday at the Naval Academy in Annapolis. "As a pianist you are not satisfied with a 'bang-bang-bang' tone -- you want to sound like an oboe, a cello, a clarinet, a trumpet. It's wonderful preparation for the orchestra."It may be that Eschenbach's right.
FEATURES
By STEVE MCKERROW MOVIES and STEVE MCKERROW MOVIES,BY THE EVENING SUN STAFF | October 20, 1990
TVHe may not be as universal as baseball, but Sylvester Stallone's "Rocky," below, is undeniably a national symbol of some kind. And if you are not into game four of the World Series (at 8 tonight, Channel 11), WNUV-Channel 54 is offering a chance to get to know Rocky Balboa a little better. An hourlong documentary, "Rocky, An American Hero," airs at 8, with Richard Crenna hosting a look at the "Rocky" film series. The show includes the gimmick of Stallone talking split-screen to his fighter alter-ego, and there is some predictable plugging for the upcoming "Rocky V," too. Following at 9 comes the screening of the original 1976 movie.
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