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October 28, 2004
On Tuesday, October 26, 2004, LEONID SHEVCHUK; beloved husband of Emona Shevchuk (nee Bakaleychik); loving father of Jon Taylor and Alex Shevchuk, both of Baltimore; dear father-in-law of Elina Shevchuk; adored brother of Maria Trellesky, Raisa Posin and Lucia, all of Russia; loving grandfather of Victoria and Dylan Shevchuk. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS INC, 8900 Reisterstown Rd, at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Thursday, October 28, at 9 A.M. Interment at Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, Berrymans Lane.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
The Full Beaver Moon comes Saturday, brightening the sky and unfortunately making the Leonid meteor shower's peak and Comet ISON more difficult to see. The moon will be full at 10:16 a.m. Sunday, which actually means Saturday night's moon will appear the closest to full.  The moon gets its name from the fact that November was the time of year fur trappers set their snares, before swamps froze, according to the Farmer's Almanac . November's full...
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NEWS
June 17, 2005
On Thursday, June 16, 2005, LEONID LOMONOSOV; beloved husband of the late Galina Lomonosov; loving father of Marina Schaum of Finksburg, MD and Alex Lomonosov of New Market, MD; dear father-in-law of Gerald Schaum and Trish Lomonosov; loving grandfather of Anna and Gabby Hiken and Matthew Schaum. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Friday, June 17 at 1 P.M. Interment at Har Sinai Congregation Cemetery, Garrison Forest Road. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in his memory to the American Diabetes Association of Maryland, 3120 Timanus Lane, #106, Baltimore, MD (21244-2883)
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
One of the best shows of the annual Leonid meteor shower is expected this weekend, though it won't be a spectacular in North America as it will in Asia. The Leonids traditionally make an appearance in the pre-dawn sky this time of year as earth passes through the trail of the Comet Tempel-Tuttle, which visits our solar system once every 33 years. The bits of comet burn up as they enter the earth's atmosphere, giving them the appearance of "shooting stars. " Like most meteor showers, they get their name from the constellation from which they appear to emanate -- Leo the lion in this case.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | November 15, 1993
The annual Leonid meteor shower is due to be at its peak tomorrow. But astronomers aren't forecasting any space spectaculars like the Perseid meteor "storm" that flopped in August."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
A Maryland astronomer working in a back yard near Mount Airy during last month's Leonid meteor shower has been credited with making the first confirmed pictures of meteors smashing into the moon.David Dunham of Greenbelt said a starlike flash on the videotape he shot Nov. 17 closely matches the time of a flash seen independently from Texas. Since then, his tape has confirmed five more impacts videotaped independently by Leonid-watchers in Texas, Mexico and Maryland."I think this is the nail in the coffin," said Dunham, a space mission designer at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1997
The Leonid meteor shower makes its annual return early Monday, and astronomers hope it will bring as many as 80 to 100 "shooting stars" an hour.That would be six to 10 times the Leonids' normal rate, and continue the buildup toward an eagerly anticipated meteor "storm" at this time next year, or in 1999. That event could bring hundreds or thousands of meteors an hour.But this year's bright moonlight might dim the show and prove a disappointment to some sky-watchers."I don't want to raise their expectations," said Donald K. Yeomans, a senior research scientist at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1999
The Leonid meteor storm blew itself out over Europe and the Middle East yesterday morning, leaving barely a trickle of shooting stars for everyone else.While observers in Spain, Portugal and the Near East were dazzled by hundreds or even thousands of meteors an hour, Americans were lucky to see 20."It was very cold, and I froze my tush off," said a disappointed Howard Albert of Bel Air. He saw seven or eight meteors during the hour he spent watching from his back yard.Philip Plait, an astronomer at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, called it "a pretty weak show."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1998
Stargazers can't wait for it. Professional astronomers are flying to the Far East for a better look. But satellite operators are biting their nails.They're all gearing up for this year's annual Leonid meteor shower Nov. 17, and it could be one to remember.This year's Leonids could produce their most intense and beautiful barrage in 32 years -- hundreds or even thousands of meteors per hour over Eastern Asia and the Western Pacific as Earth plows through the trail of Comet Tempel-Tuttle. There might even be some delightful leftovers for the rest of us.But in space, hundreds of scientific, military and communications satellites will come under fire from high-speed particles and pebbles ejected by the comet.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1998
Planning to wish on a falling star? It could make a lot of difference where you are -- particularly the next two nights.The Leonids are coming.The annual meteor shower from the constellation Leo reaches the peak of its 33 1/4 -year cycle tomorrow, and heading away from city lights is the intention of local sky-watchers hoping to see hundreds or even thousands of shooting stars.Some plan to camp out tonight and tomorrow -- starting at midnight, when the head of the lion (resembling a backward question mark)
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
The Leonid meteor shower peaks early Tuesday. Asia has the best view, but Marylanders could see rates topping 20 per hour between midnight and dawn on the 17th. No moon will interfere. If clouds threaten, try a day or two before or after the peak. Leonids emanate from Leo (NE after midnight), but can light up anywhere. Find a dark spot, dress warmly, stretch out, enjoy. Up-to-the-minute local data and radar at marylandweather.com
NEWS
June 17, 2005
On Thursday, June 16, 2005, LEONID LOMONOSOV; beloved husband of the late Galina Lomonosov; loving father of Marina Schaum of Finksburg, MD and Alex Lomonosov of New Market, MD; dear father-in-law of Gerald Schaum and Trish Lomonosov; loving grandfather of Anna and Gabby Hiken and Matthew Schaum. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Friday, June 17 at 1 P.M. Interment at Har Sinai Congregation Cemetery, Garrison Forest Road. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in his memory to the American Diabetes Association of Maryland, 3120 Timanus Lane, #106, Baltimore, MD (21244-2883)
NEWS
October 28, 2004
On Tuesday, October 26, 2004, LEONID SHEVCHUK; beloved husband of Emona Shevchuk (nee Bakaleychik); loving father of Jon Taylor and Alex Shevchuk, both of Baltimore; dear father-in-law of Elina Shevchuk; adored brother of Maria Trellesky, Raisa Posin and Lucia, all of Russia; loving grandfather of Victoria and Dylan Shevchuk. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS INC, 8900 Reisterstown Rd, at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Thursday, October 28, at 9 A.M. Interment at Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, Berrymans Lane.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2002
The last, best Leonid meteor shower for at least the next 96 years was clouded out across most of Europe and fell well short of scientists' expectations across North America. Although scientists got the timing right, the Leonids appeared at rates of several hundred to a thousand an hour in most locations, instead of the thousands predicted by the top computer models. Even so, yesterday's display was more than enough to dazzle the hardy Marylanders who braved the cold and wished away some pesky clouds to watch the early-morning spectacle from Alpha Ridge Park in Howard County.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2002
If the skies clear and the cosmos cooperates, Marylanders who sacrifice some sleep early Tuesday could experience the most spectacular display of celestial fireworks in their lifetime. The annual Leonid meteor shower, which last November unleashed hundreds of "shooting stars" an hour in the skies over Maryland, is expected to peak again early Tuesday at "storm" intensities - as many as 5,000 an hour. Even though the glare of the full moon could obscure many of the fainter streaks of light, scientists say, sky-watchers who get up to watch the show still should see more than 3,000 meteors an hour - up to 55 a minute.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2001
In New Mexico, coyotes howled at the meteor-streaked heavens. But in many parts of the East Coast it was human stargazers doing the howling, disappointed by thick fog that obscured an eagerly anticipated celestial show. At a local astronomy club's "star party" in a dark corner of Carroll County near Westminster, most serious astronomy buffs left early, their high expectations for this year's Leonid meteor shower dashed. But those who stayed behind, many of them astronomical novices, said the display was worth missing a night's sleep.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1999
Abolitionist Frederick Douglass saw them while a slave on Maryland's Eastern Shore. He was filled with awe.A young Abraham Lincoln saw them after he was rousted from his bed in New Salem, Ill., by a church deacon proclaiming the end of the world.Across North America, people fell to their knees in prayer or terror, or rose from their beds in wonder at a night sky suddenly filled with falling stars.It was the Great Leonid Meteor Storm of Nov. 13, 1833. It was decades before scientists came to understand the event as an extreme variant of an annual November meteor shower.
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