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Leonardo Da Vinci

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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 2, 2003
A searcher after unfathomable things, a painter of disquieting smiles that suggest the riddles of human personality, and of hands that point to mysteries beyond the earth, he seemed to his contemporaries a sort of magician, and to men in later centuries an Italian Faust."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
They have so much in common, these three long-dead holy women, their corpses dripping with jewels, that it's as though they've been calling back and forth to one another from across the centuries. Now that their images are in the same room at the American Visionary Art Museum , the murmur of their voices is almost audible. There's St. Kateri, holding a bouquet of her talisman - lilies - and reciting the Lord's Prayer in the Mohawk language. Embedded in the icon is a vial of water taken from the spring where Kateri lived in the 17th century.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | January 30, 2009
If skies clear tonight, look for a slender crescent moon alongside brilliant Venus, high in the southwestern sky after sunset. Look closely for the faint outline of the "dark" portion of the moon's disk, the part that is not bathed in direct sunlight. It's dimly illuminated by "earthshine" -- sunlight bounced off the Earth onto the moon's surface. Leonardo da Vinci was the first to explain the phenomenon.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | November 15, 2013
Michael Phelps has nothing left to prove in a swimming pool. His place in Olympic history is assured, and anything he might accomplish during the 2016 games in Rio de Janeiro - if he should decide to try and add to his record medal count - would just be, well, treading water. That said, if you're looking for someone to beg him to stay on the golf course, you came to the wrong place. Phelps has earned the right to never dip his toe into chlorinated water again if that's what he wants, but there is no reason for a 28-year-old guy to stop doing what he has done better than anyone as long as he still enjoys training and competing.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 19, 2007
Leonardo da Vinci thought that our souls are composed of harmony. Whenever I hear music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart or Anton Bruckner, I'm inclined to agree. If you go The BSO performs at 8 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Sunday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 8 p.m. Saturday at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda. $25-$55. 410-783-8000, baltimoresymphony.org.
TRAVEL
By LORI SEARS and LORI SEARS,SUN REPORTER | December 25, 2005
`Garden in Lights' Enter a lighted winter wonderland at Annmarie Garden in Solomons. Drive through the annual "Garden in Lights," and you'll venture into a winter garden of lighted holiday decorations. On view nightly through Jan. 1, the holiday display features themed areas, including "A Trip to the Zoo" with elephants, giraffes and other creatures in lights, "Rockefeller Center" with brightly lit skaters, fountains and a city skyline, and "Fantasyland" with lighted fairies, gnomes and dragons.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | November 15, 2013
Michael Phelps has nothing left to prove in a swimming pool. His place in Olympic history is assured, and anything he might accomplish during the 2016 games in Rio de Janeiro - if he should decide to try and add to his record medal count - would just be, well, treading water. That said, if you're looking for someone to beg him to stay on the golf course, you came to the wrong place. Phelps has earned the right to never dip his toe into chlorinated water again if that's what he wants, but there is no reason for a 28-year-old guy to stop doing what he has done better than anyone as long as he still enjoys training and competing.
NEWS
By Andrew C. Revkin and Andrew C. Revkin,New York Times News Service | August 4, 1999
BEACON, N.Y. -- Five hundred years ago, Leonardo da Vinci's long-held plan to cast a 24-foot-tall bronze horse for his patron, Duke Lodovico Sforza of Milan, crumbled when invading French troops used the full-size clay model for crossbow practice.Leonardo never completed the piece, which would have been the largest equestrian sculpture in the world, and some biographical accounts have him crying on his deathbed over the unfulfilled vision.Leonardo's dream, first articulated as a postage-stamp-size sketch, was revealed in three jaw-dropping dimensions, in the form of a proudly prancing 15-ton bronze stallion that was cast and assembled at a foundry here, 60 miles north of New York City.
FEATURES
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 6, 1997
It's a portrait of genius.In 15,000 square feet of paintings, drawings, artifacts, working models of extraordinary inventions, theatrical presentations and interactive displays, the Boston Museum of Science is presenting in its only American venue nothing less than the life and work of perhaps the greatest genius of Western civilization: Leonardo da Vinci, the original Renaissance Man.Somehow, 15,000 square feet doesn't seem sufficient.Called "Leonardo da Vinci: Scientist, Inventor, Artist," the show could just as logically have its title reversed.
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2001
It is widely viewed - more widely, of course, when the temperature hits 99 degrees - as one of the greatest inventions of the 20th century. Without air conditioning, Houston would still be a cow town, glass skyscrapers wouldn't grace city skylines, and people like Marlene Kells and family would have no refuge from the oppressive heat and humidity that blanketed Baltimore this week. "We take turns going in that room," Kells said as she sat outside her rowhouse on South Hanover Street, drinking Pepsi on ice and pointing up to the droning window unit in her second-floor bedroom.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | January 30, 2009
If skies clear tonight, look for a slender crescent moon alongside brilliant Venus, high in the southwestern sky after sunset. Look closely for the faint outline of the "dark" portion of the moon's disk, the part that is not bathed in direct sunlight. It's dimly illuminated by "earthshine" -- sunlight bounced off the Earth onto the moon's surface. Leonardo da Vinci was the first to explain the phenomenon.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 19, 2007
Leonardo da Vinci thought that our souls are composed of harmony. Whenever I hear music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart or Anton Bruckner, I'm inclined to agree. If you go The BSO performs at 8 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Sunday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 8 p.m. Saturday at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda. $25-$55. 410-783-8000, baltimoresymphony.org.
TRAVEL
By LORI SEARS and LORI SEARS,SUN REPORTER | December 25, 2005
`Garden in Lights' Enter a lighted winter wonderland at Annmarie Garden in Solomons. Drive through the annual "Garden in Lights," and you'll venture into a winter garden of lighted holiday decorations. On view nightly through Jan. 1, the holiday display features themed areas, including "A Trip to the Zoo" with elephants, giraffes and other creatures in lights, "Rockefeller Center" with brightly lit skaters, fountains and a city skyline, and "Fantasyland" with lighted fairies, gnomes and dragons.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 2, 2003
A searcher after unfathomable things, a painter of disquieting smiles that suggest the riddles of human personality, and of hands that point to mysteries beyond the earth, he seemed to his contemporaries a sort of magician, and to men in later centuries an Italian Faust."
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2001
It is widely viewed - more widely, of course, when the temperature hits 99 degrees - as one of the greatest inventions of the 20th century. Without air conditioning, Houston would still be a cow town, glass skyscrapers wouldn't grace city skylines, and people like Marlene Kells and family would have no refuge from the oppressive heat and humidity that blanketed Baltimore this week. "We take turns going in that room," Kells said as she sat outside her rowhouse on South Hanover Street, drinking Pepsi on ice and pointing up to the droning window unit in her second-floor bedroom.
NEWS
By Andrew C. Revkin and Andrew C. Revkin,New York Times News Service | August 4, 1999
BEACON, N.Y. -- Five hundred years ago, Leonardo da Vinci's long-held plan to cast a 24-foot-tall bronze horse for his patron, Duke Lodovico Sforza of Milan, crumbled when invading French troops used the full-size clay model for crossbow practice.Leonardo never completed the piece, which would have been the largest equestrian sculpture in the world, and some biographical accounts have him crying on his deathbed over the unfulfilled vision.Leonardo's dream, first articulated as a postage-stamp-size sketch, was revealed in three jaw-dropping dimensions, in the form of a proudly prancing 15-ton bronze stallion that was cast and assembled at a foundry here, 60 miles north of New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
They have so much in common, these three long-dead holy women, their corpses dripping with jewels, that it's as though they've been calling back and forth to one another from across the centuries. Now that their images are in the same room at the American Visionary Art Museum , the murmur of their voices is almost audible. There's St. Kateri, holding a bouquet of her talisman - lilies - and reciting the Lord's Prayer in the Mohawk language. Embedded in the icon is a vial of water taken from the spring where Kateri lived in the 17th century.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 6, 2009
Series Chuck:: Scott Bakula and Chevy Chase guest star on a new episode. (8 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) House:: The singer-actor known as Meat Loaf guest stars on a new episode of the medical drama. (8 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) The Hills:: The reality series about the lives and loves of the young and vacuous returns. (10 p.m., MTV) Specials The Da Vinci Shroud:: Experts seek a connection between Leonardo da Vinci and the Shroud of Turin in this special. (9 p.m., Discovery) Movies The Wild One:: Turner Classic Movies kicks off a biker movie marathon with this 1954 classic starring Marlon Brando.
FEATURES
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 6, 1997
It's a portrait of genius.In 15,000 square feet of paintings, drawings, artifacts, working models of extraordinary inventions, theatrical presentations and interactive displays, the Boston Museum of Science is presenting in its only American venue nothing less than the life and work of perhaps the greatest genius of Western civilization: Leonardo da Vinci, the original Renaissance Man.Somehow, 15,000 square feet doesn't seem sufficient.Called "Leonardo da Vinci: Scientist, Inventor, Artist," the show could just as logically have its title reversed.
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