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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
For many of us, Leonard Bernstein will always loom large. The conductor/composer/mentor/mensch left an enormous mark not just on the classical music and theater worlds, but on the world, period. I owe a lot of my own views about music and, especially, music-making to Bernstein. Although I only met him once, and all too briefly, during a crazy evening that started at the Kennedy Center and ended up at the Watergate Hotel (no, silly, not that kind of evening), I came to feel that he was a part of my life somehow.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
For many of us, Leonard Bernstein will always loom large. The conductor/composer/mentor/mensch left an enormous mark not just on the classical music and theater worlds, but on the world, period. I owe a lot of my own views about music and, especially, music-making to Bernstein. Although I only met him once, and all too briefly, during a crazy evening that started at the Kennedy Center and ended up at the Watergate Hotel (no, silly, not that kind of evening), I came to feel that he was a part of my life somehow.
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By John Guinn and John Guinn,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 9, 1992
On Aug. 25, he would have celebrated his 74th birthday, this most gifted of American musicians.Instead, we have been without the vibrant presence of Leonard Bernstein since his death on Oct. 14, 1990. We have not, fortunately, been without his myriad talents, although they now must come to us via laser beams and videotapes.Bernstein's physical absence has not resulted in a diminishing of his presence in our musical life. In fact, judging from the steady stream of Bernstein-related items that crosses my desk, the business of keeping his memory alive is one of the healthiest aspects of our musical economy.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Officially, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's 2013-14 season opened last week. Musically, I'd say it really got going last night, when the ensemble kicked into high gear to deliver sterling performances of works by Leonard Bernstein and Maurice Ravel. Music director Marin Alsop has given Bernstein, her mentor, a prominent place in the BSO's programming and discography -- a Naxos recording of his compelling "Mass" earned a Grammy nomination a few years ago. This week, Alsop is focusing on the composer's Symphony No. 2, "Age of Anxiety," which Naxos will record during concerts at Meyerhoff Hall Friday and Saturday.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | October 10, 1990
Leonard Bernstein, perhaps the most famous musician in the history of the United States, announced yesterday that he was retiring from conducting for health reasons.The announcement, which was made by his public relations firm, quoted his doctor as saying that Mr. Bernstein suffered from "progressive emphysema, complicated by a pleural tumor and a series of pulmonary infections."The conductor has canceled all scheduled engagements. His doctor said that only rest and recuperation will permit Mr. Bernstein -- the composer of several Broadway musicals, including "West Side Story" -- to return to a limited schedule that would include writing, composing and teaching.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | October 15, 1990
Leonard Bernstein, one of the most versatile and brilliant musicians in this nation's history, died yesterday at the age of 72 of cardiac arrest at his home in New York. His death came only five days after an announcement that he was retiring from conducting.His physician, in whose presence he died, had said that Mr. Bernstein's health -- he was suffering from emphysema, pulmonary infections and a lung tumor -- made it too difficult for him to continue conducting.But if Mr. Bernstein, who had a four-pack-a-day cigarette habit, was struck down by an excess of illnesses, he had been blessed -- some would say cursed -- by a multitude of talents.
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By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 2000
THE HISTORY of Brooklyn Park can be more interesting than one might think. During the course of meetings of the Brooklyn Park High School Alumni Association, Pearl Carpenter (Class of '57) mentioned that Leonard Bernstein had performed there. Leonard Bernstein? In Brooklyn Park? At the high school? That was my first reaction, but -- believe it or not -- he was. If anyone has any doubts, just ask Carpenter. In 1956, Bernstein performed with the National Symphony in a young people's concert there.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | December 18, 2007
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will help pay tribute to Leonard Bernstein at New York's Carnegie Hall next season, performing his eclectic Mass with the Morgan State University Choir and Brooklyn (N.Y.) Youth Chorus. BSO music director and Bernstein protege Marin Alsop will conduct the Carnegie performance Oct. 24, as well as another concert the next day at the United Palace Theater, a restored vaudeville/movie venue in the uptown New York neighborhood of Washington Heights. The second performance will involve hundreds of New York City public-school students.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 25, 2002
NEW YORK - Adolph Green, the playwright, performer and lyricist who in a six-decade collaboration with Betty Comden was co-author of such hit Broadway musicals as On the Town, Wonderful Town and Bells Are Ringing and the screenplays for Singin' in the Rain and The Band Wagon, died yesterday at his home in Manhattan. He was 87. Ms. Comden and Mr. Green wrote the words for much of the Broadway show music written by Leonard Bernstein, Jule Styne, Cy Coleman, Andre Previn, Morton Gould, Saul Chaplin, John Frank and Roger Edens.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 12, 2008
Make us grow in love - from Eucharistic Prayer II, Roman Catholic Mass When Leonard Bernstein undertook to create a work for the opening of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, it was inevitable that he would think big. Very big. The result was Mass, subtitled A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers. There has never been, and probably never will be, anything quite like it. Since its premiere Sept. 8, 1971, it has generated mixed reactions, from ecstatic to dismissive.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Marin Alsop's tenure as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has been notable for several things, prominent among them the programming of compositions by Leonard Bernstein, her childhood idol and mentor when she was starting her conducting career in the 1980s. Among the most sizzling performances the BSO has given with Alsop over the years have been those of Bernstein works - the genre-bending "Mass" and two of his three emotionally complex symphonies, No. 1, "Jeremiah," and No. 3, "Kaddish.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2012
These dog days of summer, when concert halls are terribly quiet around here, are a perfect time for classical music fans to do a little homework that will pay off in the new season. Folks who have never heard, say, Leonard Bernstein's "Kaddish" Symphony, or any other off-the-beaten-path works scheduled in the months ahead can get a lot more out of those experiences with some preparation now. Let's face it: Audiences don't spend much time diligently reading their program books before a performance starts.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 23, 2011
Loraine P. Bernstein, a musical trust's administrator who assisted young musicians in gaining an audience, died of a heart attack Tuesday at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 82. Born Loraine Panek in Warehouse Point, Conn., she was the youngest of three children of Polish immigrant farmers who raised vegetables and cigar tobacco in the Connecticut River Valley. "She was a child of the Depression and had lots of stories about the farm she used to her advantage during my childhood," said her son, Richard M. Bernstein of Freeland.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
NEW YORK - "This is exactly what my father wanted," Jamie Bernstein said yesterday afternoon, wiping away tears after a gripping performance of Leonard Bernstein's Mass led by Marin Alsop in the vast, gilded United Palace Theater at 175th St. and Broadway. "This was incredible," the composer's daughter said. That performance, attended by more than 3,000 people, found the stage crammed with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the Morgan State University Choir and the large cast that, on Friday night, had brought down a sold-out house at Carnegie Hall that included actor Alec Baldwin and writer Anna Quindlen.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 12, 2008
Make us grow in love - from Eucharistic Prayer II, Roman Catholic Mass When Leonard Bernstein undertook to create a work for the opening of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, it was inevitable that he would think big. Very big. The result was Mass, subtitled A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers. There has never been, and probably never will be, anything quite like it. Since its premiere Sept. 8, 1971, it has generated mixed reactions, from ecstatic to dismissive.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | December 18, 2007
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will help pay tribute to Leonard Bernstein at New York's Carnegie Hall next season, performing his eclectic Mass with the Morgan State University Choir and Brooklyn (N.Y.) Youth Chorus. BSO music director and Bernstein protege Marin Alsop will conduct the Carnegie performance Oct. 24, as well as another concert the next day at the United Palace Theater, a restored vaudeville/movie venue in the uptown New York neighborhood of Washington Heights. The second performance will involve hundreds of New York City public-school students.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 28, 1998
I don't expect transcendence in a TV documentary.Get the facts right, create an engaging narrative in which to present them, be honest with the audience, and connect a few dots that I might not have connected myself. Do that, and I'm happy.So, I am delirious, enraptured and just plain cuckoo about "Leonard Bernstein: Reaching for the Note," a two-hour film portrait of one of the great figures of postwar American life, airing on PBS tonight. "Reaching for the Note" has at least three moments of transcendence and each is from a different realm of Bernstein's fabulous musical career and troubled life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 20, 2000
He was a walking - sometimes gyrating - paradox. He could be petulant, witty, self-indulgent, generous, bitter, tender, incredibly energetic, deeply depressed. A compulsive artist who wanted to go on creating forever, he also persisted in smoking even when he knew the fatal dangers it posed. A proud Jew, he also loved the music of the notoriously anti-Semitic Richard Wagner and created a philosophically penetrating musical/theater setting of the Roman Catholic Mass. An erudite discourser on culture, politics and world affairs, he also could recite an amazing repertoire of deliciously dirty limericks.
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