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Leon Panetta

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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Leon Panetta's tough talk about appropriations bills isn't likely to cause much fear and trembling in Congress. The question is whether President Clinton will live up to the rhetoric of his chief of staff.The president earned a reputation early in his stewardship for being too ready to change his mind or compromise when confronted. That was the case, for example, when he yielded to pressure and dropped an energy tax from his first budget plan two years ago. And he has reinforced the image since the Republicans won control of Congress eight months ago.The predictable result is a demoralized Democratic minority in Congress with no clear picture of where Clinton stands.
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NEWS
January 7, 2009
Leon E. Panetta has shown himself to be an astute, accomplished and politically adept public servant. But all his management skills and political acumen can't make up for what he lacks as President-elect Barack Obama's nominee to lead the Central Intelligence Agency - real experience in the spy business. The much-maligned agency gets more right than it gets credit for and could use an outsider to assess its problems and challenges in the post-9/11 world. But without a mastery of the basic techniques of intelligence-gathering and an understanding of the conflicts within the bureaucracy, Mr. Panetta would be hard-pressed to inspire its professionals and re-invigorate their pursuit of its mission.
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 11, 1996
Leon Panetta has a job to do in California before returning to the White House in another capacity.If Palestinians and Israelis want to make peace, they will have to do it on their own. They won't have Warren Christopher to make them.Continuity means keeping Chairman Helms' hand at the tiller of foreign policy.If baseball owners balk again, players will walk again.Pub Date: 11/11/96
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 11, 1996
Leon Panetta has a job to do in California before returning to the White House in another capacity.If Palestinians and Israelis want to make peace, they will have to do it on their own. They won't have Warren Christopher to make them.Continuity means keeping Chairman Helms' hand at the tiller of foreign policy.If baseball owners balk again, players will walk again.Pub Date: 11/11/96
NEWS
November 11, 1996
HISTORY might well record that the turnabout in the Clinton administration that led to the president's re-election last Tuesday really began with the June 1994 appointment of Leon Panetta as White House chief of staff. At that time, the Republican takeover of Congress still lay ahead of the Democratic chief executive. But when that challenge came, mostly because of Mr. Panetta's influence, the White House had changed from an Arkansas amateur show into an astute, Washington-savvy operation.
NEWS
By New Orleans Times-Picayune | February 20, 1992
BIG CITIES and small towns alike across the country are beset by many of the same problems: deteriorating infrastructures, crime, weak to dying economies.All of the candidates, including President Bush, talk about the need to create "jobs, jobs, jobs" in general terms. But little is said specifically about the need to revitalize the economies of the cities and small towns.Enter the nation's mayors. They have a plan they say would create 280,500 jobs this year and help lift the nation out of recession.
NEWS
June 28, 1994
As the White House chief of staff job passed yesterday from that good old Arkansas boy, Mack McLarty, to that savvy old Washington hand, Leon Panetta, one question regarding the education of a president was bound to arise. Why Mr. McLarty in the first place? After Jimmy Carter's experience with his Georgia sidekick, Hamilton Jordan, you would think Bill Clinton might have learned. For manager of the White House staff, a president needs someone who knows his way around the federal government and who is well aware of the vicious underside of life in the nation's capital.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | June 29, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Just days after President Clinton replaces White House Chief of Staff Mack McLarty with Leon Panetta, the effects already are evident:In Secaucus, N.J., a manufacturer of novelty goods decides to hire six new employees for his wax lips division."
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
To: All Security PersonnelFrom: Bill ClintonRe: White House ProtectionAs you know, another deranged individual, quite likely a Republican, has threatened the well-being of the president of the United States and his family.In this latest incident, a man fired 20 or 30 rounds from an assault rifle at the White House before being subdued by two tourists. As a token of appreciation, I have authorized that both these brave citizens receive complimentary "Welcome to Our Nation's Capital!" ballpoint pens.
NEWS
January 7, 2009
Leon E. Panetta has shown himself to be an astute, accomplished and politically adept public servant. But all his management skills and political acumen can't make up for what he lacks as President-elect Barack Obama's nominee to lead the Central Intelligence Agency - real experience in the spy business. The much-maligned agency gets more right than it gets credit for and could use an outsider to assess its problems and challenges in the post-9/11 world. But without a mastery of the basic techniques of intelligence-gathering and an understanding of the conflicts within the bureaucracy, Mr. Panetta would be hard-pressed to inspire its professionals and re-invigorate their pursuit of its mission.
NEWS
November 11, 1996
HISTORY might well record that the turnabout in the Clinton administration that led to the president's re-election last Tuesday really began with the June 1994 appointment of Leon Panetta as White House chief of staff. At that time, the Republican takeover of Congress still lay ahead of the Democratic chief executive. But when that challenge came, mostly because of Mr. Panetta's influence, the White House had changed from an Arkansas amateur show into an astute, Washington-savvy operation.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Leon Panetta's tough talk about appropriations bills isn't likely to cause much fear and trembling in Congress. The question is whether President Clinton will live up to the rhetoric of his chief of staff.The president earned a reputation early in his stewardship for being too ready to change his mind or compromise when confronted. That was the case, for example, when he yielded to pressure and dropped an energy tax from his first budget plan two years ago. And he has reinforced the image since the Republicans won control of Congress eight months ago.The predictable result is a demoralized Democratic minority in Congress with no clear picture of where Clinton stands.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
To: All Security PersonnelFrom: Bill ClintonRe: White House ProtectionAs you know, another deranged individual, quite likely a Republican, has threatened the well-being of the president of the United States and his family.In this latest incident, a man fired 20 or 30 rounds from an assault rifle at the White House before being subdued by two tourists. As a token of appreciation, I have authorized that both these brave citizens receive complimentary "Welcome to Our Nation's Capital!" ballpoint pens.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | June 29, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Just days after President Clinton replaces White House Chief of Staff Mack McLarty with Leon Panetta, the effects already are evident:In Secaucus, N.J., a manufacturer of novelty goods decides to hire six new employees for his wax lips division."
NEWS
June 28, 1994
As the White House chief of staff job passed yesterday from that good old Arkansas boy, Mack McLarty, to that savvy old Washington hand, Leon Panetta, one question regarding the education of a president was bound to arise. Why Mr. McLarty in the first place? After Jimmy Carter's experience with his Georgia sidekick, Hamilton Jordan, you would think Bill Clinton might have learned. For manager of the White House staff, a president needs someone who knows his way around the federal government and who is well aware of the vicious underside of life in the nation's capital.
NEWS
By New Orleans Times-Picayune | February 20, 1992
BIG CITIES and small towns alike across the country are beset by many of the same problems: deteriorating infrastructures, crime, weak to dying economies.All of the candidates, including President Bush, talk about the need to create "jobs, jobs, jobs" in general terms. But little is said specifically about the need to revitalize the economies of the cities and small towns.Enter the nation's mayors. They have a plan they say would create 280,500 jobs this year and help lift the nation out of recession.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 13, 1993
We are not supposed to blame Bill. It's Leon Panetta wh canceled Bill's campaign promises.Ross Perot is back in the game. What game, he will, presumably, eventually make clear.Karadzic and Milosevic have perfected a good-Serb, bad-Serb routine that works every time.Cheer up, Little Rock, your ordeal is nearly over.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 12, 1994
If only Harry Truman were in the White House, he would invoke the Taft-Hartley Act, declare a national emergency, seize the clubs, draft the players and say, "Play ball!"The NAACP has gone to war against the NAACP.Leon Panetta is taking charge. He may even fire Bill.An agency no one heard of built a $310 million spy shop without telling Congress and to evade prying eyes put it next to Dulles Airport. And to think we won the Cold War.
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