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Leo Tolstoy

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By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 9, 1996
YASNAYA POLYANA, Russia -- Deep in the Russian countryside, among the birch trees and pine forests that unfailingly stir the Russian soul, a resonant voice is being heard once more.It is a voice that speaks of love and nonviolence, one that celebrates the simple life and the moral purity that comes with living close to nature. It is the voice of one of the world's greatest writers, Leo Tolstoy.Tolstoy was born here, at his family's estate, in 1828 and wrote his greatest works, "War and Peace" and "Anna Karenina," here.
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NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | June 7, 2013
Baltimore city schools CEO Andres Alonso tapped his favorite coming-of-age book by Leo Tolstoy to impart some lasting wisdom, and extend a final farewell, to city students as he closes out his last school year. In a letter addressed to city students Friday afternoon , Alonso said, "as I prepare to leave Baltimore City Public Schools after six years as CEO, I think mainly of you. " Alonso explained the love of books and reading he developed as a child, recalling how his father gave him four books as gifts on his first day of school.
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FEATURES
By The Literary Almanac | July 26, 1998
Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910)was born in Yasnaya Polyana, Russia, into an aristocratic family. Orphaned at 9, he was brought up by an elderly aunt and studied at Kazan University, but did not graduate. After several aimless years in town and countryside, Tolstoy served as an officer in the Caucasus, wrote his first novels, and after the Crimean War retired as commander. He returned to St. Petersburg a literary star, traveled abroad and married Sophie Behrs in 1862. They had 13 children. He is best remembered for some of the most important fiction ever written - "War and Peace" (1869)
NEWS
December 23, 2007
Andres Alonso and his family left Cuba when he was 12. He arrived in Union City, N.J., speaking no English but found mentors in the public schools who saw his potential and encouraged him to apply to Columbia University. He graduated from Columbia magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, then earned a law degree from Harvard University. "With me, there were people who saw beyond a language problem, people who saw beyond the poverty," he said. Alonso, who is 50, was deputy chancellor of the New York City public school system before taking charge of the Baltimore system this year.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | June 7, 2013
Baltimore city schools CEO Andres Alonso tapped his favorite coming-of-age book by Leo Tolstoy to impart some lasting wisdom, and extend a final farewell, to city students as he closes out his last school year. In a letter addressed to city students Friday afternoon , Alonso said, "as I prepare to leave Baltimore City Public Schools after six years as CEO, I think mainly of you. " Alonso explained the love of books and reading he developed as a child, recalling how his father gave him four books as gifts on his first day of school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 21, 2003
Madame Bovary, C'est Moi: The Great Characters of Literature and Where They Came From, by Andre Bernard. Norton. 128 pages. $19.95. "If Godot were God," Samuel Beckett famously and defiantly declared, "I would have called him that." And Beckett thus left the puzzle forever unexplained. Andre Bernard, the trade publisher at Harcourt and a columnist for The American Scholar, has put together a bouquet of literary anecdotes and confections that concentrates on the origins of illustrious names in novels -- but goes delightfully further, including lists, quotes and quips ("I cannot tear myself away from living creatures to bother about imaginary ones."
NEWS
December 23, 2007
Andres Alonso and his family left Cuba when he was 12. He arrived in Union City, N.J., speaking no English but found mentors in the public schools who saw his potential and encouraged him to apply to Columbia University. He graduated from Columbia magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, then earned a law degree from Harvard University. "With me, there were people who saw beyond a language problem, people who saw beyond the poverty," he said. Alonso, who is 50, was deputy chancellor of the New York City public school system before taking charge of the Baltimore system this year.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - First, an interior door starts to shake, rattling a loose key in the lock. Then the walls throb as the concussion of U.S. bombs rumbles like a wave washing over the city. The terrifying sound sends a 14-year-old girl into her mother's arms. The teen-ager holds her ears like a toddler. The scene, during an airstrike yesterday afternoon, has become routine for the Al-Ali family and in thousands of other homes around the city. Most of the bombing appears to be done with precision.
NEWS
By Erika Hayasaki and Erika Hayasaki,Los Angeles Times | April 22, 2007
NEW YORK -- Crammed with Lenin buttons, dusty memos from the McCarthy period, and crumbling pages of internal briefings dating back a century, the 2,000 cardboard boxes handed over to New York University last month hold secrets about the Communist Party USA that make archivist Peter Filardo's heart flutter. Decades ago, they would have been gold mines for the FBI. "Oh yeah, this is it," Filardo said, sifting through one box. "National convention material from 1919 - this is the founding convention of the Communist Party.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1995
Locked in the fireproof vaults of the 19th Century Shop are some of the world's most valuable manuscripts: Saint Thomas More's "Utopia" printed in 1516, Ernest Hemingway's first book of short stories, and a copy of the Bill of Rights that just sold for $350,000.And if you're really into authors, you can get a piece of Edgar Allan Poe's mahogany coffin, paired as a set with an 1845 business receipt signed by the master of macabre himself. Asking price: $20,000."For those who really appreciate the genius of Poe, even something distantly related to the great man is interesting," says shop owner Stephan Loewentheil, who travels throughout North America looking for rarities and entertains buyers from as far away as Japan.
NEWS
By Erika Hayasaki and Erika Hayasaki,Los Angeles Times | April 22, 2007
NEW YORK -- Crammed with Lenin buttons, dusty memos from the McCarthy period, and crumbling pages of internal briefings dating back a century, the 2,000 cardboard boxes handed over to New York University last month hold secrets about the Communist Party USA that make archivist Peter Filardo's heart flutter. Decades ago, they would have been gold mines for the FBI. "Oh yeah, this is it," Filardo said, sifting through one box. "National convention material from 1919 - this is the founding convention of the Communist Party.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 21, 2003
Madame Bovary, C'est Moi: The Great Characters of Literature and Where They Came From, by Andre Bernard. Norton. 128 pages. $19.95. "If Godot were God," Samuel Beckett famously and defiantly declared, "I would have called him that." And Beckett thus left the puzzle forever unexplained. Andre Bernard, the trade publisher at Harcourt and a columnist for The American Scholar, has put together a bouquet of literary anecdotes and confections that concentrates on the origins of illustrious names in novels -- but goes delightfully further, including lists, quotes and quips ("I cannot tear myself away from living creatures to bother about imaginary ones."
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - First, an interior door starts to shake, rattling a loose key in the lock. Then the walls throb as the concussion of U.S. bombs rumbles like a wave washing over the city. The terrifying sound sends a 14-year-old girl into her mother's arms. The teen-ager holds her ears like a toddler. The scene, during an airstrike yesterday afternoon, has become routine for the Al-Ali family and in thousands of other homes around the city. Most of the bombing appears to be done with precision.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 11, 1999
MOSCOW -- Leo Tolstoy told the story best, 130 years ago. "It was a time of war in the Caucasus," he wrote. "The roads were not safe by night or day. If ever a Russian ventured to ride or walk any distance away from his fort, the Tartars killed him or carried him off to the hills. So it had been arranged that twice every week a body of soldiers should march from one fortress to the next to convoy travelers from point to point." The Russian writer called his short story "A Prisoner in the Caucasus" and told of two Russian officers seized as they rode home through the treacherous mountains.
FEATURES
By The Literary Almanac | July 26, 1998
Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910)was born in Yasnaya Polyana, Russia, into an aristocratic family. Orphaned at 9, he was brought up by an elderly aunt and studied at Kazan University, but did not graduate. After several aimless years in town and countryside, Tolstoy served as an officer in the Caucasus, wrote his first novels, and after the Crimean War retired as commander. He returned to St. Petersburg a literary star, traveled abroad and married Sophie Behrs in 1862. They had 13 children. He is best remembered for some of the most important fiction ever written - "War and Peace" (1869)
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 9, 1996
YASNAYA POLYANA, Russia -- Deep in the Russian countryside, among the birch trees and pine forests that unfailingly stir the Russian soul, a resonant voice is being heard once more.It is a voice that speaks of love and nonviolence, one that celebrates the simple life and the moral purity that comes with living close to nature. It is the voice of one of the world's greatest writers, Leo Tolstoy.Tolstoy was born here, at his family's estate, in 1828 and wrote his greatest works, "War and Peace" and "Anna Karenina," here.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 11, 1999
MOSCOW -- Leo Tolstoy told the story best, 130 years ago. "It was a time of war in the Caucasus," he wrote. "The roads were not safe by night or day. If ever a Russian ventured to ride or walk any distance away from his fort, the Tartars killed him or carried him off to the hills. So it had been arranged that twice every week a body of soldiers should march from one fortress to the next to convoy travelers from point to point." The Russian writer called his short story "A Prisoner in the Caucasus" and told of two Russian officers seized as they rode home through the treacherous mountains.
FEATURES
May 3, 1997
"Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina," reviewed in yesterday's Sun, will not be opening in Baltimore. Warner Bros., the film's distributor, made the last-minute decision after evaluating its disappointing box-office performance in other cities.The film is still playing in Washington at the Cineplex Odeon Outer Circle, 4849 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Call 202-244-3116 or 202-244-3117.Pub Date: 5/03/97
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1995
Locked in the fireproof vaults of the 19th Century Shop are some of the world's most valuable manuscripts: Saint Thomas More's "Utopia" printed in 1516, Ernest Hemingway's first book of short stories, and a copy of the Bill of Rights that just sold for $350,000.And if you're really into authors, you can get a piece of Edgar Allan Poe's mahogany coffin, paired as a set with an 1845 business receipt signed by the master of macabre himself. Asking price: $20,000."For those who really appreciate the genius of Poe, even something distantly related to the great man is interesting," says shop owner Stephan Loewentheil, who travels throughout North America looking for rarities and entertains buyers from as far away as Japan.
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