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Leo Bretholz

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NEWS
March 17, 2014
Leo Bretholz was easily one of the finest human beings of our time ( "Leo Bretholz, Holocaust survivor, dies," March 10). Having lived to be 93, God had certainly granted Leo the gift of years. However, he had accomplished - and was continuing to accomplish - so much that benefited so many that one tended to think he would live forever. He will be mourned by his family first and foremost, by his friends, his neighbors, his fellow Holocaust survivors and the hundreds of people with whom he shared his story in person and in his thrilling book, "Leap into Darkness.
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NEWS
March 22, 2014
After reading Leo Bretholz's commentary on the French railroad company SNCF learning that had written about his ordeal running from the Nazis, I recently bought his book ( "No reparations, no business," March 1). While browsing through the book I noticed that Mr. Bretholz has done many appearances talking about his wartime experiences, so I decided to find out if he had any upcoming talks nearby so I could hear him in person. That's when I found out that Mr. Bretholz had passed recently away.
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NEWS
March 22, 2014
After reading Leo Bretholz's commentary on the French railroad company SNCF learning that had written about his ordeal running from the Nazis, I recently bought his book ( "No reparations, no business," March 1). While browsing through the book I noticed that Mr. Bretholz has done many appearances talking about his wartime experiences, so I decided to find out if he had any upcoming talks nearby so I could hear him in person. That's when I found out that Mr. Bretholz had passed recently away.
NEWS
March 17, 2014
Leo Bretholz was easily one of the finest human beings of our time ( "Leo Bretholz, Holocaust survivor, dies," March 10). Having lived to be 93, God had certainly granted Leo the gift of years. However, he had accomplished - and was continuing to accomplish - so much that benefited so many that one tended to think he would live forever. He will be mourned by his family first and foremost, by his friends, his neighbors, his fellow Holocaust survivors and the hundreds of people with whom he shared his story in person and in his thrilling book, "Leap into Darkness.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who became a major voice in the campaign to gain reparations from companies that transported victims to concentration camps during World War II, died Saturday in his sleep of unknown causes at his Pikesville home. He was 93. Mr. Bretholz was scheduled to testify Monday in the Maryland House of Delegates on a bill that would require the French railroad company SNCF, which is seeking a $6 billion contract from the state of Maryland to operate the Purple Line, to pay reparations to U.S. Holocaust survivors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2010
Shanlei Cardwell could not fathom why so many people had wanted to kill the engaging old man standing before her. Meredith O'Connell laughed at his jokes and wondered how he had the spirit to tell them after all he'd endured. Both teenagers sensed that they'd be talking about Leo Bretholz for decades to come, that they would take on a small part of the quest that has driven him for almost 50 years. For all that time, Bretholz has crisscrossed the Baltimore area telling his harrowing tale of eluding capture and death as an Austrian Jew living in Europe through the Holocaust.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
As policymakers, it is important we acknowledge our limited ability to force actors to behave how we want. What we can do and often attempt is to hold those bad actors accountable when they break the law or act immorally. That is what Leo Bretholz's commentary, "No reparations, no business" (March 1), and House Bill 1326/Senate Bill 754 are all about. Over 70 years ago, the French company SNCF engaged in atrocious behavior, deporting Jews and other minorities to their certain deaths at the hands of their Nazi captors.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
The specter of the Holocaust came to Annapolis on Monday as survivors and their descendants sought what they view as justice in memory of a witness who couldn't be there. Leo Bretholz of Pikesville had been scheduled to testify on behalf of a bill to prohibit an American subsidiary of the French national railway from building a light rail line in the Washington suburbs unless it pays reparations for its role in transporting Nazi victims to European death camps. Bretholz, who escaped from a cattle car carrying Jews and other Nazi victims to Auschwitz in 1942, died in his sleep Saturday, a few days after his 93rd birthday.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | November 8, 1998
SIXTY YEARS AGO this week, as the fires of Kristallnacht scorched the skies over Germany, Leo Bretholz was a 17-year-old boy packed with six other desperate people into a rickety Peugeot racing across Europe to escape the destiny awaiting millions of Jews.It was the overture to a miraculous seven-year journey for Bretholz, which started only days earlier, in Vienna, when his mother insisted that he run for his life. Roundups had long since begun. The rule of the mob had commenced.Leaving behind his mother and his two young sisters, none of whom could have made such an escape, and none of whom would survive the war, Bretholz had already swum a torrential River Sauer, fully clothed on a chilled autumn night, and made his way into Luxembourg, where he was arrested but found haven and a second chance at escape with an underground organization known as the Ezra Committee.
NEWS
July 13, 2005
On Sunday, July 10, 2005, ARCHIE COHEN. Beloved husband of the late Jeanette Cohen (nee Echison); loving father of Ann Harris and Florine Bretholz, both of Baltimore; devoted father-in-law of Leo Bretholz and Dr. Daniel Harris; beloved brother of the late Jack, Frank and Samuel Cohen and Bessie Siegel; loving grandfather of six and loving great-grandfather of 12. Also survived by nieces and nephews. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Wednesday, July 13 at 12 noon.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who became a major voice in the campaign to gain reparations from companies that transported victims to concentration camps during World War II, died Saturday in his sleep of unknown causes at his Pikesville home. He was 93. Mr. Bretholz was scheduled to testify Monday in the Maryland House of Delegates on a bill that would require the French railroad company SNCF, which is seeking a $6 billion contract from the state of Maryland to operate the Purple Line, to pay reparations to U.S. Holocaust survivors.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
The specter of the Holocaust came to Annapolis on Monday as survivors and their descendants sought what they view as justice in memory of a witness who couldn't be there. Leo Bretholz of Pikesville had been scheduled to testify on behalf of a bill to prohibit an American subsidiary of the French national railway from building a light rail line in the Washington suburbs unless it pays reparations for its role in transporting Nazi victims to European death camps. Bretholz, who escaped from a cattle car carrying Jews and other Nazi victims to Auschwitz in 1942, died in his sleep Saturday, a few days after his 93rd birthday.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
As policymakers, it is important we acknowledge our limited ability to force actors to behave how we want. What we can do and often attempt is to hold those bad actors accountable when they break the law or act immorally. That is what Leo Bretholz's commentary, "No reparations, no business" (March 1), and House Bill 1326/Senate Bill 754 are all about. Over 70 years ago, the French company SNCF engaged in atrocious behavior, deporting Jews and other minorities to their certain deaths at the hands of their Nazi captors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2010
Shanlei Cardwell could not fathom why so many people had wanted to kill the engaging old man standing before her. Meredith O'Connell laughed at his jokes and wondered how he had the spirit to tell them after all he'd endured. Both teenagers sensed that they'd be talking about Leo Bretholz for decades to come, that they would take on a small part of the quest that has driven him for almost 50 years. For all that time, Bretholz has crisscrossed the Baltimore area telling his harrowing tale of eluding capture and death as an Austrian Jew living in Europe through the Holocaust.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | November 8, 1998
SIXTY YEARS AGO this week, as the fires of Kristallnacht scorched the skies over Germany, Leo Bretholz was a 17-year-old boy packed with six other desperate people into a rickety Peugeot racing across Europe to escape the destiny awaiting millions of Jews.It was the overture to a miraculous seven-year journey for Bretholz, which started only days earlier, in Vienna, when his mother insisted that he run for his life. Roundups had long since begun. The rule of the mob had commenced.Leaving behind his mother and his two young sisters, none of whom could have made such an escape, and none of whom would survive the war, Bretholz had already swum a torrential River Sauer, fully clothed on a chilled autumn night, and made his way into Luxembourg, where he was arrested but found haven and a second chance at escape with an underground organization known as the Ezra Committee.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 22, 1993
In Michael Olesker's column last Thursday on Leo Bretholz, i was stated incorrectly that Mr. Bretholz was arrested at the Swiss border by a German guard. In fact, it was a Swiss border guard who made the arrest and turned over Mr. Bretholz, then on the run from the Nazis, to the German guard.The Sun regrets the errors.He still sees the old woman on crutches inside his head. She will never go away. She is standing there in the cattle car, in the final hours of her existence, and she is pointing one crutch at Leo Bretholz like a weapon.
NEWS
April 26, 2002
Galilee Lutheran welcomes visitors for Day of Prayer Galilee Lutheran Church in Pasadena will open its doors from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday for this year's National Day of Prayer, which has taken "America United Under God" as its theme. The church welcomes all those interested in sending up a prayer, whether from the rail or the pew. Prayer guides will be available for those who need assistance. Galilee Lutheran Church is at 4652 Mountain Road. Information: 410-255-8236. Calendar Holocaust survivor: St. Andrew the Fisherman Episcopal Church will hold a Yom HaShoah, or commemoration of the Holocaust, at 2 p.m. May 5 at the church, 1183 Carr's Wharf Road, Edgewater.
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