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By Gail Forman | March 3, 1991
The Bible labels Esau a dullard for selling his birthright to his crafty brother, Jacob, for a mess of red pottage. But Jacob must have been a good cook and Esau must have considered the practical advantages of good nutrition and regular meals more important than the theoretical benefits of being the older son. So Jacob became the father of nations while Esau got some bread, something to drink and his pottage of lentils. Fair trade, if you ask a lentil lover like me.Lentils have long been a staple food in the Middle East -- where this member of the legume family is believed to have originated at least 8,000 years ago -- and other parts of the world.
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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
The sudden closing, a few weeks ago, of Mango Grove in Columbia, Md., made more than one person exclaim, "Now, where will I get my dhosa?!" You can get six versions of the stuffed rice-and-lentil crepe at the Carlyle Club in Roland Park. I had forgotten. The Carlyle Club is easy to forget. Even the Carlyle Club says so. Here's the charming text from the restaurant's website: "Drowsing beside the lobby of the hulking Carlyle apartments, the Carlyle Club is one of those under-the-radar restaurants embedded in North Baltimore's older residential buildings.
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By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,Special to The Sun | January 17, 1995
If you're looking for a hearty but low-fat lunch, try lentils. They're a modern miracle health food as old as the hills.Probably the first cultivated legume, lentils have been grown for food since 7000 B.C., according to Harold McGee in "On Food and Cooking."Lentils are the most digestable of all the legumes, and the easiest to prepare. Unlike most beans, lentils don't have to be soaked, and can be cooked, from scratch, in 15 to 20 minutes.Health benefits abound. Just one cup of cooked lentils provides 232 calories, 18 grams of protein, 40 grams of carbohydrate, and only a trace of fat and sodium.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2009
The first incarnation of Kader Camara's Cafe Mocha was a small shop on Howard Street's Antique Row. There, customers had the joy of discovery. Maybe they would come in for an investigatory cup of cappuccino and a pastry and leave with some of Camara's healthful cafe fare. Before long, Camara's food, especially his sandwiches, many of them sprinkled with North African or Caribbean influences, developed a good reputation. Last fall, Camara, a native of Guinea, moved Cafe Mocha into the renovated Railway Express building.
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By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | October 31, 2007
Sausage and rapini (also known as broccoli raab) are a popular combination over pasta, especially the classic orecchiette dish of southern Italy, but they taste great with the earthy flavor of lentils as well. A little blue cheese at the end provides some creaminess. This dish could be adapted to use other greens instead, such as spinach, chard or kale; just remember to adjust the cooking time. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Lentils With Sausage and Rapini Serves 4 -- Total time: 37 minutes 2 cups water 1 cup green lentils, rinsed, drained 3/4 teaspoon salt (divided use)
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By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS and ROBIN MATHER JENKINS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 26, 2006
Beans of any type suit me fine. Lentils may top my list of favorite pulses, though, because they don't need to soak before cooking and they cook so fast. It's easy to make a main dish with lentils and have dinner from scratch on the table in less than an hour. This dish draws on the Arabic traditional dish called mujadrah (moo-JAH-dra), especially beloved in Lebanon and Egypt. For centuries, it has nourished the poor because it provides plenty of complete protein, without meat. Mujadrah also has pleased the rich, because it just tastes so good.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 7, 2004
Lentils are a great cupboard staple that don't get enough attention. As easily prepared as pasta, but more healthful, they can expand your midweek culinary repertoire. (They're usually sold in bags, and are located in the market near the beans.) We like to use chicken-apple sausages that are sold already cooked, such as the Sausages by Amy brand, because they speed preparation. The slightly sweet taste of the sausage is complemented by the orange zest in the lentils. As long as you've got the grill going, slice up some bell peppers and throw them on, too. Finish them with a little olive oil, salt and pepper.
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By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,Orange County Register | April 5, 1995
Want to start an instant culinary debate? Just mention lentils to chefs of different ethnic backgrounds. Lentils, nutritious and inexpensive little disk-shaped legumes with a somewhat neutral taste, are the basis of a vast array of international dishes. From Turkey to India, France to California -- lentils have top billing in soups, salads, loaves, patties and pilafs. The possibilities seem endless.Lentilmania is nothing new. In fact, many food historians trace its culinary roots back 8,000 years to the Middle East.
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By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | January 30, 1991
Take a look at this low-fat magic! One pound of meat stretches to satisfy eight hungry diners when you mix it with hearty lentils and lots of vegetables. Because lentils contain almost no fat, they keep the fat content of the stew at a low seven grams per serving while providing lots of protein, B vitamins and iron. This recipe makes plenty, so you may want to freeze half for another time.Beef Stew with Lentils1 pound boneless beef chuck steak, trimmed of fatNon-stick spray coating7 cups beef broth1 cup chopped onion1 cup sliced celery1 cup sliced carrot1 1/2 cups lentils, rinsed and drained1 14 1/2 -ounce can stewed tomatoes1 bay leaf1 9-ounce package frozen Italian-style green beansCut meat into one-half-inch pieces.
NEWS
By Adrienne Saunders and Adrienne Saunders,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2003
Quick and simple food doesn't have to mean McDonald's or Papa John's. Susie Quick gives the time-crunched cook a healthful and flavorful alternative in Quick Simple Food (Clarkson Potter/Publishers, 2003, $32.50). Nutrition meets modern life in this compilation of creative dishes. Many of the recipes have an Asian bent, such as the miso soup with udon, shiitakes and bok choy, or are a souped-up version of an American staple, such as mac and cheese with sage crumbs. Brisk fall air will tempt you to try each of the inviting soups and stews, such as the butternut-squash-and-apple soup seasoned with cider and mace.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | October 31, 2007
Sausage and rapini (also known as broccoli raab) are a popular combination over pasta, especially the classic orecchiette dish of southern Italy, but they taste great with the earthy flavor of lentils as well. A little blue cheese at the end provides some creaminess. This dish could be adapted to use other greens instead, such as spinach, chard or kale; just remember to adjust the cooking time. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Lentils With Sausage and Rapini Serves 4 -- Total time: 37 minutes 2 cups water 1 cup green lentils, rinsed, drained 3/4 teaspoon salt (divided use)
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | February 28, 2007
A Lenten favorite, lentils long have been served as a low-fat meat substitute. The lens-shaped legume dates to biblical times. A plant source of protein that cooks quickly, lentils remain an important food staple in many cultures around the world. Want even more bang for your buck? Lentils also contain iron, calcium, magnesium, heart-healthy soluble fiber, phytochemicals and folate, a B vitamin that helps the body manufacture blood cells. Many foods, such as rice, cereals and breads, are fortified with folic acid, but this French Lentil Soup is naturally high in folate.
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | December 16, 2006
I don't know whether I am coming or going this time of the year. My "to do" list seems to get longer every day. "Finish buying the Christmas presents, mail out the cards, decorate the tree," I write on our calendar, and my gregarious husband adds, "Have a party." I love to entertain during this season, but this December, I seem to have less free time than usual, so I've decided to combine one of my holiday tasks with entertaining by hosting a small "trim the tree and soup supper." My husband is ecstatic because he is not a natural-born tree trimmer.
NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS and ROBIN MATHER JENKINS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 26, 2006
Beans of any type suit me fine. Lentils may top my list of favorite pulses, though, because they don't need to soak before cooking and they cook so fast. It's easy to make a main dish with lentils and have dinner from scratch on the table in less than an hour. This dish draws on the Arabic traditional dish called mujadrah (moo-JAH-dra), especially beloved in Lebanon and Egypt. For centuries, it has nourished the poor because it provides plenty of complete protein, without meat. Mujadrah also has pleased the rich, because it just tastes so good.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 2005
Betty Koss of Amherst, Mass., was looking for a simple recipe for hearty Italian Lentil Minestrone Soup. George DiVito from Springdale, Ark., sent in his favorite recipe for Italian Lentil Soup. It was easy to prepare and, when paired with a nice loaf of bread and a salad, made a wonderful supper on a cold, snowy night. I followed DiVito's suggestion and drizzled the bowls with olive oil and a generous amount of freshly grated parmesan cheese. Recipe requests Isobel Clayton of Santa Rosa, Calif.
NEWS
By Harry Merritt and Harry Merritt,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2004
Death can come at any time, in any place. Whenever, and wherever, it occurs, there's an excellent chance the dead person's loved ones will mark the passing with food. Lots of food. "You can ask any caterer," says Lisa Rogak, author of Death Warmed Over: Funeral Food, Rituals, and Customs From Around the World (Ten Speed Press, $19.95). "Most people eat a lot more food at funerals than at weddings. And that cuts across all cultures." Rogak's book is fascinating and sometimes funny - and packed with lore about funeral traditions, such as the practice in 17th-century Scotland of discarding all of the milk, onions and butter in the home of a dead person.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | March 21, 1999
Stocking your kitchen with grains and dried legumes is a practical investment in good, healthful eating. Properly combined, these inexpensive staples are a low-fat source of complete protein and, along with the fruits and vegetables of each season, contribute vitamins and minerals and other nutrients, as well as fiber, to the diet.Health benefits aside, these simple foods lend themselves to one imaginative combination after another, providing the freshness, variety and appealing taste that make meals enjoyable.
NEWS
By Harry Merritt and Harry Merritt,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2004
Death can come at any time, in any place. Whenever, and wherever, it occurs, there's an excellent chance the dead person's loved ones will mark the passing with food. Lots of food. "You can ask any caterer," says Lisa Rogak, author of Death Warmed Over: Funeral Food, Rituals, and Customs From Around the World (Ten Speed Press, $19.95). "Most people eat a lot more food at funerals than at weddings. And that cuts across all cultures." Rogak's book is fascinating and sometimes funny - and packed with lore about funeral traditions, such as the practice in 17th-century Scotland of discarding all of the milk, onions and butter in the home of a dead person.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 7, 2004
Lentils are a great cupboard staple that don't get enough attention. As easily prepared as pasta, but more healthful, they can expand your midweek culinary repertoire. (They're usually sold in bags, and are located in the market near the beans.) We like to use chicken-apple sausages that are sold already cooked, such as the Sausages by Amy brand, because they speed preparation. The slightly sweet taste of the sausage is complemented by the orange zest in the lentils. As long as you've got the grill going, slice up some bell peppers and throw them on, too. Finish them with a little olive oil, salt and pepper.
NEWS
By Adrienne Saunders and Adrienne Saunders,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2003
Quick and simple food doesn't have to mean McDonald's or Papa John's. Susie Quick gives the time-crunched cook a healthful and flavorful alternative in Quick Simple Food (Clarkson Potter/Publishers, 2003, $32.50). Nutrition meets modern life in this compilation of creative dishes. Many of the recipes have an Asian bent, such as the miso soup with udon, shiitakes and bok choy, or are a souped-up version of an American staple, such as mac and cheese with sage crumbs. Brisk fall air will tempt you to try each of the inviting soups and stews, such as the butternut-squash-and-apple soup seasoned with cider and mace.
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