Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLenny Bruce
IN THE NEWS

Lenny Bruce

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Gerald Harris | October 3, 1990
IF LENNY BRUCE were alive and well he would not want for targets for his scathing satire. The guardians of America's moral fiber are again in the saddle, rounding up social strays and riding hell-bent for salvation.The U.S. attorney general's anti-pornography posses, using multiple prosecutions in carefully selected, ultraconservative jurisdictions, threaten to reduce the literary and artistic diet of American adults to non-offensive pabulum.And the attorney general is not without local volunteers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Book Editor | March 27, 2005
The Bones, by Seth Greenland., Bloomsbury. 393 Pages. $24.95. Here's a novel to unite America, a skewering of Hollywood culture for its excess, its hypocrisy, its self-adoration. Plus, for all of us who stand outside the dream machine, The Bones, by first time novelist Seth Greenland, embraces the satisfying if small-minded moral that fame, success and unimaginable wealth do not necessarily lift the veil of loneliness and self-loathing. In that way, The Bones is quite consoling for us schlubs with noses pressed against the window.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 20, 2002
Once upon a time in the United States of America, when we all believed that the First Amendment was flying high and healthy, it was taboo to utter in public the four-letter onomatopoetic Anglo Saxon term for the conjugal act that today can be heard several times an hour on prime time television. The Oxford English Dictionary records that the word has been in common usage at least since 1503, but less than 40 years ago the rage against "obscenity" drove prosecutors in New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago and other ostensibly sophisticated cities to hound Lenny Bruce -- an obstreperous comedian who defiantly used the word in his night-club acts -- into penury and early death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 17, 2004
Thirty-eight years after telling his last joke, Lenny Bruce is everywhere and nowhere. His influence is heard in virtually every comedy club in the country. Rap, rock, hip-hop, music videos and cable shows seem to celebrate the battles of the legendary comic and provocateur. If only they knew who he was. Bruce's image and knowledge of how he used his comic weapon against intolerance, injustice and conformity - and the heavy price he paid for doing so - have been scraped from the wallpaper of American pop culture since before most of today's envelope-pushers were born.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 17, 2004
Thirty-eight years after telling his last joke, Lenny Bruce is everywhere and nowhere. His influence is heard in virtually every comedy club in the country. Rap, rock, hip-hop, music videos and cable shows seem to celebrate the battles of the legendary comic and provocateur. If only they knew who he was. Bruce's image and knowledge of how he used his comic weapon against intolerance, injustice and conformity - and the heavy price he paid for doing so - have been scraped from the wallpaper of American pop culture since before most of today's envelope-pushers were born.
NEWS
March 31, 1994
* Albert Goldman, 66, the author of biographies of Lenny Bruce, Elvis Presley and John Lennon, died of a heart attack Monday while traveling from Miami to London.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | December 15, 1991
If a notorious radio personality came on the air in Baltimore and virtually no one tuned in to his show, might he still have an impact on the market?It's a question local radio executives have been asking about New York shock jock Howard Stern, whose morning show began being simulcast here Oct. 1 on WJFK-AM (1300 KHz), formerly WLIF-AM and before that WFBR.It's also a question that begets a couple of others -- namely, what kind of radio market is Baltimore? Or to be more precise, is it too conservative for cutting-edge personalities?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Book Editor | March 27, 2005
The Bones, by Seth Greenland., Bloomsbury. 393 Pages. $24.95. Here's a novel to unite America, a skewering of Hollywood culture for its excess, its hypocrisy, its self-adoration. Plus, for all of us who stand outside the dream machine, The Bones, by first time novelist Seth Greenland, embraces the satisfying if small-minded moral that fame, success and unimaginable wealth do not necessarily lift the veil of loneliness and self-loathing. In that way, The Bones is quite consoling for us schlubs with noses pressed against the window.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1997
In an ambitious effort that administrators say will help rejuvenate the Mount Vernon-Belvedere area, the University of Baltimore unveiled a master plan yesterday that calls for the acquisition of a half-dozen vacant or underused properties throughout midtown.As presented to the University System of Maryland board of regents, the plan also calls for several major additions designed to help the university increase enrollment by up to 1,000 students over the next decade, including a student union, housing, parking and a library expansion.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 29, 1990
So what is it about Jewish humor that makes it so funny? Explain to me please why everybody is laughing so hard, even the Gentiles who don't know what the guy is talking about?Such questions are addressed tomorrow night on PBS in yet another groundbreaking Great Performances, "The World of Jewish Humor" which will be on Maryland Public Television, Channels 22 and 67, at 9 o'clock.So the show can't answer such deep questions during its 90 minutes. So who cares? Everytime it gets stumped, it tells another joke.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 20, 2002
Once upon a time in the United States of America, when we all believed that the First Amendment was flying high and healthy, it was taboo to utter in public the four-letter onomatopoetic Anglo Saxon term for the conjugal act that today can be heard several times an hour on prime time television. The Oxford English Dictionary records that the word has been in common usage at least since 1503, but less than 40 years ago the rage against "obscenity" drove prosecutors in New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago and other ostensibly sophisticated cities to hound Lenny Bruce -- an obstreperous comedian who defiantly used the word in his night-club acts -- into penury and early death.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1997
In an ambitious effort that administrators say will help rejuvenate the Mount Vernon-Belvedere area, the University of Baltimore unveiled a master plan yesterday that calls for the acquisition of a half-dozen vacant or underused properties throughout midtown.As presented to the University System of Maryland board of regents, the plan also calls for several major additions designed to help the university increase enrollment by up to 1,000 students over the next decade, including a student union, housing, parking and a library expansion.
NEWS
March 31, 1994
* Albert Goldman, 66, the author of biographies of Lenny Bruce, Elvis Presley and John Lennon, died of a heart attack Monday while traveling from Miami to London.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | December 15, 1991
If a notorious radio personality came on the air in Baltimore and virtually no one tuned in to his show, might he still have an impact on the market?It's a question local radio executives have been asking about New York shock jock Howard Stern, whose morning show began being simulcast here Oct. 1 on WJFK-AM (1300 KHz), formerly WLIF-AM and before that WFBR.It's also a question that begets a couple of others -- namely, what kind of radio market is Baltimore? Or to be more precise, is it too conservative for cutting-edge personalities?
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 29, 1990
So what is it about Jewish humor that makes it so funny? Explain to me please why everybody is laughing so hard, even the Gentiles who don't know what the guy is talking about?Such questions are addressed tomorrow night on PBS in yet another groundbreaking Great Performances, "The World of Jewish Humor" which will be on Maryland Public Television, Channels 22 and 67, at 9 o'clock.So the show can't answer such deep questions during its 90 minutes. So who cares? Everytime it gets stumped, it tells another joke.
NEWS
By Gerald Harris | October 3, 1990
IF LENNY BRUCE were alive and well he would not want for targets for his scathing satire. The guardians of America's moral fiber are again in the saddle, rounding up social strays and riding hell-bent for salvation.The U.S. attorney general's anti-pornography posses, using multiple prosecutions in carefully selected, ultraconservative jurisdictions, threaten to reduce the literary and artistic diet of American adults to non-offensive pabulum.And the attorney general is not without local volunteers.
NEWS
June 20, 2004
Jackie Paris, 79, a jazz vocalist who toured with Charlie Parker and was said to be one of the favorite singers of Ella Fitzgerald and comedian Lenny Bruce, died Thursday in Manhattan of complications of bone cancer. He worked with Lionel Hampton and Charles Mingus and was the first to sing the lyrics to Thelonious Monk's "'Round Midnight." Later, he taught master classes and gave private lessons while continuing to record and perform.
NEWS
December 23, 1997
Peter A. Leventritt,82, who won 13 national bridge titles and was considered one of the greatest players in the country, died in New York on Dec. 6 of complications from diabetes.Sally Marr,91, the mother of comedian Lenny Bruce and a comedian and talent agent credited with discovering Cheech & Chong, Sam Kinison and Pat Morita, died Dec. 14 in Los Angeles.George Tsutakawa,87, a prolific artist known for serene fountains and abstract bronze structures, died Thursday in Seattle.Dr. Irving S. Wright,96, the first physician to use an anti-coagulant to treat blood clots that can cause heart attacks and strokes, died Dec. 8 in New York.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.