Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLen Bias
IN THE NEWS

Len Bias

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Rick Maese | November 20, 2005
Cole Field House is dimly lit, just a single row of lights burning high above the floor. a few people walk around the concourse, but it's mostly quiet.There are no banners hanging from the rafters, and there are no basketball hoops down below. But you can still feel something. Red wooden seats circle the arena and even though the Maryland Terrapins moved out three years ago, the sense of history hits you like a rush of air when you open the doors. You take a seat and travel back 20 years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | October 3, 2014
COLLEGE PARK -- For each inductee he introduced Friday night, emcee Chick Hernandez ran through a list of that person's accomplishments at the University of Maryland. For most who were announced, the 400 people gathered at tables in the Heise Room at the Samuel Riggs Alumni Center would give a standard applause as the inductee was led from the back corner of the room to the front and eventually to their seat. But when Hernandez introduced Len Bias, the 400 rose from their seats and clapped for an extended period as members of Bias' family - his parents and two of his siblings - was led to the front of the room.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
If Len Bias could attend his own Hall of Fame ceremony on Friday , he'd do so as a 50-year-old man. That's a heck of a thing to wrap your head around if, like me, you grew up as an obsessed ACC basketball fan in the 1980s. Lenny has lived as an idea about what could have been for so long, it's strange to think of him as an actual person. Every generation has its touchstones. For my parents, it was the Kennedy assassination. People my age remember watching from their elementary school classrooms as the Challenger exploded and later on, 9/11.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
If Len Bias could attend his own Hall of Fame ceremony on Friday , he'd do so as a 50-year-old man. That's a heck of a thing to wrap your head around if, like me, you grew up as an obsessed ACC basketball fan in the 1980s. Lenny has lived as an idea about what could have been for so long, it's strange to think of him as an actual person. Every generation has its touchstones. For my parents, it was the Kennedy assassination. People my age remember watching from their elementary school classrooms as the Challenger exploded and later on, 9/11.
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | October 3, 2014
COLLEGE PARK -- For each inductee he introduced Friday night, emcee Chick Hernandez ran through a list of that person's accomplishments at the University of Maryland. For most who were announced, the 400 people gathered at tables in the Heise Room at the Samuel Riggs Alumni Center would give a standard applause as the inductee was led from the back corner of the room to the front and eventually to their seat. But when Hernandez introduced Len Bias, the 400 rose from their seats and clapped for an extended period as members of Bias' family - his parents and two of his siblings - was led to the front of the room.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Since a memorial service at a sweltering, standing-room only Cole Field House was held a few days after Len Bias' death in June 1986, there has been little official connection between the former basketball All-American and the University of Maryland. But nearly three decades after his fatal cocaine overdose, and the fallout that led to significant changes at the school, Bias will formally be recognized by Maryland when he is inducted posthumously into the Terps' athletics Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2011
In 2009, former Maryland basketball coach Lefty Driesell received a puzzling phone call. C.J. Leslie — a high school player recruited by Kentucky, Connecticut and other powerhouse programs — introduced himself and said he wanted to learn all he could about Len Bias, the Driesell-coached basketball prodigy Driesell paused for a moment. "I thought, 'Wait, this kid wasn't even born when Leonard passed away.' But Leonard was his favorite player. He had copied his game after Leonard's.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 20, 1996
From all points in this big, eternally haunted Cole Fieldhouse, you can gaze down to the basketball court and picture the ghost of Len Bias with a ball in his massive hands, defying the various laws of gravity, looking like a Michael Jordan with muscles in the making.But you have to look pretty hard. Ten years after his death from a mixture of cocaine and stupidity, instead of inscribing his name across the athletic skies, Bias has become our national cautionary tale.Instead of remembering him driving to the hoop, we recall a bleak funeral procession driving Bias to his grave.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff The following contributed to this story: Patrick Ercolano, Josie Karp, Elisha King, Melody Simmons, Marina Sarris and Norris West | June 19, 1991
Lonise Bias arrives alone for the anti-drug luncheon, a tall, strong, self-possessed woman, striking in a blue linen suit as she crosses the flagstones of the Hyatt Regency atrium.You can see her son, Lenny, in her youthful stride, her athletic carriage, in the bones of her face, and then in the wide sweep of her arms as she makes her impassioned plea against the drugs that killed her son.And for a moment you can almost see the long reach of his fine, young body stretching once again for the basket in overtime against North Carolina at the Cole Field House.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2006
The telephone message emanating these days from the offices of the Boston Celtics identifies the franchise as having won 16 NBA championships. What it doesn't mention is this: It has been 20 years since the last one. On June 8, 1986, the Celtics closed out the Houston Rockets in Game 6 of the NBA Finals. A little more than a week later, the Celtics selected Maryland star Len Bias with the No. 2 overall pick in the draft. On the morning of June 19, less than 48 hours after he put on a Celtics cap and was introduced by NBA commissioner David Stern, Bias was dead of cocaine intoxication.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Since a memorial service at a sweltering, standing-room only Cole Field House was held a few days after Len Bias' death in June 1986, there has been little official connection between the former basketball All-American and the University of Maryland. But nearly three decades after his fatal cocaine overdose, and the fallout that led to significant changes at the school, Bias will formally be recognized by Maryland when he is inducted posthumously into the Terps' athletics Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
Trevor Hass and The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
Maryland baseball coach John Szefc paused and looked forward, trying to articulate just how special it was to be part of the Terps ' first NCAA tournament team in 43 years. Szefc was just 4 years old when Maryland lost its first two games in Gastonia, N.C., in the 1971 national tourney. "It's kind of hard for me to wrap my mind around that," Szefc said. Since then, the program has endured 27 losing seasons in 43 years, failing to compete with perennial Atlantic Coast Conference powerhouses such as North Carolina State, Georgia Tech, Virginia and Florida State.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun and By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Welcome to a second season of Morning Shootaround. We will follow the Terps throughout the 2013-14 season, but this year in this space we will provide a look ahead rather than looking back. We will try to analyze Maryland's strengths and weaknesses, as well as those of its upcoming opponent. We also hope to provide quotes and anecdotes from practices to give some idea of what coach Mark Turgeon and his team are doing. Here are a few things to watch as the Terps get ready to play Florida State in the second round of the ACC tournament in Greensboro, N.C., on Thursday at noon.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | April 18, 2013
Men's college basketball Len earns Bias Award as most valuable Terp Alex Len was given the Len Bias Award as Maryland's most valuable player at the team's awards banquet. Len also earned the Len Elmore Award for most rebounds and the Buck Williams Award for most valuable defensive player. Dez Wells received the Greivis Vasquez Award for most inspirational player. Other winners were: Jake Layman , Juan Dixon Award for most improved player; Shaquille Cleare , Walt Williams Coaches Award for most coachable player; Pe'Shon Howard , Steve Blake Award for assists; and Logan Aronhalt , Tom McMillen Award for academic achievement.
SPORTS
February 1, 2013
Baltimore Sun reporters Jeff Barker and Don Markus and editor Matt Bracken weigh in on the three biggest topics of the past week in Maryland sports. Is Dez Wells Maryland's next great player? Don Markus: A generation of Maryland basketball has produced only a handful of truly great college players. Len Bias and Juan Dixon remain at the top of the list, with Joe Smith, Walt Williams, Lonny Baxter and Greivis Vasquez rounding out a very select group. Johnny Rhodes, Keith Booth and Steve Blake are certainly in the discussion.
NEWS
June 20, 2011
June 19th marked the 25th anniversary of the cocaine related death of University of Maryland basketball star Len Bias. It was a tragedy that sent shock waves throughout the sports world and the entire country. It turns out it was only the beginning of an epidemic that has grown to impact every sport in this country. Both legal and illegal drug use in sports remains in the spotlight and continues to embarrass, harm and even kill our athletes well before their time. Just in the past several weeks we have seen drugs impact no fewer than six different sports and may have taken the lives of several athletes.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2006
The death of former Maryland star Len Bias was not the only drug-related tragedy to taint the 1986 NBA draft. Chris Washburn, William Bedford and Roy Tarpley - the third, sixth and seventh picks, respectively - all saw their careers cut short by drug problems. "It was a really good draft and guys found a way to screw it up," said college basketball analyst Jay Bilas, who had just finished his own college career at Duke and was a second-round draft choice that year. Yet that troubled group might have had an impact in the way NBA general managers and scouts looked into the backgrounds and social habits of the players they were interested in drafting.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.