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By THE BALTIMORE ZOO | January 9, 2002
The lemur is a primate, which means it is related to apes and humans. Most lemurs have long, pointy noses, which contribute to their excellent sense of smell. Lemurs use their sense of smell to communicate with each other. Lemurs have big, bushy tails that they wave in the air as another form of communication. what's for DINNER? Lemurs eat leaves, fruit and insects. do you KNOW? Where are all lemurs found? Answer: All lemurs are found only in Madagascar, an island off the coast of Africa.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
A new species of lemur has arrived at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , adding to a multi-species collection that has also grown in other ways recently. Alexander and Fern, the two new ring-tailed lemurs, are the first of their kind at the zoo, which also welcomed a newborn Coquerel's sifaka lemur in March named Max. Max's siblings Otto and Nero were born at the zoo in recent years. Alexander, 8, and Fern, 6, recently arrived in Baltimore from the Duke Lemur Center in Durham, North Carolina, zoo officials said.
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HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
When researcher Erik Patel hiked into the mountainous rain forest of northeast Madagascar in 2001, he was a doctoral student embarking on a quest for basic scientific knowledge about one of the rarest primates in the world: a snow-white lemur called the silky sifaka. More than a decade later, Patel, who was profiled by The Baltimore Sun in 2006, remains dedicated to the acrobatic animals he affectionately calls silkies. Only today much of his work is devoted to preserving the species from an array of powerful forces, such as poaching and destruction of habitat.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
An endangered lemur species native only to the island of Madagascar has grown its global population by one with the birth last month of Maximilian - the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore 's newest Coquerel's sifaka. The species (pronounced CAHK-ker-rells she-FAHK) produce babies that resemble "tiny gremlins" before their white hair begins to grow in, the zoo said. Images of "Max," as he's known, show his hair has come in - he was born March 30, though his birth was announced Wednesday - and he can now be seen on some days with his parents inside the zoo's sifaka exhibit at the Chimpanzee Forest, zoo officials said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
A new species of lemur has arrived at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , adding to a multi-species collection that has also grown in other ways recently. Alexander and Fern, the two new ring-tailed lemurs, are the first of their kind at the zoo, which also welcomed a newborn Coquerel's sifaka lemur in March named Max. Max's siblings Otto and Nero were born at the zoo in recent years. Alexander, 8, and Fern, 6, recently arrived in Baltimore from the Duke Lemur Center in Durham, North Carolina, zoo officials said.
FEATURES
February 2, 1999
Be a 4Kids DetectiveWhen you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/1. How many types of lemurs liveon Madagascar?2. What does the cochlea inthe inner ear convert?Visit A Living EdenThe twigs crackle under your feet as you push your way through the dense foliage of the jungle. As you come into a clearing, you see an amazing, endangered creature. Don't miss your chance-take a picture fast! This is just the beginning of your Madagascar adventure. At http://www.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 31, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- Many of the melancholy bouquets delivered to the Philadelphia Zoo last week are adorned with little bananas and apples, symbolic gifts to the 23 gorillas and gibbons, lemurs and orangutans that died Christmas Eve in the country's worst calamity for zoo animals.Not quite human, the simian families that perished from a smoky fire have left behind not only an aching grief but also potentially irreparable holes in the gene pool for the country's primate population."I cannot think of anything comparable to this loss in North America," said Kevin Willis, a conservation biologist at the American Zoo and Aquarium Association.
NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | January 1, 2006
MAROJEJY NATIONAL PARK, Madagascar -- It used to be that even the most dedicated animal researchers were not supposed to worry much about preserving the species they studied. "People told me when I started working in Madagascar that if I got interested in conservation, I might never get tenure, that this was not science," Patricia Wright, director of the Institute for the Conservation of Tropical Environments at the State University of New York, Stony Brook, recalls of her experience of 20 years ago. Now, "I teach my students you can do really good research and apply it to conservation goals, and it's not a sin."
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2011
Cue the oohs and ahhs. Otto is ready for his debut. The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore unveiled its newest addition — a male Coquerel's sifaka — to the public Wednesday. "People should be very proud to come to their zoo and see these," said Meredith Wagoner, the zoo's mammal collection and conservation manager. "It is very rare that they will be able to … see these. " The addition of Otto is a "highly significant birth for the sifaka population in North America," according to Mike McClure, general curator for the zoo. Coquerel's sifaka are lemurs and native to Madagascar, an island off the eastern coast of Africa.
NEWS
By Steve Courtney and Steve Courtney,Hartford Courant | March 17, 1991
LAST CHANCE TO SEE.Douglas Adamsand Mark Carwardine.Harmony Books.220 pages. $20.Pairing British humorist Douglas Adams -- best known for thmind-bogglingly funny science fiction of "The Hitchhiker's Guide the Galaxy" and its many novelistic offspring -- with the serious issue of dying species may seem an odd idea.It turns out that, like the "Hitchhiker's Guide," this was the British Broadcasting Co.'s odd idea, although the BBC got the idea from a magazine article that paired Mr. Adams with zoologist Mark Carwardine of the World Wildlife Fund.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
When researcher Erik Patel hiked into the mountainous rain forest of northeast Madagascar in 2001, he was a doctoral student embarking on a quest for basic scientific knowledge about one of the rarest primates in the world: a snow-white lemur called the silky sifaka. More than a decade later, Patel, who was profiled by The Baltimore Sun in 2006, remains dedicated to the acrobatic animals he affectionately calls silkies. Only today much of his work is devoted to preserving the species from an array of powerful forces, such as poaching and destruction of habitat.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2011
Cue the oohs and ahhs. Otto is ready for his debut. The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore unveiled its newest addition — a male Coquerel's sifaka — to the public Wednesday. "People should be very proud to come to their zoo and see these," said Meredith Wagoner, the zoo's mammal collection and conservation manager. "It is very rare that they will be able to … see these. " The addition of Otto is a "highly significant birth for the sifaka population in North America," according to Mike McClure, general curator for the zoo. Coquerel's sifaka are lemurs and native to Madagascar, an island off the eastern coast of Africa.
NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | January 1, 2006
MAROJEJY NATIONAL PARK, Madagascar -- It used to be that even the most dedicated animal researchers were not supposed to worry much about preserving the species they studied. "People told me when I started working in Madagascar that if I got interested in conservation, I might never get tenure, that this was not science," Patricia Wright, director of the Institute for the Conservation of Tropical Environments at the State University of New York, Stony Brook, recalls of her experience of 20 years ago. Now, "I teach my students you can do really good research and apply it to conservation goals, and it's not a sin."
NEWS
By THE BALTIMORE ZOO | January 9, 2002
The lemur is a primate, which means it is related to apes and humans. Most lemurs have long, pointy noses, which contribute to their excellent sense of smell. Lemurs use their sense of smell to communicate with each other. Lemurs have big, bushy tails that they wave in the air as another form of communication. what's for DINNER? Lemurs eat leaves, fruit and insects. do you KNOW? Where are all lemurs found? Answer: All lemurs are found only in Madagascar, an island off the coast of Africa.
TRAVEL
By Randi Kest | July 11, 1999
ANOTHER GOLDEN ERA FOR ROMEAfter nearly 20 years of renovations, Nero's famous Italian palace, Domus Aurea (which means Golden House), reopened last month. Built between the years 64 A.D. and 68 A.D., the palace was known for its size and opulence and also for its historical significance.When the Flavian dynasty came to power after Nero's suicide in 68 A.D., they started dismantling Domus Aurea in an attempt to erase the emperor and his tyrannical rule from history. The palace remained buried beneath soil until the late 15th century.
FEATURES
February 2, 1999
Be a 4Kids DetectiveWhen you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/1. How many types of lemurs liveon Madagascar?2. What does the cochlea inthe inner ear convert?Visit A Living EdenThe twigs crackle under your feet as you push your way through the dense foliage of the jungle. As you come into a clearing, you see an amazing, endangered creature. Don't miss your chance-take a picture fast! This is just the beginning of your Madagascar adventure. At http://www.
TRAVEL
By Randi Kest | July 11, 1999
ANOTHER GOLDEN ERA FOR ROMEAfter nearly 20 years of renovations, Nero's famous Italian palace, Domus Aurea (which means Golden House), reopened last month. Built between the years 64 A.D. and 68 A.D., the palace was known for its size and opulence and also for its historical significance.When the Flavian dynasty came to power after Nero's suicide in 68 A.D., they started dismantling Domus Aurea in an attempt to erase the emperor and his tyrannical rule from history. The palace remained buried beneath soil until the late 15th century.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 7, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- He's a proven stud, winner of a Best of Cincinnati award for siring five western-lowland gorillas this year alone.And in the words of his current curator, he is in that "punk" stage -- constantly charging the bars, smacking a female on the side as he passes her, saying: "Hey, I'm running this group."Chaka, an 11-year-old, 250-pound gorilla whose saddle is just starting to gray, left Philadelphia two years ago on a breeding loan. His parents were Samantha and John, two of the 23 animals who perished in the Dec. 24 electrical fire at the Philadelphia Zoo's World of Primates.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 7, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- He's a proven stud, winner of a Best of Cincinnati award for siring five western-lowland gorillas this year alone.And in the words of his current curator, he is in that "punk" stage -- constantly charging the bars, smacking a female on the side as he passes her, saying: "Hey, I'm running this group."Chaka, an 11-year-old, 250-pound gorilla whose saddle is just starting to gray, left Philadelphia two years ago on a breeding loan. His parents were Samantha and John, two of the 23 animals who perished in the Dec. 24 electrical fire at the Philadelphia Zoo's World of Primates.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 31, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- Many of the melancholy bouquets delivered to the Philadelphia Zoo last week are adorned with little bananas and apples, symbolic gifts to the 23 gorillas and gibbons, lemurs and orangutans that died Christmas Eve in the country's worst calamity for zoo animals.Not quite human, the simian families that perished from a smoky fire have left behind not only an aching grief but also potentially irreparable holes in the gene pool for the country's primate population."I cannot think of anything comparable to this loss in North America," said Kevin Willis, a conservation biologist at the American Zoo and Aquarium Association.
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