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Lemonade Stand

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NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1999
Dressed in a baggy, bright yellow cotton suit and a green visor dotted with felt leaves, Jermaine Allen bopped up and down Somerset, Eager and Aisquith streets yelling at passing motorists and pedestrians to buy a cup of lemonade.The 9-year-old mobile lemon was learning an important part of a successful business: promotion.Jermaine is one of about 20 children participating in the Caroline Center's summer program, Camp Lemonade Stand. While their mothers complete the center's welfare-to-work training program, the children are learning business basics by running a lemonade stand and doing everything from product selection to advertising.
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July 3, 2012
Local teens Leah Getz and Kara Lynch recently set up a lemonade stand and donated the proceeds to the Havre de Grace library. Surprising library staff with their generous and unexpected gesture, the donation was made during the first week of Harford County Public Library's Summer Reading Program. The proceeds will be used to help support children and teen programming at the Havre de Grace library. Upcoming programs at the Havre de Grace library include visits from special presenters The Bubble Lady on July 14 and The Extreme Balloon Man on July 26. Children grades three and up can "Catch a Dream" by making a dream catcher on July 17 and children of all ages can participate in Stargazing Fun on July 31. Middle and high school teens are invited to get creative with a Black Light T-shirts craft program on July 21. All program information is available at HCPLonline.org.
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FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2004
It's the start of Columbus Day weekend, not as important as Labor Day or Memorial Day in the annals of auto sales, but still a potentially lucrative Saturday. At his morning meeting with sales reps, though, Koons Volvo general manager Todd Ruprecht will tell his guys that today is not about selling cars. It's about raising money for pediatric cancer and fulfilling the dream of a little girl who hoped to raise $1 million by selling lemonade. "If we sell no cars and raise a lot of money," he'll say, "I'll be happy."
NEWS
By Lauren Weiner | July 26, 2011
The authorities are coming down hard on kids' lemonade stands this summer. In Georgia, three girls trying to earn enough for a trip to a water park were told they needed $50 a day in business permits. In Wisconsin, the cops busted a pair of sisters who figured they could make some money selling lemonade to people headed to a nearby car show. (The police eventually backed down.) And right here in Maryland, Montgomery County authorities shut down a stand outside the U.S. Open golf tournament in June.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 20, 2005
Decisions about pricing, product mix and location tumbled through Alex Waggoner's mind as he started his enterprise. His business adviser observed his interactions with potential customers and counseled him about a more aggressive sales approach. Was he a hot-shot Wharton graduate working with a venture capitalist? No, Alex was just 6, setting up a summer lemonade stand in Seattle, and his business adviser was his mother. Now 7 and in his second year as a lemonade salesman, Alex has decided to post signs in his neighborhood, directing people to his stand, "instead of yelling as they go by."
NEWS
August 5, 2004
Alexandra Scott, 8, a cancer patient who started a lemonade stand to raise money for cancer research, sparking a nationwide fund-raising campaign that has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars, died Sunday at her home in Wynnewood, Pa. Alexandra, who received a diagnosis just before her first birthday of neuroblastoma, an aggressive form of childhood cancer, set up a lemonade stand to raise money for treatment. She took in $2,000 its first year. In June, lemonade stand fund-raisers were set up in all 50 states.
NEWS
By Shayna Meliker and Shayna Meliker,Sun reporter | July 11, 2008
It's a Casual Thursday at James Kendig's small business. Donning a maroon T-shirt, jean shorts and some old pins he found at his grandmother's house, James considers himself the manager. He supervises advertising, money-handling and customer service, and he takes his job seriously - even if he does work barefoot. But this isn't an ordinary operation. James is spending part of his summer running a lemonade stand to raise money for the American Cancer Society. And he's only 9 years old. "I was at a restaurant and I was just squeezing lemons into my water," said James, a rising fifth-grader at Stevens Forest Elementary School.
NEWS
By RICK HOROWITZ | August 21, 1994
I own a lemonade stand -- lemonade, 50 cents a glass. It's the best lemonade stand in the neighborhood. It's also the only lemonade stand in the neighborhood -- I think it's better that way, don't you?"
BUSINESS
By Steve Rosen and Steve Rosen,McClatchy-Tribune | August 3, 2008
Lemonade stands are no longer just the driveway domain for youngsters hoping to squeeze out a few dimes or quarters on a hot summer day. Just ask 16-year-old Peter Briggs. Since last fall, the high school junior from Fairfield, Conn., has been peddling products for profit through his own lemonade business. His mother also has a stand. Same with his grandmother, and a few of his teenage friends. Unlike the stand that Briggs ran in his neighborhood as a little boy, his new venture is actually an online outlet featured on his Facebook personal Web page.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and By Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2005
For grillers, burger is king Americans are grilling fruit, vegetables and even cookies, but the latest annual Weber GrillWatch Survey finds the most popular grill food is still hamburgers. The survey released this spring found that 93 percent of the people who have grilled in the past year slapped a burger on the grate. Other popular items are hot dogs, chicken pieces, steaks and pork chops. Almost a third of the respondents said they grilled more last year than the year before. New for brews Tea lovers now can brew their tea on the go with Pacific Cornetta's new Tea-zer.
NEWS
June 17, 2011
Sometimes life lessons are hard to swallow. If the case of Montgomery County shutting down kids selling lemonade for charity, these kids have learned a hard but valuable lesson ("Montgomery County shuts kids' lemonade stand," June 17). That lesson, kids, is if you're going to do business in Montgomery County, you need to make sure that county officials get their cut! Local residents know better. That's why they don't get hassled for gouging golf fans at $50-to-$60 a car for what would normally be illegal parking on their lawns.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | August 12, 2009
Sophia Litrenta is planning to open a lemonade stand Tuesday. The 9-year-old is still working out the details but she thinks she'll charge 50 cents a cup. She wants to raise $200, an ambitious goal that means selling 400 cups in the two hours her stand in Lutherville will be open. None of this is exactly exceptional except that Sophia plans to donate her earnings to the Baltimore Police Department Mounted Unit, which had its funding cut and is now seeking the public's help raising $200,000 to keep officers on horseback for at least another year.
BUSINESS
By Steve Rosen and Steve Rosen,McClatchy-Tribune | August 3, 2008
Lemonade stands are no longer just the driveway domain for youngsters hoping to squeeze out a few dimes or quarters on a hot summer day. Just ask 16-year-old Peter Briggs. Since last fall, the high school junior from Fairfield, Conn., has been peddling products for profit through his own lemonade business. His mother also has a stand. Same with his grandmother, and a few of his teenage friends. Unlike the stand that Briggs ran in his neighborhood as a little boy, his new venture is actually an online outlet featured on his Facebook personal Web page.
NEWS
By Shayna Meliker and Shayna Meliker,Sun reporter | July 11, 2008
It's a Casual Thursday at James Kendig's small business. Donning a maroon T-shirt, jean shorts and some old pins he found at his grandmother's house, James considers himself the manager. He supervises advertising, money-handling and customer service, and he takes his job seriously - even if he does work barefoot. But this isn't an ordinary operation. James is spending part of his summer running a lemonade stand to raise money for the American Cancer Society. And he's only 9 years old. "I was at a restaurant and I was just squeezing lemons into my water," said James, a rising fifth-grader at Stevens Forest Elementary School.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | May 16, 2006
In a small Mexican village right now, there are dozens of people walking around wearing T-shirts bearing the name of a horse. In a small Pennsylvania town, there's a terminally ill man who counts the past year as a blessed gift, afforded to him by a horse. And that horse? Just 12 months removed from one of the most amazing Preakness wins in the race's 130-year history, Afleet Alex is grazing on some of Kentucky's finest bluegrass, living the life young colts dream about. In just one year's time, we can already say this much: There has been no racehorse in recent memory whose impact and influence have stretched so far, so quickly.
NEWS
May 7, 2006
Applebee's to open in Aberdeen The Rose Group, a casual-dining franchise company, will celebrate the opening of its Aberdeen Applebee's Neighborhood Grill & Bar with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and invitation-only reception at 4:45 p.m. tomorrow. The restaurant is at 991 Beards Hill Road and will open to the public at 11 a.m. Tuesday. The restaurant will dedicate a wall section to honor Cal Ripken Sr., Cal Ripken Jr. and Bill Ripken as "Hometown Heroes" for their professional achievements and strong focus on giving back to the community.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | August 12, 2009
Sophia Litrenta is planning to open a lemonade stand Tuesday. The 9-year-old is still working out the details but she thinks she'll charge 50 cents a cup. She wants to raise $200, an ambitious goal that means selling 400 cups in the two hours her stand in Lutherville will be open. None of this is exactly exceptional except that Sophia plans to donate her earnings to the Baltimore Police Department Mounted Unit, which had its funding cut and is now seeking the public's help raising $200,000 to keep officers on horseback for at least another year.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
Prayers, angels and dreams were in the minds of nearly all of Afleet Alex's owners before the 130th running of the Preakness Stakes at Pimlico Race Course yesterday. Little did they know how much they'd need them all. "Before this race, I had little Alex Scott and her little lemonade stand on my mind," said Chuck Zacney. "Right before the race, I said we need the little angels, and they came through." Zacney put together the five-person ownership group Cash is King Stable. And when he talks about Alex Scott, he is referring to the brave 8-year-old girl who fought cancer for 7 1/2 years before dying last August.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 20, 2005
Decisions about pricing, product mix and location tumbled through Alex Waggoner's mind as he started his enterprise. His business adviser observed his interactions with potential customers and counseled him about a more aggressive sales approach. Was he a hot-shot Wharton graduate working with a venture capitalist? No, Alex was just 6, setting up a summer lemonade stand in Seattle, and his business adviser was his mother. Now 7 and in his second year as a lemonade salesman, Alex has decided to post signs in his neighborhood, directing people to his stand, "instead of yelling as they go by."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2005
ELMONT, N.Y. - The Triple Crown series, which began with such competitive promise five weeks ago, has come down to one horse and a thousand lemonade stands. Of all the horses who ventured down the Triple Crown trail, Afleet Alex has established the best record and claimed the most hearts. He will be heavily favored today at Belmont Park to add the $1 million Belmont Stakes, the third leg of the Triple Crown, to his impressive resume. The tireless colt has won five stakes races, as many as the other 10 Belmont horses combined.
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