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By Michael Dresser | December 8, 1999
1998 Robert Pecota Sauvignon Blanc, Monterey County ($13).This is not a chardonnay aspiring to be sauvignon blanc. The reliable Pecota winery has fashioned a crisp, unapologetically herbal, refreshing sauvignon blanc that is true to the grape's Loire Valley heritage. It offers an array of clean, fresh flavors: chalk, lemon peel, figs. This wine is not for everyone, but true sauvignon blanc devotees will be thrilled with its intensity and almost musical clarity. Serve it with a lighter-type seafood.
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By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 11, 2013
Anne Kilmurray from Pottsville, Pa., was looking for a recipe for tomato jelly or tomato preserves. She used to have an old recipe of her mother's but she has misplaced it and the farmers' market in her area used to sell a good one but no longer does. She said all she can remember about her mother's recipe is that it contained lemon peel. Kay Shultz from Ellicott City shared her mother's recipe for making homemade tomato preserves. She said that her mother would core the tomatoes and include the seeds but that she removes most of the seeds when she makes it now. She added lemon peel to her version and she said she always loves to eat the peel after opening the jar. No store-bought tomato preserves can compare with one made from tomatoes from your garden or local farmers' market.
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By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Evening Sun Staff | January 15, 1992
THESE COOKIES HAVE gone on a diet. Margarine has replaced the butter, and egg whites have replaced the whole egg.Lemon Yogurt Cookies1/2 cup margarine, softened1 1/4 cups sugar1/2 cup plain nonfat yogurt2 egg whites1 tablespoon grated lemon peel1/2 teaspoon vanilla2 cups quick oats, uncooked1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour1 teaspoon baking powder1/2 teaspoon baking soda1/4 cup powdered sugarHeat oven to 375 degrees.Spray cookie sheet with no-stick cooking spray. Beat margarine and sugar until fluffy.
NEWS
By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,Los Angeles Times | June 11, 2008
Ciro Marino's torta di ricotta is an old-fashioned Italian chef's take on an old-fashioned Italian dessert. Marino, who doesn't even have a measuring spoon at Marino's, the Los Angeles restaurant he has helmed for 25 years, bakes his cake in the bottom of the oven, door propped open with an old saucepan (a method we updated), the cake insulated by a layer of crushed graham crackers tucked around the pan instead of a hot water bath. Marino's cheesecake is a paean to ricotta. It's made with 5 pounds of the glorious stuff.
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By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | August 28, 1991
Thanks to your microwave oven, you can make trying new vegetables, such as kohlrabi, quicker and easier than ever. This sweet and lemony side dish is ready for sampling in less than 10 minutes.In case you're wondering, kohlrabi is a round vegetable that tastes like a cross between a cabbage and a turnip. How do you prepare it? Cut off the top, then use a sharp knife to pull off the strips of woody peel.To cut kohlrabi into strips, first slice it crosswise into one-quarter-inch-thick slices, then cut the slices lengthwise.
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By Eleanor Freemark and Eleanor Freemark,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 25, 1993
My husband and I have quite a few things in common, of course, but none is as flavorful as our mutual love of lemons. We are lovers of the rich, lip-puckering taste, and over the years we have found the number of lemon aficionados we know may even surpass the number of chocoholics. We can't, however, bring ourselves to say, "lemonholics," so we call ourselves "lemonheads," instead.After we were married, the search for the perfect lemon pie began, and finally ended with my creating a pie with a perfect lemony flavor.
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By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE | January 10, 1996
Not all baked sweets have to be fattening. These light, fresh-tasting poppy citrus muffins contain less than one gram of fat per muffin, yet they taste rich and indulgent.The muffins are low in fat because they're made with skim milk and nonfat plain yogurt instead of butter, margarine or shortening. Yet they have plenty of fresh, memorable flavor courtesy of a combination of orange and lemon peels and crunchy, delicate poppy seeds. A delicious, sweet-sour glaze gives the final touch of flavor on top.You don't have to be a master baker to get good results from this recipe.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | May 23, 2007
Quinlan Cummings of Greenville, N.C., was looking for a recipe for a Lemon Chess Pie. Ruth Ann Barker of Fayetteville, N.C., sent in a recipe for the pie from the Farm Journal Complete Pie Cookbook published in 1965. She says this is a recipe she has enjoyed over the years. The recipe notes say that the filling can be baked in a traditional unbaked pie shell or that a graham-cracker or vanilla-wafer crumb crust can be substituted. I tested it in the traditional pastry crust. The finished pie was a beautiful lemon-yellow color inside and nut brown on top; it had a fine balance of tart and sweet.
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By Mary Carroll and Mary Carroll,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | December 3, 1995
There's nothing dull or unfestive about low-sugar desserts. Simple flavors predominate but are still rich-tasting: fruit and berries, sauces of red or white wines, tangy lemon and orange zest, spices like cinnamon and nutmeg -- all sweet-tooth satisfying without being overly sugary.Simplest are poached winter fruits. Pears, tart apples, dried apricots and dates simmered in strong-flavored liquid taste heavenly and slightly exotic. Wine and grape juice are my favorite poaching mediums. Since much of the alcohol in wine cooks off within 10 minutes, calories in wine-poached fruit are minimal.
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2001
Cheryl Nevitt of Spring Grove, Ill., requested a recipe for Lemon Bread. She writes that she made the bread in home-economics classes in junior high school "many years ago. It was more like a poundcake, not kneaded, and when it was finished and still warm, we poured a sort of lemon-juice mixture over the top. It was delicious. Any help would be appreciated." Jody McKean of Hot Springs, S.D., responded with a recipe she says came from a cookbook her daughter was selling when she was in high school in Moreno Valley, Calif.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | May 23, 2007
Quinlan Cummings of Greenville, N.C., was looking for a recipe for a Lemon Chess Pie. Ruth Ann Barker of Fayetteville, N.C., sent in a recipe for the pie from the Farm Journal Complete Pie Cookbook published in 1965. She says this is a recipe she has enjoyed over the years. The recipe notes say that the filling can be baked in a traditional unbaked pie shell or that a graham-cracker or vanilla-wafer crumb crust can be substituted. I tested it in the traditional pastry crust. The finished pie was a beautiful lemon-yellow color inside and nut brown on top; it had a fine balance of tart and sweet.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2001
Cheryl Nevitt of Spring Grove, Ill., requested a recipe for Lemon Bread. She writes that she made the bread in home-economics classes in junior high school "many years ago. It was more like a poundcake, not kneaded, and when it was finished and still warm, we poured a sort of lemon-juice mixture over the top. It was delicious. Any help would be appreciated." Jody McKean of Hot Springs, S.D., responded with a recipe she says came from a cookbook her daughter was selling when she was in high school in Moreno Valley, Calif.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | December 26, 1999
This week's menusEach day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and- eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meat- less or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's...
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | December 8, 1999
1998 Robert Pecota Sauvignon Blanc, Monterey County ($13).This is not a chardonnay aspiring to be sauvignon blanc. The reliable Pecota winery has fashioned a crisp, unapologetically herbal, refreshing sauvignon blanc that is true to the grape's Loire Valley heritage. It offers an array of clean, fresh flavors: chalk, lemon peel, figs. This wine is not for everyone, but true sauvignon blanc devotees will be thrilled with its intensity and almost musical clarity. Serve it with a lighter-type seafood.
NEWS
By Jane Snow and Jane Snow,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 7, 1999
Looking back through my menu book is like visiting with friends. Originally, I started keeping track of menus I served to friends to make sure I didn't repeat myself. But soon the menu book became an end in itself, a reminder of good times and good dinners that have spanned two decades.I like to trace the culinary threads that run for a year or two, then are replaced with the next knockout dish or favored ingredient.Some dishes have endured to this day because they're so scrumptious. I still make fresh sauteed morels on toast points, paella and bouillabaisse.
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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1997
You can use Asian ingredients in simple ways -- tossing some cilantro or minced lemon grass in chicken soup, adding enoki mushrooms to a salad, or tossing hot pasta with scallions, ginger, garlic and grilled chicken and a little peanut or sesame oil.Or you can use them in Asian dishes. Here are some recipe suggestions for using Asian ingredients in fairly simple ways.The first recipe is from "Beyond Bok Choy," by Rosa Lo San Ross.Candied lotus rootMakes about 1 cup1/2 pound lotus root, peeled and sliced 1/4 inch thickSYRUP:1 cup sugar2 slices fresh ginger1 star anise1 piece lemon peel, 1/2 by 2 inches1 tablespoon lemon juicePlace the lotus slices in a saucepan and cover with water.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | January 24, 1991
If many artists rushed to embrace the exciting new movements in 20th century art, others reacted by embracing the old master painters of the past. A leader among the artistic conservatives was Frenchman Jacques Maroger, whose strong Baltimore connection resulted in a host of local pupils who still carry on in his style.An exhibit at The Life of Maryland Gallery features work by Maroger and 22 other artists who either studied directly with him or who have studied with his pupils. The man they emulate was Parisian-born and worked for years at the Louvre, where he studied the painting techniques of the old master artists so well represented in that collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 11, 2013
Anne Kilmurray from Pottsville, Pa., was looking for a recipe for tomato jelly or tomato preserves. She used to have an old recipe of her mother's but she has misplaced it and the farmers' market in her area used to sell a good one but no longer does. She said all she can remember about her mother's recipe is that it contained lemon peel. Kay Shultz from Ellicott City shared her mother's recipe for making homemade tomato preserves. She said that her mother would core the tomatoes and include the seeds but that she removes most of the seeds when she makes it now. She added lemon peel to her version and she said she always loves to eat the peel after opening the jar. No store-bought tomato preserves can compare with one made from tomatoes from your garden or local farmers' market.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 25, 1996
Since 1930, 30 million copies of "Better Homes and Gardens New Cookbook," an unfailingly accurate, red-and-white checked kitchen companion, have rolled off the presses and into the country's kitchens. Dog-eared, gravy-spattered copies of the spiral-bound cookbook have served as culinary bibles for generations of American cooks.An 11th edition (Meredith, $25.95) has just been issued, which assuredly will introduce a new crop of users to its common-sense, mainstream approach.Lemon grass, mascarpone, quinoa and mesclun are some foods that have moved into the cookbook.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE | January 10, 1996
Not all baked sweets have to be fattening. These light, fresh-tasting poppy citrus muffins contain less than one gram of fat per muffin, yet they taste rich and indulgent.The muffins are low in fat because they're made with skim milk and nonfat plain yogurt instead of butter, margarine or shortening. Yet they have plenty of fresh, memorable flavor courtesy of a combination of orange and lemon peels and crunchy, delicate poppy seeds. A delicious, sweet-sour glaze gives the final touch of flavor on top.You don't have to be a master baker to get good results from this recipe.
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