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Lemon Law

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By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | February 21, 1991
Mickey O'Malley bought his 32-foot cabin cruiser, dreaming of a sweet life on the Severn.But the Crownsville resident says his dream soured when he realized he had purchased a lemon.In the water barely 11 hours, O'Malley's $68,500 boat broke down."When we first saw the boat, it had cosmetic problems," O'Malley said. "The dealer said not to worry. Then, 15 minutes away from the pier, we had engine problems and ended up stranded on a sand bar."Then, the boat began to list 4 inches to the left.
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NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2001
Commercial contractor Joseph W. Schmitz Jr. of Gamber has owned more than 40 Chevrolet trucks over the years, and had always been pleased with their performance. So, when he noticed that his 1997 Chevrolet Astro van was pulling to the right, and violently so upon braking, he returned it to the dealership for service. Between October 1996 and July 1997, mechanics at Chevrolet dealerships in Glen Burnie and Westminster tried seven times to fix the problem. Seven times they failed. Finally, engineers for General Motors Corp.
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NEWS
By Ellen Hawks | January 24, 1992
People who purchase new automobiles are protected by a so-called "lemon law."Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, D-3rd, thinks purchasers of those cuddly little puppies you can find in your friendly neighborhood mall or from a guy named Bubba should also receive such protection.So, Mr. Cardin has a resolution in Congress that recommends providing financial reimbursement to purchasers of faulty puppies.And, predictably, dog fanciers are howling. In the long run though, Mr. Cardin's resolution might have more bark than bite.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2001
Commercial contractor Joseph W. Schmitz Jr. of Gamber has owned more than 40 Chevrolet trucks over the years, and had always been pleased with their performance. So, when he noticed that his 1997 Chevrolet Astro van was pulling to the right, and violently so upon braking, he returned it to the dealership for service. Between October 1996 and July 1997, mechanics at Chevrolet dealerships in Glen Burnie and Westminster tried seven times to fix the problem. Seven times they failed. Finally, engineers for General Motors Corp.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks | January 24, 1992
People who purchase new automobiles are protected by a so-called "lemon law".Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, D-3rd, thinks purchasers of those cuddly little puppies you can find in your friendly neighborhood mall or from a guy named Bubba should also receive such protection.So, Mr. Cardin has introduced a resolution in Congress that recommends providing financial reimbursement to purchasers of faulty puppies.And, predictably, dog fanciers are howling. In the long run though, Mr. Cardin's resolution might have more bark than bite.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2001
Commercial contractor Joseph W. Schmitz Jr. of Gamber has owned more than 40 Chevrolet trucks over the years, and had always been pleased with their performance. So, when he noticed that his 1997 Chevrolet Astro van was pulling to the right, and violently so upon braking, he returned it to the dealership for service. Between October 1996 and July 1997, mechanics at Chevrolet dealerships in Glen Burnie and Westminster tried seven times to fix the problem. Seven times they failed. Finally, engineers for General Motors Corp.
BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | October 30, 1994
Q: Does Maryland have a "lemon law" to protect homebuyers? We settled on our home and then several months later discovered problems with the heating and air-conditioning system.Carol LeBlanc, Bel AirA: Generally speaking, there is no "lemon law" in Maryland that covers the purchase of a home, as there is for the sale of automobiles. "Let the buyer beware" are still the watchwords when buying a house.Maryland law typically holds that a deed -- written as a result of a sales contract -- merges the provisions of the contract, as well as all negotiations and agreements leading up to the execution of the deed, into the deed.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | February 27, 1991
State legislators have deep-sixed a proposed boat lemon law.The House Economic Matters Committee voted, 20-0, Saturday against the bill introduced by Delegate Marsha G. Perry, D-Crofton. The bill would have required manufacturers to replace chronically flawed boats or refund their owners."The committee just didn't hear enough support for the bill," said committee member Charles W. "Stokes" Kolodziejski, D-Carvel Beach. "It seemed like there was only one person involved."Perry introduced the bill at the request of Crownsville resident Mickey O'Malley, president of Marylanders for a Boat Lemon Law.At a hearing two weeks ago, O'Malley said he discovered 32 manufacturing flaws in the $68,000 cabin cruiser he purchased in 1987.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2001
Commercial contractor Joseph W. Schmitz Jr. of Gamber has owned more than 40 Chevrolet trucks over the years, and had always been pleased with their performance. So, when he noticed that his 1997 Chevrolet Astro van was pulling to the right, and violently so upon braking, he returned it to the dealership for service. Between October 1996 and July 1997, mechanics at Chevrolet dealerships in Glen Burnie and Westminster tried seven times to fix the problem. Seven times they failed. Finally, engineers for General Motors Corp.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Max-a-million had a deprived puppyhood.Raised in squalor and neglect at a Nebraska "puppy mill," the 4-year-old cocker spaniel wound up in Baltimore. But his sorry Midwestern life haunted him -- and his owner -- through health problems that required three bladder operations.Max-a-million is his name "because that's what he's costing me," said Theresa Pulice-Wingate yesterday. The 28-year-old Baltimore woman's "nightmare" began 2 1/2 years ago and included a $2,500 veterinarian's bill.
BUSINESS
By Michael Gisriel | October 30, 1994
Q: Does Maryland have a "lemon law" to protect homebuyers? We settled on our home and then several months later discovered problems with the heating and air-conditioning system.Carol LeBlanc, Bel AirA: Generally speaking, there is no "lemon law" in Maryland that covers the purchase of a home, as there is for the sale of automobiles. "Let the buyer beware" are still the watchwords when buying a house.Maryland law typically holds that a deed -- written as a result of a sales contract -- merges the provisions of the contract, as well as all negotiations and agreements leading up to the execution of the deed, into the deed.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks | January 24, 1992
People who purchase new automobiles are protected by a so-called "lemon law."Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, D-3rd, thinks purchasers of those cuddly little puppies you can find in your friendly neighborhood mall or from a guy named Bubba should also receive such protection.So, Mr. Cardin has a resolution in Congress that recommends providing financial reimbursement to purchasers of faulty puppies.And, predictably, dog fanciers are howling. In the long run though, Mr. Cardin's resolution might have more bark than bite.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks | January 24, 1992
People who purchase new automobiles are protected by a so-called "lemon law".Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, D-3rd, thinks purchasers of those cuddly little puppies you can find in your friendly neighborhood mall or from a guy named Bubba should also receive such protection.So, Mr. Cardin has introduced a resolution in Congress that recommends providing financial reimbursement to purchasers of faulty puppies.And, predictably, dog fanciers are howling. In the long run though, Mr. Cardin's resolution might have more bark than bite.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Max-a-million had a deprived puppyhood.Raised in squalor and neglect at a Nebraska "puppy mill," the 4-year-old cocker spaniel wound up in Baltimore. But his sorry Midwestern life haunted him -- and his owner -- through health problems that required three bladder operations.Max-a-million is his name "because that's what he's costing me," said Theresa Pulice-Wingate yesterday. The 28-year-old Baltimore woman's "nightmare" began 2 1/2 years ago and included a $2,500 veterinarian's bill.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | February 27, 1991
State legislators have deep-sixed a proposed boat lemon law.The House Economic Matters Committee voted, 20-0, Saturday against the bill introduced by Delegate Marsha G. Perry, D-Crofton. The bill would have required manufacturers to replace chronically flawed boats or refund their owners."The committee just didn't hear enough support for the bill," said committee member Charles W. "Stokes" Kolodziejski, D-Carvel Beach. "It seemed like there was only one person involved."Perry introduced the bill at the request of Crownsville resident Mickey O'Malley, president of Marylanders for a Boat Lemon Law.At a hearing two weeks ago, O'Malley said he discovered 32 manufacturing flaws in the $68,000 cabin cruiser he purchased in 1987.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | February 21, 1991
Mickey O'Malley bought his 32-foot cabin cruiser, dreaming of a sweet life on the Severn.But the Crownsville resident says his dream soured when he realized he had purchased a lemon.In the water barely 11 hours, O'Malley's $68,500 boat broke down."When we first saw the boat, it had cosmetic problems," O'Malley said. "The dealer said not to worry. Then, 15 minutes away from the pier, we had engine problems and ended up stranded on a sand bar."Then, the boat began to list 4 inches to the left.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Daily News | September 21, 1990
LOS ANGELES -- A class-action lawsuit has been filed on behalf of three Southern Californians against General Motors Corp., charging the company with ignoring state and federal "lemon laws" designed to protect consumers.Attorney Norman F. Taylor, who specializes in lemon-law cases, said the Los Angeles Superior Court suit could involve up to 60,000 GM car owners in California and damages as high as $1 billion.Steve and Jane Hernandez of Palmdale and Verna Webster of suburban Granada Hills are the original plaintiffs in the suit, which accuses GM of willfully violating lemon laws,refusing to honor its warranties as advertised and fighting "tooth and nail" against consumers who seek relief under the laws.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1990
Flight attendants, USAir OK pactUSAir and its flight attendants have agreed on a new 18-month contract after more than one year of negotations, the Association of Flight Attendants said today."
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Daily News | September 21, 1990
LOS ANGELES -- A class-action lawsuit has been filed on behalf of three Southern Californians against General Motors Corp., charging the company with ignoring state and federal "lemon laws" designed to protect consumers.Attorney Norman F. Taylor, who specializes in lemon-law cases, said the Los Angeles Superior Court suit could involve up to 60,000 GM car owners in California and damages as high as $1 billion.Steve and Jane Hernandez of Palmdale and Verna Webster of suburban Granada Hills are the original plaintiffs in the suit, which accuses GM of willfully violating lemon laws,refusing to honor its warranties as advertised and fighting "tooth and nail" against consumers who seek relief under the laws.
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