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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | April 27, 1994
Q: I tried a Thai recipe that called for smashing the lemon grass and then chopping before adding to a soup. The flavor was delicious, but the pieces of lemon grass were quite unpleasant to pick out. Any suggestions?A: The best way to get the essence without the woody slivers is to remove any tough outer stalks, flatten the grass by hitting sharply with the side of a cleaver or chef's knife, tying the lemon grass into a knot, simmering and then removing in one piece when the dish is finished.
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NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS and ROBIN MATHER JENKINS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 31, 2006
One of the signature flavors in Thai and Vietnamese dishes, lemon grass has a light, citrusy, floral scent that may seem immediately familiar. That's because the plant it comes from also gives us citronella, the scented oil that is said to repel mosquitoes. It's easy to grow lemon grass, starting with purchased stalks. "Choose the freshest, plumpest-looking stalks at the store," says yougrowgirl.com, a gardening Web site. Put the stalks into a jar of water and place near a sunny window.
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NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS and ROBIN MATHER JENKINS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 31, 2006
One of the signature flavors in Thai and Vietnamese dishes, lemon grass has a light, citrusy, floral scent that may seem immediately familiar. That's because the plant it comes from also gives us citronella, the scented oil that is said to repel mosquitoes. It's easy to grow lemon grass, starting with purchased stalks. "Choose the freshest, plumpest-looking stalks at the store," says yougrowgirl.com, a gardening Web site. Put the stalks into a jar of water and place near a sunny window.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | September 8, 2004
2002 Dog Point Vineyard Section 94, Marlborough ($18). New Zealand sauvignon blancs can be an acquired taste, but thanks to the winemaker's decision to use barrel fermentation, this one may be more accessible than most. It's a dry wine that could have been severe except for its tremendous fruitiness, which gives the impression of sugar without significant residual sugar. But don't be fooled; this puppy still has plenty of bite. Its penetrating, crystalline flavors include gooseberry, lime, grapefruit, lemon grass and herbs.
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By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 1998
People love lemons so much they use them in everything from soft drinks to pies to floor wax. Mother Nature must love lemons, too, because she puts the citrusy flavor and scent into so many things besides the fruit we squeeze into ice tea. There is a smorgasbord of lemony herbs, many of which have the added benefit of attracting bees to pollinate the rest of your garden.Although you can tuck them into any pot or sunny corner, you can also devote a space entirely to citrus plants. One simple yet elegant lemon garden takes its cue from monastery herb gardens, which blend classical symmetry with barely managed chaos.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | May 14, 2003
2000 Murphy-Goode Reserve Fume, Alexander Valley ($17). This excellent, mature sauvignon blanc is a wine of impressive body and complexity, enhanced by the judicious use of oak. It gives tasters a fascinating mix of flavors, with hints of melon, pear, nutmeg, chalk and lemon grass. This would be best served with full-flavored seafood such as salmon or swordfish -- especially if grilled.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | April 4, 2004
Around this time of the year, I find myself staring at the calendar, which has proudly proclaimed the arrival of spring. But just because it's official doesn't mean Mother Nature has taken the message, particularly in New England, where I live. Days are still chilly here, and our yard is far from the vibrant green it will be in another month. I've come to think of the beginning weeks of the new season as a transitional time, when winter hangs on with a touch of cold while spring gently tries to make an appearance with longer days and by coaxing the arrival of early bulbs and herbs, now peeking through the ground.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | May 3, 1992
Salmon responds well to a range of cooking methods. Classical cookery often recommends poaching whole salmon but few cooks have the unwieldy fish poacher on hand. Fortunately, there are other options which favor the more convenient fillets and steaks.With its high oil content, salmon does very well on the grill. It cabe grilled plain or bathed in a marinade. The charcoal taste is enough of a flavor enhancement but a small amount of mesquite wood mixed in with the charcoal lends a nuance.Indoors, broiling, steaming, pan cooking, baking and microwavcooking all work well with salmon.
FEATURES
October 30, 1991
Thai Flank SteakMarinade:1 stalk lemon grass1 Thai red, habanero or other hot pepper1 shallot, peeled3 tablespoons fresh lime juice2 tablespoons vegetable oil1 tablespoon each: nam pla or nuoc mam (fish sauce), hoisin sauce, light brown sugar1 flank steak, about 1 1/4 poundsRelish:1 large cucumber1 small onion2 Thai red, habanero or other hot pepper1 stalk lemon grass1/4 cup seasoned rice vinegar (sushi vinegar)For serving:2 small heads Boston letuce1/4 cup chopped cilantroLime wedgesFor the marinade, remove outer layers from the lemon grass and trim it down to the soft, inner core.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
"I have always been adventuresome" when it comes to food, says Ann Wilder. "I got that from my father, who was a very adventuresome eater."But desite visiting raw bars and downing oysters at a tender age, Wilder, owner of Vann's spices in Towson, didn't learn to cook until after she got married."The first meal I prepared was simply not edible," she says, laughing at the memory."The fried chicken caught on fire, the rice was library paste -- I thought you were supposed to cook everything forever."
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | April 4, 2004
Around this time of the year, I find myself staring at the calendar, which has proudly proclaimed the arrival of spring. But just because it's official doesn't mean Mother Nature has taken the message, particularly in New England, where I live. Days are still chilly here, and our yard is far from the vibrant green it will be in another month. I've come to think of the beginning weeks of the new season as a transitional time, when winter hangs on with a touch of cold while spring gently tries to make an appearance with longer days and by coaxing the arrival of early bulbs and herbs, now peeking through the ground.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 28, 2003
A THREE-STAR chef cooks differently from you and me. He wraps sea bass in lettuce leaves and plastic wrap and steams it in a woven basket. Instead of the usual chicken, he cooks poussins, small tender birds, and serves them on mounds of fragrant rice topped with crisp, fried arugula. When it comes time for dessert, he doesn't break out the Ben & Jerry's. Rather he poaches pears in a mixture of Sauternes, lemon, honey and vanilla. Those were the dishes that Michel Roux glided through one recent afternoon as he gave a cooking demonstration at the Inn at Little Washington in Washington, Va. It was one of a few stops in the United States Roux made promoting his new book, Michel Roux: New Creative Techniques From a French Master Chef (Rizzoli, 2003, $39.95)
TRAVEL
By Patricia Rodriguez and Patricia Rodriguez,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | September 15, 2002
After sleeping fitfully on the night train from Hanoi (Note to self: Drink fewer liquids before a 10-hour journey on a train where the bathroom is a hole in the floor two cars down), we are herded onto a waiting minibus for the drive to Sa Pa. The highlands village of Sa Pa, a 90-minute ride from Lao Cai, a trade center on the Vietnam-China border, has been billed as a bucolic paradise, green, peaceful and mostly unspoiled by modern commerce. But the morning is hazy and foggy and still a bit dark, and as our van struggles through traffic-choked streets, I can't see much of anything.
FEATURES
By SARA ENGRAM | September 19, 2001
Kids and sushi Every culture has its favorite finger food. Tricycle Press, the children's book division of Ten Speed Press, is initiating a World Snacks series to introduce our littlest eaters to bite-sized foods from around the world. First Book of Sushi features colorful illustrations and rhyming text to inform and charm eaters big and small. A sample: "Miso in my sippy cup, tofu in my bowl. Crab and avocado fill my California roll. I'll take yellowtail hamachi and a red maguro slice.
FEATURES
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 1998
People love lemons so much they use them in everything from soft drinks to pies to floor wax. Mother Nature must love lemons, too, because she puts the citrusy flavor and scent into so many things besides the fruit we squeeze into ice tea. There is a smorgasbord of lemony herbs, many of which have the added benefit of attracting bees to pollinate the rest of your garden.Although you can tuck them into any pot or sunny corner, you can also devote a space entirely to citrus plants. One simple yet elegant lemon garden takes its cue from monastery herb gardens, which blend classical symmetry with barely managed chaos.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1997
From amaranth to fish sauce, from lemon grass to won-ton wrappers, Asian ingredients increasingly are showing up on grocery shelves -- to the delight of the cognoscenti and perhaps to the puzzlement of the ordinary cook."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 5, 1990
In the "old days" -- let's say before 1980 or so -- when an Asian restaurant "Westernized" its cuisine, gourmets shuddered. Those were the early days of culinary ethnic awareness and the rise of the Sichuan dynasty, and Westernization (which usually meant altering traditional dishes to suit the pusillanimous palate of middle-class Americans)was tantamount to bastardization.But during the past decade celebrity chefs such as Wolfgang Puck and Ken Hom, pioneers of the so-called "East-West" cuisine, and local restaurants such as the Orchid and Stixx set about proving that a mix of Oriental and Western ingredients and techniques could draw from the strengths of both cultures.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1997
You can use Asian ingredients in simple ways -- tossing some cilantro or minced lemon grass in chicken soup, adding enoki mushrooms to a salad, or tossing hot pasta with scallions, ginger, garlic and grilled chicken and a little peanut or sesame oil.Or you can use them in Asian dishes. Here are some recipe suggestions for using Asian ingredients in fairly simple ways.The first recipe is from "Beyond Bok Choy," by Rosa Lo San Ross.Candied lotus rootMakes about 1 cup1/2 pound lotus root, peeled and sliced 1/4 inch thickSYRUP:1 cup sugar2 slices fresh ginger1 star anise1 piece lemon peel, 1/2 by 2 inches1 tablespoon lemon juicePlace the lotus slices in a saucepan and cover with water.
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