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NEWS
April 21, 1999
ABDELAZIZ Bouteflika became foreign minister of Algeria at age 25 in 1965 and made it a home for Third World revolutionary rhetoric. Thirteen years later, he was accused of embezzlement. Instead of rising to the presidency then, he has spent most of his time since 1980 in comfortable exile. Now he is elected president with the favor of the generals he had served and then fled.Mr. Bouteflika won 74 percent of the vote with a 60 percent turnout, if you want to believe the official tally. Ahmed Taleb Ibrahimi, who had conducted the audit accusing Mr. Bouteflika two decades ago and succeeded him as foreign minister, came in a distant second with 12.5 percent.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
For the past two decades, schools across the country have pushed students to take high level math classes even when they aren't prepared for them. The result, says Tom Loveless  in a blog post from the Brown Center on Education Policy, is that students arrive at college believing they are ready when they are not. A study released Wednesday by the Brookings Institution's Loveless looks at Algebra II. In 1986, less than half of all 17-year-olds (44 percent) had completed Algebra II, Loveless said. By last year, three-fourths of students completed Algebra II. Despite this huge increase, scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress have not increased as would be expected.
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NEWS
April 13, 1999
THE VOTE for president Thursday gives Algeria a chance to end the dreadful murder and strife that have gripped it since the last election was annulled in 1992. The terrorists of the Armed Islamic Group (GIA) have not agreed to it, but the outlawed Islamic Salvation Front (FIS) has. A credible result could create a legitimacy terrorists could not overthrow.President Liamine Zeroual, a general picked by generals, is stepping out 18 months before the end of his term to make the election possible.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 2, 2012
I interviewed Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer last year, and - let me put it this way - I can't think of anyone less qualified to replace Rush Limbaugh as a radio talk show host. Thoughtful, wise, a little dry and measured in his words, Justice Breyer seemed to be everything Americans should want in a judge. He betrayed no particular ideology during an hourlong conversation about the Supreme Court's role in our democracy. He politely refused to answer a question related to a case before the court.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Jay Hancock and Tom Bowman and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 2000
WASHINGTON - The nation's top African-American leaders questioned yesterday the legitimacy of Texas Gov. George W. Bush's expected presidential victory, saying it was secured by the U.S. Supreme Court and not by the voters. "He will be president legally. But he does not have moral authority, because his crown did not come from the people. It came from the judges," the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson said on CNN after leading a rally of hundreds of blacks and union members in Tallahassee, Fla. Blacks voted for Gore by a 9-to-1 margin, according to various analyses after the election.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | April 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - The U.S. operation in Iraq is hanging by a thread. If it has any hope of surviving this moment, we need three conversations to happen fast: George W. Bush needs to talk to his father, the Arab leaders need to talk to their sons - and daughters - and we need to talk to the Iraqi Governing Council. President Bush, please call home. You need some of your father's wisdom right now. The old man, Bush 41, may not have had the vision thing, but he did have the prudence thing. He understood that he could not expel Saddam Hussein from Kuwait without a real coalition that included Egypt, Syria, Saudi Arabia and other key Arab states, not to mention all the NATO allies and the United Nations.
NEWS
June 1, 1997
PARLIAMENTARY elections in Indonesia on Thursday were meant to confer legitimacy on the 30-year rule of President Suharto. It did no such thing.The regime allows two opposition parties, which it controls. One of them was running behind its customary 15 percent, reflecting protest against the purge of its rightful leader, Megawati Sukarnoputri.Mr. Suharto is expected to run next year, age 76, for a seventh term. His rule has finally unleashed the economy, making the fourth most populous country Asia's latest tiger.
NEWS
By MARK CLARENCE WALKER | October 14, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Referendums do not resolve underlying conflicts and tensions. That is the essential problem with tomorrow's Iraqi referendum on a new constitution. Referendums work well in providing popular legitimacy - the coin of the realm in a democratic process - but they cannot make people get along or establish a democratic state, like Athena sprung from the head of Zeus. And in the face of substantial disagreements over how power is distributed within a state, the warm glow that referendums engender from the legitimacy they bestow often fades back into the black of dissenting opinions at best and violence at worst.
NEWS
January 26, 2001
NO ONE had more fun being president than Joseph Estrada. He spent his 31 months as the immensely popular elected leader of the Philippines drinking, gambling, womanizing and taking bribes. He was no tyrant, but rather an incompetent slob -- too undisciplined and shallow to run the affairs of 80 million people. Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, who ascended to the vacated presidency on Saturday, holds a doctorate in economics, a mandate as elected vice president and priorities to restore the economy and body politic.
NEWS
June 30, 1993
It turned out that the people of Nigeria who voted for a president June 12 took it seriously and did not want the dictator, Ibrahim Babangida, to suspend the result. The labor strike and lawyers' strike and other signs of protest still building steam appeared to take him by surprise.President Babangida promised to turn power over to an elected civilian president on Aug. 27. He held an election for president, limited to two candidates acceptable to him, one of whom won. Others of his friends went to court to get the count suspended.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun Reporter | March 26, 2007
An Ehrlich administration loyalist questioned the legitimacy of a firm headed by GOP strategist Carol L. Hirschburg during a pre-bid session held before the firm's inclusion in a $110 million technology contract with the Maryland Department of Human Resources, according to a transcript of the meeting obtained by The Sun. During the January 2006 meeting, former state transportation administrator Gregory J. Maddalone asked whether Hirschburg's firm would...
NEWS
October 1, 2006
Remember the purple fingers? It was January 2005, and they meant that elections and democracy and freedom were on the march in Iraq, at least in the eyes of the Bush administration and its supporters. The president still believes in that forward progress, and that American benevolence is making it possible. But it's a good thing for him he doesn't have to answer to Iraqi public opinion, because substantial majorities there disagree with him. A poll taken in September for the Program on International Policy Attitudes at the University of Maryland found that 71 percent of Iraqis want the U.S. to withdraw within a year, 72 percent believe the presence of U.S. troops provokes more conflict than it prevents, 79 percent say the U.S. effect on Iraq is mostly negative, and a deeply troubling 61 percent say they approve of violent attacks on U.S. soldiers and Marines.
NEWS
By MARK CLARENCE WALKER | October 14, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Referendums do not resolve underlying conflicts and tensions. That is the essential problem with tomorrow's Iraqi referendum on a new constitution. Referendums work well in providing popular legitimacy - the coin of the realm in a democratic process - but they cannot make people get along or establish a democratic state, like Athena sprung from the head of Zeus. And in the face of substantial disagreements over how power is distributed within a state, the warm glow that referendums engender from the legitimacy they bestow often fades back into the black of dissenting opinions at best and violence at worst.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | May 22, 2005
AS GIACOMO received his post-race wash down outside the Stakes Barn at Pimlico late yesterday afternoon, professional photographers and well-wishers with disposable cameras snapped away at the third-place Preakness Stakes finisher. Gleefully aiming a digital nearby was Giacomo's co-owner, Jerry Moss. His face showed not a trace of disappointment that the Kentucky Derby winner didn't take the next step toward a Triple Crown, as six of the previous eight Derby winners had. Moss wasn't hanging his head.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 15, 2005
BELFAST, Northern Ireland - Five crying sisters each had a hand atop their murdered brother's casket as they walked to the altar of St. Matthew's Catholic Church, and the congregation sang "Here I Am Lord." And people who attended the funeral swore that enough tears flowed that the pews could have floated away. This funeral for Robert McCartney, killed in a bar fight with steel pipes to the head and a butcher knife slitting open his belly, followed a sad ritual well known to the people of St. Matthew's, the heart of the Short Strand, the tiny sliver of Catholic households in otherwise-Protestant East Belfast.
NEWS
December 15, 2004
Early elections key to bringing peace to Iraq The Sun's excellent editorial "Ballot questions" (Dec. 8) got it exactly right. The issue for the people of Iraq has always been the legitimacy of the U.S. role as an occupying power. The interim governments that we fashioned have lacked legitimacy, which fuels the vicious insurgency that has cost the lives of so many of our brave servicemen. That is why it is important to stick with the January date for elections in Iraq. Delay only means more death and destruction.
NEWS
July 14, 1994
Nigeria is too diverse and great a country for Gen. Sani Abacha, who seized power in November, to rule as his personal fiefdom. He pretends to have started up a constitutional process to replace the elected national legislature, state governments and local assemblies he dismantled. Actually, he is fighting the tides. Now he is taking on the oil industry work force, the source of Nigeria's wealth.It was quixotic of businessman Moshood K. O. Abiola to claim to be president of Africa's most populous country, last month, on the first anniversary of the election he won. The former strongman, Gen. Ibrahim Babangida, had suspended that vote, set up a puppet regime, then stepped down after protest by his countrymen.
NEWS
February 13, 1992
As good a claim as any to a share of the credit for the explosion of freedom that shattered the Soviet empire and ended the Cold War belongs to an anomaly called the CSCE, standing for Conference on Security and Co-operation in Europe. It is not an organization, like NATO or the European Community, for it has no headquarters or staff. Its actions are not treaties or regulations, or even decisions, for their only effect is moral suasion. It is something like a floating poker game, for there is a certain amount of bluffing and calling, raising and folding, but the game is diplomacy and the chips are a series of prolix reports with names like the Helsinki Final Act and the Copenhagen Document.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 1, 2004
UNITED NATIONS - The United Nations proposed the most sweeping changes in its history yesterday, recommending the overhaul of its key decision-making organ, the Security Council, and suggesting standards of international legitimacy for countries that have not been attacked to go to war against an enemy posing an imminent threat. The changes were outlined in a much-awaited, 101-recommendation report from a panel commissioned by Secretary-General Kofi Annan last year in the aftermath of bitter divisions that had left the United Nations feeling ill-equipped to meet challenges represented by terrorism, failed states, nuclear proliferation, poverty and mass violence.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 7, 2004
WASHINGTON -- President Bush points with pride to Saturday's presidential elections in Afghanistan -- the first nation invaded by U.S. forces under his leadership -- as a historic milestone in his strategy of combating terror by spreading democracy in the Muslim world. While continuing bloodshed undermines U.S. success in Iraq, the main target of Bush's aggressive policy in the region, the administration and the Bush-Cheney re-election campaign are highlighting the 2001 war in Afghanistan as a triumph for freedom, for improved American security and for women.
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