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NEWS
By Mark Bomster, Marina Sarris and Thomas W. Waldron | March 17, 1993
A bill to change the $7 million legislative scholarship program has passed the House of Delegates and is pending in the state Senate, along with other related reform efforts. The Sun yesterday asked 46 of the 47 senators if they support the change -- which would remove the scholarships from the arena )) of political patronage. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., who has strongly opposed such change, could not be reached to be interviewed.* Signifies a member of the Senate Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee.
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NEWS
April 5, 2010
The biggest item on the to-do list for the Maryland General Assembly in its final week is deciding on cuts to Gov. Martin O'Malley's budget proposal, and there are relatively few differences between the plans approved by the Senate and the House of Delegates. Each would shave about $125 million from the governor's $32 billion plan, significantly less than the $660 million the legislature cut last year or the $441 million it cut the year before. Whatever decisions the House and Senate make, this year's budget will be noteworthy as the first in recent history to be smaller than the budget from the previous year.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1997
Some members of the House of Delegates are trying once again to kill Maryland's $9 million legislative scholarship program because of criticism that it is more of a patronage tool than a means of providing student aid.But as usual, senators -- who dole out as much as $138,000 apiece, or more than 10 times what each delegate can award -- don't appear willing to give up the program, at least not this year."
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2005
In support of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s proposal to increase need-based student financial aid, two lawmakers urged a Senate committee yesterday to back bills that would transfer most or all of the money in Maryland's legislative scholarship program to a need-based fund. Sen. Sandra B. Schrader, a Howard County Republican, and Sen. James Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, are pushing two different bills, but both told the Senate Education, Health and Environment Committee that they believe it is time to change how the $11 million in legislative scholarship money is distributed.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2005
In support of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s proposal to increase need-based student financial aid, two lawmakers urged a Senate committee yesterday to back bills that would transfer most or all of the money in Maryland's legislative scholarship program to a need-based fund. Sen. Sandra B. Schrader, a Howard County Republican, and Sen. James Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, are pushing two different bills, but both told the Senate Education, Health and Environment Committee that they believe it is time to change how the $11 million in legislative scholarship money is distributed.
NEWS
April 5, 1994
It's a first. The state Senate committee that handles proposals to reform the legislative scholarship program apparently has enough votes to send the measure to the Senate floor -- where there also seems to be a majority to end this shameful political perk once and for all. (During recent General Assembly sessions, the House of Delegates has overwhelmingly approved reform bills.)Despite this unprecedented level of support, this year's legislation, which would transfer the more than $7 million in legislative grants to the control of the State Scholarship Administration, might be killed at the whim of one man.That man is Sen. Clarence Blount of Baltimore City, the Senate committee chairman who has stubbornly and most undemocratically refused to schedule a vote on the legislation.
NEWS
February 9, 1993
U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, whose 6th District includes a portion of Howard County, has drafted a piece of legislation that's half-right. Mr. Bartlett's bill would allow U.S. representatives to use surplus funds from their office accounts to reduce the national debt or establish scholarships for their constituents. Reducing the national debt is a good idea; establishing another congressional scholarship is not.At present, surpluses from congressional office accounts -- which pay for office supplies, mailings and staff salaries -- are deposited into the House fund where they sit for two years before being returned to the U.S. Treasury.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff Evening Sun reporter Marina Sarris contributed to this story | March 15, 1991
The state Senate has approved a $24 million plan to replace the state's college scholarship program with awards geared toward students from low- and middle-income families.The Educational Excellence Awards bill, approved by a 45-0 vote yesterday, includes a college prep program that would start targeting youngsters in junior high school.Overall, the proposal would help about 15,000 students attend college in the state, said Higher Education Secretary Shaila Aery.The scholarship plan, originally called "Free State" and recommended by the Maryland Higher Education Commission last fall, would more than double the $11.6 million currently offered to needy students.
NEWS
March 6, 1995
In drafting a measure to reform Maryland's legislative scholarship program, state Senate leaders have concocted a proposal they call "the best we can do."As bests go, we've seen better.The measure would replace the senatorial scholarship kitty with something called the Free State Community Scholarship Program. The main alteration? All grant recipients and grant amounts would be determined by nine-member committees representing each senatorial district. Each committee would consist of five local and state education officials, plus four appointees named by that district's senator.
NEWS
March 10, 1993
Past attempts to eliminate the General Assembly's needless and embarrassing legislative scholarship program tended to be half-hearted. While lawmakers paid lip service to the notion of reform, they never intended to deprive themselves of the political rTC benefit of awarding millions of taxpayer dollars in scholarships to the children of friends, constituents and well-connected associates.That is, until the current session in Annapolis.A bill authored by Democratic Del. Henry Heller of Montgomery County and co-sponsored by nearly 20 of his House colleagues overwhelmingly passed the lower chamber's Ways and Means Committee last week.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1998
Maryland teen-agers now have a new reason to spend all their free time in front of the computer: a chance to win a college scholarship.Under an ambitious program approved yesterday by the General Assembly, the state will pay $3,000 a year to B-average students who study science, engineering and computer fields at Maryland colleges and go to work for local companies.Gov. Parris N. Glendening sought the science and technology scholarships as a way to cultivate a qualified work force to keep high-tech firms from leaving Maryland in search of employees.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1997
Some members of the House of Delegates are trying once again to kill Maryland's $9 million legislative scholarship program because of criticism that it is more of a patronage tool than a means of providing student aid.But as usual, senators -- who dole out as much as $138,000 apiece, or more than 10 times what each delegate can award -- don't appear willing to give up the program, at least not this year."
NEWS
April 8, 1995
Any chance of reforming Maryland's embarrassing legislative scholarship program lies in the hands of state Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. As a leader of the conference committee that will attempt to draft a compromise measure suitable to members of both the Senate and the House of Delegates, Mr. Miller is in the crucial position of shepherding a reform that could eventually abolish the 127-year-old scholarship scam. He should make the most of this opportunity.The conference co-leader will be House Speaker Caspar R. Taylor Jr. His colleagues have willingly voted in recent years to kill the program.
NEWS
March 21, 1995
Don't be fooled by the efforts of state Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. and Sen. Clarence Blount of Baltimore City to craft so-called reform of Maryland's legislative scholarship program. It now appears that Messrs. Miller and Blount have been engaged in a scheme that they intend to fob off as earnest reform but actually is a cynical charade designed to keep the program going in its current form for many more years.Funded this year by $8.5 million in taxpayer dollars and prone in the past to abuses by the legislators who personally award the grants, the scholarship program finally became such an embarrassment that the House of Delegates has voted repeatedly in recent years to surrender its share of the pot to the State Scholarship Administration.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Mike Bowler contributed to this article | December 4, 1994
After years of political stalemate in Annapolis, the most powerful supporter of the state legislature's one-of-a-kind scholarship program says he will back a bill next year to eventually eliminate it.While details remain hazy, Sen. President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. said he expects legislation that would eliminate the program within four years or phase it out over the same time period. The pool of scholarship funds -- $7.9 million this year -- might then be allocated by the apolitical state scholarship administration or at the community level, he said.
NEWS
April 5, 1994
It's a first. The state Senate committee that handles proposals to reform the legislative scholarship program apparently has enough votes to send the measure to the Senate floor -- where there also seems to be a majority to end this shameful political perk once and for all. (During recent General Assembly sessions, the House of Delegates has overwhelmingly approved reform bills.)Despite this unprecedented level of support, this year's legislation, which would transfer the more than $7 million in legislative grants to the control of the State Scholarship Administration, might be killed at the whim of one man.That man is Sen. Clarence Blount of Baltimore City, the Senate committee chairman who has stubbornly and most undemocratically refused to schedule a vote on the legislation.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
Inspired by a "60 Minutes" segment on a Mississippi millionaire who gives college educations to poor students, the Maryland Higher Education Commission has approved a new scholarship program called the Free State.The program will use state funds to provide up to $3,000 annually in college scholarships to low-income and middle-income high school students if they enroll in and pass college prep courses beginning in the eighth grade. This represents an attempt to get students involved in college prep courses a year before high school.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Joe Nawrozki and Melody Simmons and Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff | September 19, 1990
A recommendation to make more scholarship funds available to poor and minority Maryland students was being presented to a committee of the Maryland Higher Education Commission today.The "Free State" plan would realign the method of distributing scholarship money to students based on income and college preparatory courses taken in high school. The plan will cost $24 million to implement over a five-year period if approved by the commission, said state Secretary of Higher Education Shaila Aery.
NEWS
March 1, 1994
Family CapI must confess to disbelief when I read your editorial, "Schaefer's Family Cap" (Feb. 14).You state that advocates for the poor who object to the family cap -- a policy recommendation to deny a welfare grant increment of about $80 to a child born into a welfare family -- should go along with the recommendation, simply because the political reality of the issue gives it widespread public support.You also state the family cap policy is symbolic.While most of us expect elected officials to reflect their constituents' beliefs, we also should expect that they will do their best to educate us about the effects of their policy decisions.
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