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Legislative Redistricting

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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
Maryland's legislative redistricting plan is legal and should be allowed to stand, a special master appointed by the Court of Appeals said in his opinion released yesterday.The 34-page opinion, which rejects 10 objections to the plan, is not the final word. However, it does indicate how the Court of Appeals will handle the issue.Last year, Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the General Assembly adopted the plan over the protests of Baltimore and Montgomery County legislators, state Republicans and the NAACP.
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NEWS
May 2, 2014
One of the most cynical and self-serving actions taken by the General Assembly was moving the primary election from September to June Rather than try to stimulate greater voter turnout and public participation in the political process, the June date seeks to depress it. More families are on vacation in June, and interest in voting is expected to be tepid. Maryland had to move its primary date earlier to comply with federal requirements designed to provide enough time to get general election absentee ballots to military personnel serving overseas, but the General Assembly could have moved the date back a matter of weeks rather than months.
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NEWS
By Michael Fletcher and Michael Fletcher,Staff Writer | March 1, 1992
State leaders of the NAACP said yesterday they plan to file suit challenging Maryland's new legislative redistricting plan, because it dilutes black voting power by packing blacks in several districts.The new plan creates nine majority black senatorial districts throughout Maryland. But NAACP officials say that as many as 12 majority black senatorial districts, plus a 13th comprised mostly of blacks, Hispanics and Asians, could be drawn in Maryland. Statewide, there are 47 senatorial districts and Maryland is about 25 percent black.
NEWS
November 18, 2013
State Sen. Joe Getty (R-5th District) is hosting a series of Meet and Greet events in state legislative District 5 - including in two in areas that are being added through the state's legislative redistricting. The informal sessions are to provide an opportunity to meet with residents and discuss the upcoming 2014 legislation session. Sessions in the newly added area of the district include Tuesday, Nov. 19, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Gunners Grille, 5525 Taneytown Pike, Taneytown; and Wednesday, Nov. 20, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Salerno's, 1043 Liberty Road, Eldersburg.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2002
Opponents of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's legislative redistricting plan vowed during a rally outside the State House yesterday to take their fight to Maryland's courts. "This will be decided, if not in hallways here, then in the courtroom down the street," said state Sen. Norman R. Stone Jr., a Baltimore County Democrat, as he pointed in the direction of Maryland's Court of Appeals. "There's no doubt it will go to the courtroom." The legislative redistricting plan -- required once a decade to reflect the latest national census data on population changes -- shifts two state Senate districts from the Baltimore region to the fast-growing Washington suburbs.
NEWS
November 18, 2013
State Sen. Joe Getty (R-5th District) is hosting a series of Meet and Greet events in state legislative District 5 - including in two in areas that are being added through the state's legislative redistricting. The informal sessions are to provide an opportunity to meet with residents and discuss the upcoming 2014 legislation session. Sessions in the newly added area of the district include Tuesday, Nov. 19, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Gunners Grille, 5525 Taneytown Pike, Taneytown; and Wednesday, Nov. 20, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Salerno's, 1043 Liberty Road, Eldersburg.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau Reporter Norris P. West contributed to this article | June 19, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- In a move that may be unprecedented in the nation, a panel of three federal judges hopes to sit jointly with the seven judges of Maryland's highest court to decide the constitutionality of Maryland's new legislative redistricting plan.The unusual level of cooperation, described in a June 15 opinion issued by the three federal judges, could result in a single court master being jointly appointed to hear legal challenges to the redistricting plan adopted by the General Assembly earlier this year.
NEWS
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | June 25, 1991
An article in Tuesday's editions of The Sun reported incorrectly that the Baltimore County Council is to produce a legislative redistricting proposal by July 1.The council is to produce a plan for council districts by that date. The General Assembly is to vote on a legislative redistricting plan during the first days of its session next January.The Sun regrets the error.Theresa Lowry said so many of her neighbors were spreading The Rumor over the weekend that she lost count of the number of telephone calls she received but guessed it was around 300.Walter Seymour said he first heard The Rumor when someone announced it from the pulpit of his church Sunday.
NEWS
May 2, 2014
One of the most cynical and self-serving actions taken by the General Assembly was moving the primary election from September to June Rather than try to stimulate greater voter turnout and public participation in the political process, the June date seeks to depress it. More families are on vacation in June, and interest in voting is expected to be tepid. Maryland had to move its primary date earlier to comply with federal requirements designed to provide enough time to get general election absentee ballots to military personnel serving overseas, but the General Assembly could have moved the date back a matter of weeks rather than months.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Sarah Koenig and David Nitkin and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2002
A DECISION by a circuit judge in Salem, Va., sent tremors through the Maryland State House last week. Judge Richard C. Pattisall ruled that Virginia's legislative redistricting map -- used to elect the 100 members of the House of Delegates last year -- was unconstitutional. He agreed with Democratic arguments that African-Americans were unfairly concentrated in a small number of districts, diluting their influence. Pattisall has ordered new delegate elections in the fall, tossing the commonwealth's political world into turmoil.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Maryland's highest court upheld Gov. Martin O'Malley's new legislative redistricting map on Friday morning. The Court of Appeals issued an order, but no opinion, denying the claims in three challenges. The order comes only two days after the challenges were argued in court. The order said the judges found the plan, which will take effect with the 2014 elections, passed constitutional muster. The new map shifts the districts of Baltimore County Democratic Sens. James Brochin – whose new district is majority Republican – and Delores Kelley, both of whom objected to the plan.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2002
Voters go to the polls today to select Democratic and Republican nominees for almost every elected office in Maryland, less than three months after the state's highest court scrambled the legislative redistricting process. The new map is forcing State House veterans to square off against one another in several unexpectedly competitive races and - depending on what voters decide today and in November - could lead to significant shake-ups in the leadership of the Maryland Senate and House of Delegates.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2002
In Dundalk, the proud and gritty waterfront enclave built on a century of steel and ships, voters are evaluating the two candidates for the Baltimore County Council more on their sense of hometown loyalty than on political issues that settle most elections. The race centers on a controversial legislative redistricting and lack of popularity of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Kathleen Kennedy Townsend. No Republicans have filed for the seat, so the Democratic primary Sept. 10 will decide who will represent Dundalk on the County Council.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Sarah Koenig and David Nitkin and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2002
A DECISION by a circuit judge in Salem, Va., sent tremors through the Maryland State House last week. Judge Richard C. Pattisall ruled that Virginia's legislative redistricting map -- used to elect the 100 members of the House of Delegates last year -- was unconstitutional. He agreed with Democratic arguments that African-Americans were unfairly concentrated in a small number of districts, diluting their influence. Pattisall has ordered new delegate elections in the fall, tossing the commonwealth's political world into turmoil.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2002
Opponents of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's legislative redistricting plan vowed during a rally outside the State House yesterday to take their fight to Maryland's courts. "This will be decided, if not in hallways here, then in the courtroom down the street," said state Sen. Norman R. Stone Jr., a Baltimore County Democrat, as he pointed in the direction of Maryland's Court of Appeals. "There's no doubt it will go to the courtroom." The legislative redistricting plan -- required once a decade to reflect the latest national census data on population changes -- shifts two state Senate districts from the Baltimore region to the fast-growing Washington suburbs.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Staff Writer | January 19, 1994
Last week's column noted that state Sen. Julian L. Lapides, effectively deprived of his political base through redistricting, might move to his mother-in-law's home in Mount Vernon. Actually, the home is in Mount Washington.For 31 years, half his life, Julian L. Lapides has roamed the corridors of power in Annapolis, an outsider among insiders, a man rarely invited to the table where the real decisions are made and the marching orders issued.With good reason. The Democratic senator from Bolton Hill has prospered in Annapolis because of wit, charm, intelligence and a talented proboscis.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | August 30, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Baltimore legislators hoping to retain as much clout as possible in the General Assembly once legislative redistricting is over got a bit of good news yesterday from Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr.In a legal opinion requested by state Sen. John A. Pica Jr., Mr. Curran concluded there could be justification for making the populations of legislative districts in Baltimore more than 10 percent smaller than the "ideal" legislative district of...
NEWS
October 28, 1991
If you thought the bloodletting over new congressional boundaries was messy, wait until officials in Annapolis start revamping Maryland's General Assembly districts. Self-preservation is foremost on the minds of most legislators but conflicting interests already are producing some testy showdowns (see editorial below).Unlike his secondary role in congressional map-making, Gov. William Donald Schaefer has the pivotal role in legislative redistricting. This is the governor's opportunity to exert maximum political leverage with members of the General Assembly.
NEWS
August 30, 1993
The Maryland Court of Appeals has struck a blow for metropolitan regionalism that will leave its mark on the political // map for decades. In upholding Gov. William Donald Schaefer's redistricting plan for the legislature, it has undermined the narrow parochialism that pits Baltimore City and Baltimore County against each other.Though there were a number of legal challenges to the reshuffling of legislative seats following the 1990 census, the most important and difficult issue dealt with the constitutional sanctity of county borders.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
Maryland's legislative redistricting plan is legal and should be allowed to stand, a special master appointed by the Court of Appeals said in his opinion released yesterday.The 34-page opinion, which rejects 10 objections to the plan, is not the final word. However, it does indicate how the Court of Appeals will handle the issue.Last year, Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the General Assembly adopted the plan over the protests of Baltimore and Montgomery County legislators, state Republicans and the NAACP.
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