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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Andrew A. Green and Liz Bowie and Andrew A. Green,SUN REPORTERS | December 12, 2007
Maryland's state school board defied warnings by legislative leaders and voted in private yesterday afternoon to renew schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick's contract for another four years. The decision, made after a three-hour executive session in Baltimore, immediately drew angry threats from legislative leaders in Annapolis, setting up the possibility of a long battle between the state board and the General Assembly over who will direct education policy. House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller had sent a letter to the board Monday urging it not to reappoint Grasmick.
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NEWS
Tim Wheeler | March 12, 2014
With a little over three weeks left in the General Assembly session this year, legislative leaders are scrambling to come up with a response to a potentially costly Court of Appeals ruling requiring legal representation for all criminal defendants during bail hearings. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said Wednesday that he and House Speaker Michael E. Busch had agreed to work together to try to avoid a legislative impasse on the issue. The state now provides attorneys only at hearings before judges.
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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer Staff writer John W. Frece contributed to this article | October 23, 1992
Legislative leaders say they have enough votes to pass a controversial plan to cut $147 million in state aid to local governments.The presiding officers said yesterday that they expect the Maryland General Assembly to meet in special session next month to approve the cut, which is a crucial piece of Gov. William Donald Schaefer's plan to eliminate a projected $450 million budget deficit.The proposal would shift the burden of paying Social Security taxes for teachers, librarians and community college employees from the state government to their actual employers -- the 23 counties and Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
The leaders of the Senate and House of Delegates predicted Thursday morning that lawmakers won't be repealing the stormwater fees in the state's largest jurisdictions this year. At a breakfast hosted by the Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Chamber of Commerce, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. responded to a question about whether the fees would be repealed by saying flatly: "We're not going to repeal the stormwater fee. " House Speaker Michael E. Busch then quickly piped up: "Second!"
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | March 28, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer began the day by calling for an end to "this war between the governor and the legislature," saying the ongoing dispute over the state budget would only hurt Maryland residents.But by the time the sun had gone down on the 78th day of the 90-day session, the fighting between Schaefer and the General Assembly had threatened to grow into an outright donnybrook, with some lawmakers suggesting that a legislative Armageddon is inevitable."His ability to deal with the legislature has never been worse," remarked Sen. Laurance Levitan, chairman of the powerful Budget and Taxation Committee and a frequent critic of the governor.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 15, 1997
ALBANY, N.Y. -- Politicians and tenant organizers mobilized yesterday as if for war, bracing for the possible expiration of state rent laws tonight.Left hanging in the balance was the status of millions of apartment dwellers.In a sign of mounting panic over the prospect that the laws could lapse, a phone line inaugurated yesterday by New York City Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani was inundated with calls from frightened tenants unsure of their rights.Gov. George E. Pataki instructed the attorney general's office and the state courts to prepare, if the rules expire, for the prosecution of landlords who harass tenants.
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | December 4, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Holy budget cut! Maryland's legislative leaders are all but eliminating future funds for prayer.It is not that they believe the General Assembly doesn't need prayer in these difficult times. It just don't want to pay for it anymore.Sessions of the Senate and House of Delegates have traditionally opened with prayer, usually delivered by a priest, rabbi or minister invited to the State House by a lawmaker representing his or her district.For their trouble, these men and women of the cloth were slipped a $40 stipend.
NEWS
June 23, 1991
Why are some General Assembly leaders so intent on picking a fight with Gov. William Donald Schaefer? Why are they so anxious to strip him of flexibility in dealing with the state's on-going fiscal crisis?These questions have emerged during negotiations between legislative leaders and members of the governor's staff. They are trying to iron out differences over a bill that would cut $125 million from the state budget in order to make the government's books balance before the fiscal year ends June 30. The General Assembly will meet on Wednesday in special session to approve the money-cutting bill.
NEWS
March 16, 2011
To the thousands of union members marching and complaining about the cuts to benefits of employees and retirees: Solve the problem — register and get out and vote. Get rid of the career politicians starting with the governor on down. Legislative leaders, senators and delegates. The easiest route for them in a budget crisis is to go after the state employees and retirees. Help all of us — vote them out. Gary Ewers, Kingsville
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | December 14, 1990
Gov. William Donald Schaefer, after meeting with legislative leaders, today announced there would be no layoffs of state workers in the near future."We now find that it is possible by melding the plan developed by the governor with certain portions of the plan developed by the [General Assembly] leadership to contain the 1991 shortfall without layoffs at this time," said a statement released this afternoon by Schaefer.Schaefer had proposed last week laying off as many as 1,800 state workers to reduce the state's $243 million budget deficit.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
Legislative leaders said Friday raising Maryland's minimum wage could involve boosting the rate statewide and letting prosperous counties increase it even further. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch told county officials gathered for a conference on the Eastern Shore they expected the legislature to consider raising the minimum wage. But, they said, it did not make sense for every jurisdiction to match rates set by counties where the cost of living is higher.
NEWS
May 16, 2012
They did what they had to do, and they went home. That's the best that can be said of the special session of the Maryland General Assembly that concluded today. The tax increases, spending cuts, fund transfers and other measures lawmakers approved in 21/2 days this week protect public education, health and public safety and put the state on a path to fiscal sustainability, all while requiring a relatively minimal additional contribution from taxpayers. After a chaotic end to the regular General Assembly session, order has been restored.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley and legislative leaders announced Wednesday an agreement to raise taxes on 16 percent of the state's earners and reverse a series of so-called "Doomsday" cuts the General Assembly enacted last month when a budget deal collapsed. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch, both Democrats, said they have lined up the votes to approve the plan, including the super-majority needed in the Senate to break any Republican filibuster attempt.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch joined Gov. Martin O'Malley Tuesday morning to discuss the terms under which the governor would call a special session to enact a tax increase and other measures to stave off more than $500 million in cuts to education and other programs. Miller and Busch, each accompanied by their chiefs of staff, arrived at Government House in Annapolis shortly after 8:30 a.m. to meet with the governor. The two legislative leaders are expected to try to work out a deal that would allow the General Assembly to return to Annapolis to quickly ratify an agreement on budget and tax issues.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley and top leaders of the General Assembly are considering the possibility of holding two special legislative sessions — one in May to deal with the state budget and another in summer to consider an expansion of casino gambling in Maryland. O'Malley disclosed the possible plan Tuesday in Baltimore, shortly after he met in Annapolis with Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch to discuss the prospect of calling senators and delegates back to the capital to raise taxes and avert about $500 million in cuts to popular programs.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Democratic lawmakers limped out of Annapolis Tuesday having enacted a "doomsday" budget that slashes spending for education and other services they do not want to cut — and with no clear plan on how to fix a political mess of their own making. House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller — whose clashes over gambling helped bring about a chaotic ending to the 2012 General Assembly session Monday night — agreed that a special session is needed to fix Maryland's budget.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1995
After a week of public criticism, the Glendening administration yesterday withdrew a controversial proposal to spend $1.5 million in taxpayer money to bail out a failing company owned by one of the governor's longtime political supporters.In a letter to legislative leaders, James T. Brady, the state's economic development secretary, said he was dropping the idea after advisers determined "that a grant to firms experiencing financial stress is not an appropriate use" of economic development funds.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1998
OCEAN CITY -- Transportation and taxation will be at the top of the General Assembly agenda next year regardless of who is elected governor, legislative leaders told the Maryland Chamber of Commerce yesterday.The Democratic and Republican leaders of the Senate and House of Delegates told business leaders that there is a broad agreement that the state's Transportation Trust Fund needs to be shored up -- but little consensus on how to do so. In particular, the legislators said, there is little political will to raise the state's gasoline tax -- the traditional source of money for transportation funds.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
The Maryland General Assembly's regular 90-day session ended in disarray Monday at midnight as legislators failed to approve an income tax measure to which their leaders had agreed. The lack of action meant that a so-called "doomsday" budget — balanced entirely through hundreds of millions of dollars of cuts — is in place for the fiscal year that begins July 1. House and Senate leaders said they would ask the governor to call a special session this week to allow them to take up a plan to increase income taxes to avoid the most severe cuts.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley joined legislative leaders Friday in saying they will take action this General Assembly session to make county governments live up to their responsibility to fund public schools at a minimum level required under state law. Seven county governments in Maryland are failing to fund their schools this year at the minimum per-pupil amount they did the year before, according to preliminary state numbers. O'Malley said it does not make sense for state taxpayers to be spending billions more for education in the past decade while some counties are "defunding" their schools.
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