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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 7, 2009
Sen. President Thomas V. Mike Miller lent his hefty political capital yesterday to a cause he has long opposed: public campaign financing. Proponents of the plan "beat me down," Miller, a Democrat who represents Calvert and Prince George's counties, told reporters as he announced his support of legislation that would make Maryland among the handful of states that offer public money to candidates for the legislature. He also said he decided to support a plan that will now work its way through the Assembly in the final five weeks of the legislative session in part because of how much last year's federal campaigns cost.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 7, 2009
Sen. President Thomas V. Mike Miller lent his hefty political capital yesterday to a cause he has long opposed: public campaign financing. Proponents of the plan "beat me down," Miller, a Democrat who represents Calvert and Prince George's counties, told reporters as he announced his support of legislation that would make Maryland among the handful of states that offer public money to candidates for the legislature. He also said he decided to support a plan that will now work its way through the Assembly in the final five weeks of the legislative session in part because of how much last year's federal campaigns cost.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | August 7, 1994
The candidates for Baltimore County executive vastly outnumbered the two audience members at a forum last month at Middleborough Elementary School in Middle River, so the event was canceled.Another forum for executive candidates scheduled for Tuesday night at Goucher College by the Towson Development Corp. was canceled.Wayne Skinner, director of the private business development organization, said hundreds of letters were mailed, but only 24 people indicated they likely would attend.Other forums held around Baltimore County this summer have drawn only small numbers of residents, usually fewer than 50 a session, a far cry from 1990 when voters aroused about rising property tax assessments, traffic congestion and government spending seemed much more interested.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun Reporter | November 9, 2006
While Ehrlich and the legislature wrangled over how to expand health coverage, the number of uninsured in the state rose from 547,000 in 2000 to 788,000 in the latest census bureau estimates. Now, advocates for expanded coverage say they expect the new administration will bring fresh action to provide more health coverage. "It's a new dawn for health care reform efforts in our state," said Glenn E. Schneider, executive director of Maryland Citizens' Health Initiative, a group seeking universal health coverage.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1997
Lawyers for the state filed a rebuttal yesterday in Baltimore federal court to a lawsuit by anti-abortion advocates seeking to overturn Maryland's law prohibiting lobbyists from raising campaign funds for legislative candidates.Two officials with the Maryland Right to Life State Political Action Committee filed the suit in U.S. District Court in February, alleging that the restrictions on lobbyists infringe on their constitutional right to raise political funds for the candidates of their choice.
NEWS
February 6, 2004
POLITICAL REFORMERS in Iran are heading for a showdown with the conservative clerics who rule the Islamic state. A third of the 290-member parliament took the bold step of resigning this week and refusing to participate in the Feb. 20 elections. Although courageous, theirs is an uphill fight against a group of autocratic hard-liners who have commandeered the electoral process. In a bid to ameliorate the crisis, Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, ordered an independent review of thousands of legislative candidates who were barred from running for office.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer | October 5, 1994
In an unusual display of party unity, nearly a hundred Republican candidates for the state legislature joined gubernatorial nominee Ellen R. Sauerbrey in Annapolis yesterday to pledge allegiance to the gospel of tax cuts and fiscal conservatism.Mrs. Sauerbrey and 96 legislative candidates signed a five-point "contract with Maryland" that would cut income taxes, require a two-thirds vote of the legislature to raise taxes and shift construction spending from so-called "pork" projects to schools and prisons.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2002
A coalition of groups seeking expanded health coverage for Maryland's poor called on gubernatorial and legislative candidates yesterday to back a 36-cent cigarette tax increase and to stop the sale of the state's largest nonprofit insurer. The three-point pledge being sent out this week by the Maryland Citizens' Health Initiative also asks candidates to support having the state negotiate with drug manufacturers to secure lower prices on medicine for senior citizens and others who lack prescription coverage.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2001
MARILYN E. CANAVAN brought some Yankee common sense, not to mention a lovely Maine accent, to the House Commerce and Government Matters Committee in Annapolis last week. A Democratic state representative from Waterville, Maine, Canavan urged the committee to follow the lead of Maine and six other states and allow taxpayer money to be used to pay for legislative political campaigns. "There's not a plan devised that takes money out of politics, but this comes as close as any I can see," Canavan said, referring to a bill sponsored by Del. John A. Hurson, a Montgomery Democrat and the House majority leader.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun Reporter | November 9, 2006
While Ehrlich and the legislature wrangled over how to expand health coverage, the number of uninsured in the state rose from 547,000 in 2000 to 788,000 in the latest census bureau estimates. Now, advocates for expanded coverage say they expect the new administration will bring fresh action to provide more health coverage. "It's a new dawn for health care reform efforts in our state," said Glenn E. Schneider, executive director of Maryland Citizens' Health Initiative, a group seeking universal health coverage.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | November 3, 2006
Keith Losoya is doing the unthinkable, running for a state Senate seat in the bluest of blue cities. Baltimore City, after all, has more than eight Democrats for every registered Republican. Not good odds for a non-Democrat. So it comes as no surprise that the city's 24 Democratic legislative candidates - mostly incumbents - are expected to win the city's six legislative districts. Most have practically quit campaigning after more competitive primary elections in September. One senator and three delegates represent each district.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | January 19, 2006
A get-tough policy toward sex offenders not only tops the General Assembly's agenda this year, but it has also emerged as a major campaign issue in the race for governor, with Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. unveiling plans on the issue. Lawmakers today are scheduled to launch a debate over the future of Maryland's laws punishing sex offenders. And with political heavyweights -- including the state attorney general -- pushing strikingly similar legislation, it is likely that some variation of a more stringent monitoring of child sex offenders will be adopted by the time lawmakers adjourn in April.
NEWS
By LIANNE HART and LIANNE HART,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 23, 2005
AUSTIN, TEXAS -- A judge heard arguments yesterday over whether the money-laundering and conspiracy case against Rep. Tom DeLay, a Texas Republican, should be dismissed - with the defense asserting that the charges are flawed and the prosecution arguing that the powerful lawmaker should be held accountable for circumventing election laws. DeLay is charged with illegally funneling corporate campaign contributions to Republican candidates in Texas' 2002 legislative races. He appeared in court with his wife at his side but did not make any statements.
NEWS
February 6, 2004
POLITICAL REFORMERS in Iran are heading for a showdown with the conservative clerics who rule the Islamic state. A third of the 290-member parliament took the bold step of resigning this week and refusing to participate in the Feb. 20 elections. Although courageous, theirs is an uphill fight against a group of autocratic hard-liners who have commandeered the electoral process. In a bid to ameliorate the crisis, Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, ordered an independent review of thousands of legislative candidates who were barred from running for office.
NEWS
July 12, 2002
Here is a list of legislative candidates who have filed in Anne Arundel County: State Senate District 21:Arthur Dorman (D); John A. Giannetti Jr. (D) District 30:John C. Astle (D); Nora Criss-McIntire Keenan (R); Andy Smarick (R) District 31:Philip C. Jimeno (D) District 32:James E. DeGrange Sr. (D); Terry R. Gilleland Jr. (R) District 33:Robert R. Neall (D); Janet Greenip (R) House of Delegates District 21: Angie Como (D); Barbara A. Frush (D); Christopher P. Keene (D); Pauline H. Menes (D)
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2002
A coalition of groups seeking expanded health coverage for Maryland's poor called on gubernatorial and legislative candidates yesterday to back a 36-cent cigarette tax increase and to stop the sale of the state's largest nonprofit insurer. The three-point pledge being sent out this week by the Maryland Citizens' Health Initiative also asks candidates to support having the state negotiate with drug manufacturers to secure lower prices on medicine for senior citizens and others who lack prescription coverage.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer | October 5, 1994
We're three weeks into the general election campaign and the two gubernatorial candidates still have not had a face-to-face exchange.Don't blame Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey. Slightly behind in the polls and constrained in her spending by public financing laws, Mrs. Sauerbrey is eager to do battle with Democrat Parris N. Glendening.But the Prince George's County executive has played hard to get.He turned down WBAL-TV, which wanted the two candidates to appear together on an interview program.
NEWS
By LIANNE HART and LIANNE HART,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 23, 2005
AUSTIN, TEXAS -- A judge heard arguments yesterday over whether the money-laundering and conspiracy case against Rep. Tom DeLay, a Texas Republican, should be dismissed - with the defense asserting that the charges are flawed and the prosecution arguing that the powerful lawmaker should be held accountable for circumventing election laws. DeLay is charged with illegally funneling corporate campaign contributions to Republican candidates in Texas' 2002 legislative races. He appeared in court with his wife at his side but did not make any statements.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2001
MARILYN E. CANAVAN brought some Yankee common sense, not to mention a lovely Maine accent, to the House Commerce and Government Matters Committee in Annapolis last week. A Democratic state representative from Waterville, Maine, Canavan urged the committee to follow the lead of Maine and six other states and allow taxpayer money to be used to pay for legislative political campaigns. "There's not a plan devised that takes money out of politics, but this comes as close as any I can see," Canavan said, referring to a bill sponsored by Del. John A. Hurson, a Montgomery Democrat and the House majority leader.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1999
WHILE THE MARYLAND political world has focused on the aggressive early fund-raising by potential gubernatorial candidates in 2002, Gov. Parris N. Glendening has also been busy.Although barred from running for re-election, the governor has raised $400,000 this year, money he has said he needs to keep his political options open and advance his "progressive" agenda.So who would give to a lame-duck governor?Lots of people, it turns out, nearly all of them with a manifest reason for doing so.As is often the case in Maryland Democratic politics, the list begins with Baltimore attorney Peter G. Angelos, majority owner of the Orioles.
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