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Legionnaires Disease

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By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | August 24, 2007
An employee of the William Donald Schaefer Tower downtown was stricken with Legionnaires' disease, and several others with respiratory illnesses are being examined, but state officials were cautioning yesterday that they don't believe the building is contaminated. "Right now, what we have is one case," Gov. Martin O'Malley told reporters yesterday at a news conference inside the building. "If there were a second case in this building, that would tell us we have to go into a much deeper level of forensic examination."
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Two people who stayed at an Econo Lodge in northern Ocean City this summer have tested positive for Legionnaires' disease and low levels of Legionella bacteria were found in the hotel's water pipes, Worcester County health officials said. Health officials zeroed in on the 145th Street hotel after a second person who stayed there tested positive for the infection Aug. 28, said Kathleen Derr, nursing program manager for communicable disease for the county health department. The other person became ill earlier in the summer, she said.
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NEWS
July 15, 1999
PEOPLE sometimes can catch diseases in hospitals. It appears that at least five people, three of whom died, may have contracted Legionnaires' disease at Harford Memorial Hospital. At least one family believes hospital officials were not forthcoming about the source of their relative's fatal disease.Outbreaks of the disease, caused by the Legionella bacterium, are more common than generally recognized. The bacteria grow in water and are present in water systems, air conditioners and whirlpools.
HEALTH
By Jessica Anderson and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Two cases of Legionnaires' disease have been confirmed at a senior housing complex in East Baltimore, city health officials said Friday. A pair of residents at the 149-unit Apostolic Towers Apartments at 201 N. Washington St. tested positive for the bacteria that cause Legionnaires', city health officials said. One case occurred in March and the other this week; the residents were hospitalized. One person remains in the hospital with pneumonia. Health officials said two cases are considered a "cluster," leading them to test the water system in the building and warn residents not to shower or use the tap. Bottled water has been provided for drinking and cooking.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2003
A patient at Villa St. Michael Nursing Home in Northwest Baltimore has been diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease and state and city officials are conducting tests to determine if the Legionella bacteria are in the facility's hot-water system. J.B Hansen, a spokesman for the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, said test samples were taken at the 200-bed nursing home this week and that results are expected late next week. Hansen said a patient at Villa St. Michael, whom he declined to identify but described as a woman in her 80s, was recently found to have Legionnaires' disease and is undergoing treatment at a local hospital.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1999
The Baltimore County health director warned county and state employees at a Towson office building yesterday to watch for symptoms of Legionnaires' disease after a Health Department staffer contracted the disease.In a memo from Dr. Michelle A. Leverett, about 700 county and state employees were notified that Legionnaires' disease, which could be spread through a building's water and ventilation systems, has been diagnosed in a worker in the Investment Building.An environmental consultant will test the drinking water and the ventilation system in the 13-story building off York Road, said an attorney for the building's owner, A.M.G.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1999
Havre de Grace rests like a jewel on the shores of the Susquehanna River, a town of 12,000 where antiques shops and an ice cream parlor share space with restaurants. It is not unusual to spot a neighbor biking down to the marina to walk the wooden promenade or feed the ducks.At the heart of the town is Harford Memorial Hospital, an 85-year-old institution in a quiet, tree-lined neighborhood."It's a community hospital," Havre de Grace City Manager Mary Ann Lisanti said of the hospital, the town's largest employer and one of the largest in Harford County.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2001
A Baltimore Circuit Court employee has contracted Legionnaires' disease, the second courthouse worker since October to catch the respiratory illness, which is spread by contaminated air conditioning and other air-circulation systems. The employee, who was not identified, has recovered and is expected back at work soon, Administrative Judge Ellen M. Heller said. Both Legionnaires' patients worked at Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse, built in 1900 and equipped with what courthouse workers called a "byzantine" ventilation system.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1999
The bacteria that causes Legionnaires' disease was found in the water systems of a Towson office building where hundreds of state and county employees work, but the organism is probably no longer there, building managers and Baltimore County health officials said yesterday.Testers from Clayton Environmental Consultants of Novi, Mich., took water samples in the 13-story Investment Building, off York Road in central Towson. The building's water systems were disinfected earlier this month, after an unidentified woman who works there was diagnosed with the disease.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Dennis O'Brien contributed to this article | October 7, 1998
One worker at a Southeast Baltimore plant has died of suspected Legionnaires' disease and eight others have developed possibly related respiratory illnesses, forcing the company to shut down more than a third of its plant while the state health department investigates the outbreak.Poly-Seal Corp., a maker of plastic caps and seals, has laid off about 250 workers -- roughly half its work force -- while the plant is partly closed during the investigation.It could take a "couple of weeks" for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to investigate, health and company officials said yesterday at a news conference at the plant in the Holabird Industrial Park.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
An inmate at a Western Maryland state prison tested positive for the bacterium that causes Legionnaires' disease, prompting an investigation of the facility's water and air-conditioning systems, corrections officials said Friday. The inmate, a man in his 40s, had been sent from Roxbury Correctional Institution in Hagerstown to Bon Secours Hospital in Baltimore, where he was found to be carrying legionella bacteria. The bacteria are found in warm water and can cause Legionnaires' disease, marked by a cough, high fever, muscle aches and headache.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
Baltimore city health officials have confirmed two cases of legionnaires disease at a Hampden nursing home. The two people diagnosed with the disease at the Keswick Multi-Care Center on West 40th Street began showing symptoms in September but are recovering, according to Brian Schleter, a spokesman with the Baltimore Health Department. The center is taking precautions by serving only bottled water while an investigation is under way. Legionnaires is caused by a bacterium called legionella.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2011
State health officials confirmed Wednesday the presence of Legionella bacteria in the water at Plim Plaza Hotel in Ocean City . Officials have also announced three new cases of Legionnaire's disease among hotel guests, in addition to the three cases announced last week. One elderly out-of-state resident has died. The bacteria was found in several water samples taken from the hotel, which is closed for the season, according to officials from the Worcester County Health Department and the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, who have been investigating.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2010
"Big" Max Taylor Jr. barely survived the Legionnaire's disease he contracted last year while living at a Baltimore retirement community for low-income seniors, but he's not sure his current existence quite qualifies as living. His speech is slurred, his balance is off, and he uses a walker to get from place to place — effects of the stroke he says was brought on by the Legionnaire's. He's had to move from Baltimore, where he was born and raised, to Charlotte, N.C., so his grown son, "Little" Max Taylor III, can tend to his basic needs.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | October 24, 2009
Workers began disinfecting the water at Stadium Place on Friday while officials wait to learn whether the apartment complex was the source of the Legionnaire's disease that has killed one elderly resident and sickened five others. Specialists from Legionella Risk Management added chlorine dioxide, a chemical used in treatment systems, to the water supply at the senior facility on the former site of Memorial Stadium, and 10 two-person teams swept through individual apartments to flush out water pipes and raise the temperature on water heaters.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | October 17, 2009
City and state health officials reassured an anxious, standing-room-only crowd of elderly residents of Stadium Place on Friday that the Legionnaires' disease that killed one of their number and sickened four others cannot be spread from person to person. Residents of the senior housing community on the former site of Memorial Stadium peppered officials with dozens of questions - many focused on how they could protect themselves from contracting the sometimes-fatal form of pneumonia and whether authorities had responded quickly enough to the outbreak.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1998
As health officials identified a fourth case of Legionnaires' disease yesterday among employees of a Southeast Baltimore plastics plant, Poly-Seal Corp. announced it will close the factory this morning to disinfect its water systems.The factory's five water systems will be flushed with very hot water and high concentrations of chlorine to make certain that no Legionella pneumophila bacteria remain, said Levi Rabinowitz, a media consultant hired by Poly-Seal to speak for the company.Waterchem, an Aberdeen company that maintains the plant's water systems, will coordinate the cleanup.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
City and state officials are scrambling for clues to what caused an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease at a senior living facility on the former site of Memorial Stadium, leaving one person dead and four others sickened. Officials at the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and the Baltimore Health Department were interviewing those who have fallen ill and planning to test water sources to try to determine the origin of the outbreak at Stadium Place, a retirement community built 10 years ago. Authorities also were informing residents about symptoms so any new cases can be caught early.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | July 9, 2008
The building where Johns Hopkins Hospital cares for its transplant patients is on water restrictions this week after routine tests of the water system on July 2 turned up evidence of the bacterium that causes Legionnaires' disease. A hospital spokesman said no patients or employees have been infected by the organism, which can cause a lung infection fatal in 5 percent to 30 percent of cases. "No one is sick. Nor has anyone at the hospital been identified, either patient or staff, as having picked up a Legionella infection," said Hopkins spokesman David March.
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