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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2010
"Big" Max Taylor Jr. barely survived the Legionnaire's disease he contracted last year while living at a Baltimore retirement community for low-income seniors, but he's not sure his current existence quite qualifies as living. His speech is slurred, his balance is off, and he uses a walker to get from place to place — effects of the stroke he says was brought on by the Legionnaire's. He's had to move from Baltimore, where he was born and raised, to Charlotte, N.C., so his grown son, "Little" Max Taylor III, can tend to his basic needs.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Two people who stayed at an Econo Lodge in northern Ocean City this summer have tested positive for Legionnaires' disease and low levels of Legionella bacteria were found in the hotel's water pipes, Worcester County health officials said. Health officials zeroed in on the 145th Street hotel after a second person who stayed there tested positive for the infection Aug. 28, said Kathleen Derr, nursing program manager for communicable disease for the county health department. The other person became ill earlier in the summer, she said.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2011
State health officials confirmed Wednesday the presence of Legionella bacteria in the water at Plim Plaza Hotel in Ocean City . Officials have also announced three new cases of Legionnaire's disease among hotel guests, in addition to the three cases announced last week. One elderly out-of-state resident has died. The bacteria was found in several water samples taken from the hotel, which is closed for the season, according to officials from the Worcester County Health Department and the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, who have been investigating.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Water restrictions remain in place at the Hanover Square Apartments in Otterbein, where one resident was diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease in mid-July, according to the city's Health Department. The July 18 case is the only one associated with the 1 West Conway Street tower, where the city is monitoring efforts to test and clear the water, said Health Department spokesman Michael Schwartzberg. He said he did not have more information about the patient's status. Legionnaires' disease, a type of pneumonia, spreads through the inhalation of tiny droplets of contaminated water.
NEWS
By Diana Sugg and Lisa Respers and Diana Sugg and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1999
Even as officials at Harford Memorial Hospital sought to identify new cases of Legionnaire's disease, experts say outbreaks of the infection are far more common nationwide than many people believe and could be controlled."
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2000
Putting Maryland at the forefront nationwide in dealing with Legionnaire's disease, state health officials are calling on hospitals to step up their monitoring and prevention efforts. A task force report released yesterday recommends that hospitals routinely test their water systems for the legionella bacteria, that doctors have quick access to diagnostic tests, and that hospitals set up Legionnaire's teams. The state health secretary, Dr. Georges Benjamin, appointed the task force last summer, after a series of Baltimore-area cases.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1975: FBI catches Patty Hearst 1976: U.S. bicentennial 1976: Zedong, Zhou Enlai die 1976: Legionnaire's disease kills 29 Pub Date: 12/08/99
NEWS
October 8, 1998
A front-page article yesterday incorrectly reported the date Poly-Seal Corp. alerted health authorities to an outbreak of Legionnaire's disease among its employees. The company contacted health officials Friday after learning that an employee had died and others appeared to have similar illnesses.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 10/08/98
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | April 13, 1993
The Baltimore Teachers Union hints at a cover-up.City school officials suspect a smear job by the union.Caught in the political cross fire is a teacher at Sarah M. Roach Elementary School who is recovering from a possible case of Legionnaire's disease, a potentially deadly form of pneumonia.Her illness, and the school department's response, has produced the latest clash between BTU and education officials over Baltimore's controversial experiment in school privatization, known as Tesseract.
NEWS
October 23, 2009
Sixth case of Legionnaire's diagnosed at Stadium Place The Baltimore Health Department reported Thursday that a sixth resident of the senior living facility Stadium Place has been diagnosed with Legionnaire's disease since the outbreak began in early October. One resident has died, but the conditions of the others are unknown. City officials, along with the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, continue to look for the source of the problem.
HEALTH
By Jessica Anderson and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Two cases of Legionnaires' disease have been confirmed at a senior housing complex in East Baltimore, city health officials said Friday. A pair of residents at the 149-unit Apostolic Towers Apartments at 201 N. Washington St. tested positive for the bacteria that cause Legionnaires', city health officials said. One case occurred in March and the other this week; the residents were hospitalized. One person remains in the hospital with pneumonia. Health officials said two cases are considered a "cluster," leading them to test the water system in the building and warn residents not to shower or use the tap. Bottled water has been provided for drinking and cooking.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
An inmate at a Western Maryland state prison tested positive for the bacterium that causes Legionnaires' disease, prompting an investigation of the facility's water and air-conditioning systems, corrections officials said Friday. The inmate, a man in his 40s, had been sent from Roxbury Correctional Institution in Hagerstown to Bon Secours Hospital in Baltimore, where he was found to be carrying legionella bacteria. The bacteria are found in warm water and can cause Legionnaires' disease, marked by a cough, high fever, muscle aches and headache.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
Baltimore city health officials have confirmed two cases of legionnaires disease at a Hampden nursing home. The two people diagnosed with the disease at the Keswick Multi-Care Center on West 40th Street began showing symptoms in September but are recovering, according to Brian Schleter, a spokesman with the Baltimore Health Department. The center is taking precautions by serving only bottled water while an investigation is under way. Legionnaires is caused by a bacterium called legionella.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2011
State health officials confirmed Wednesday the presence of Legionella bacteria in the water at Plim Plaza Hotel in Ocean City . Officials have also announced three new cases of Legionnaire's disease among hotel guests, in addition to the three cases announced last week. One elderly out-of-state resident has died. The bacteria was found in several water samples taken from the hotel, which is closed for the season, according to officials from the Worcester County Health Department and the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, who have been investigating.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2010
"Big" Max Taylor Jr. barely survived the Legionnaire's disease he contracted last year while living at a Baltimore retirement community for low-income seniors, but he's not sure his current existence quite qualifies as living. His speech is slurred, his balance is off, and he uses a walker to get from place to place — effects of the stroke he says was brought on by the Legionnaire's. He's had to move from Baltimore, where he was born and raised, to Charlotte, N.C., so his grown son, "Little" Max Taylor III, can tend to his basic needs.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | October 24, 2009
Workers began disinfecting the water at Stadium Place on Friday while officials wait to learn whether the apartment complex was the source of the Legionnaire's disease that has killed one elderly resident and sickened five others. Specialists from Legionella Risk Management added chlorine dioxide, a chemical used in treatment systems, to the water supply at the senior facility on the former site of Memorial Stadium, and 10 two-person teams swept through individual apartments to flush out water pipes and raise the temperature on water heaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 11, 1991
'Lionheart'Starring Jean-Claude Van Damme.Directed by Sheldon Lettich.Released by Universal.Rated R.* "Lionheart" is a movie so primitive it appears to have been discovered on the floor of a recently excavated cave. Can it predate the discovery of photography?It certainly predates the discovery of drama.Jean-Claude Van Damme,the jaunty Belgian kickboxer, plays a French Foreign Legionnaire (now how long has it been since you've seen one of those in a movie?) who deserts his post in North Africa, flees to L.A. via New York and the Atlantic (no, he doesn't swim it, though the movie is so dumb I'm surprised he doesn't)
NEWS
By From staff reports | August 19, 1999
In Baltimore CountyBank to open branch in a neglected block of Eastern BoulevardESSEX -- As part of the revitalization of the Essex business district, Baltimore County Savings Bank officials plan to open a branch office in the once nearly vacant 500 block of Eastern Blvd.The branch will feature a 24-hour automated teller machine and a two-lane drive-through facility, said David M. Meadows, the bank general counsel. The office will open in the fall.The long-neglected block was purchased by local investors in June for about $1 million.
NEWS
October 23, 2009
Sixth case of Legionnaire's diagnosed at Stadium Place The Baltimore Health Department reported Thursday that a sixth resident of the senior living facility Stadium Place has been diagnosed with Legionnaire's disease since the outbreak began in early October. One resident has died, but the conditions of the others are unknown. City officials, along with the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, continue to look for the source of the problem.
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