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Legalized Gambling

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NEWS
July 27, 1996
IS MAYOR Kurt L. Schmoke so desperate to avoid accountability that he is willing to sell the city's soul for a bowl of empty promises? In advance of his meeting with Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday to discuss a city-state schools partnership, Mr. Schmoke floated an astonishing idea -- legalizing gambling in Baltimore and channeling some of the profits into the city's troubled schools.This is a terrible proposition, and the governor deserves credit for making that clear. For one thing, gambling revenues are not stable and predictable.
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NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 28, 2014
Playing poker or bridge at home with cash stakes would become legal under a bill approved this week by the Senate. Though rarely enforced, it is a misdemeanor in Maryland for individuals to gamble, even in the privacy of their own homes. Sen. Nancy J. King, a Montgomery County Democrat and the bill's chief sponsor, called it a "common sense" bill that would allow family and friends to play games at home without fear of arrest or prosecution. Under the bill passed unanimously on Thursday, wagering may not be done over the Internet, and game hosts may not receive any compensation beyond whatever they might win.
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NEWS
October 5, 1995
CAMBRIDGE -- With a casino company already interested in this Eastern Shore city, the mayor convened a task force yesterday to study the pros and cons of legalized gambling.Mayor David J. Wooten Jr. said he is "adamantly opposed" to casinos, but wants to hear from a broad cross-section of city residents. "I see [casinos] as something that could alter the landscape of the city and county for a generation," he said. "I want to have as many facts as we can."Officials of Harveys Casino Resorts have told Cambridge officials they want to build a dockside casino and hotel on the Choptank River off U.S. 50.
NEWS
December 18, 2013
As the owner of a small business that produces events in Baltimore, I have been pleased to see the continued growth of entertainment and cultural options in Baltimore City. However, I have mixed emotions about the large casino taking shape on Russell Street. Owning a business is a form of legalized gambling. As a business owner I appreciate the freedom of choice to take chances. On a personal level, we all have choices involving risk. We can climb mountains in Colorado or take hikes in a state parks.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Concerned about the explosion of gambling nationwide, Congress yesterday began exploring the need for federal oversight of an industry that is now under the strict control of the states.Rep. Frank R. Wolf, a Virginia Republican, urged the House Judiciary Committee to create a national commission to study gambling and the problems that often accompany it, such as compulsive gambling and increased white-collar crime."It does not tax gambling. It does not regulate gambling," Mr. Wolf said of his proposal.
NEWS
February 10, 1991
Four years ago, we warned that if Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the General Assembly permitted the return of slot machines to eight Eastern Shore counties that other counties would seek similar approval. Legalized gambling devices would spread haphazardly with little supervision or strict accounting for the tens of millions of dollars sure to be poured into these one-armed bandits.Now it is happening. Legislators from three counties -- Harford, Baltimore and Worcester -- are seeking to legalize slot machines in their jurisdictions, all making the came claims: the gambling devices would be allowed only in fraternal and non-profit service organization buildings; only five slots would be permitted per organization, and it would raise oodles of money for these groups to use for charitable and community good deeds.
NEWS
December 15, 1990
Anyone opposing the extension of legalized gambling throughout Maryland had better step aside: a united horse-racing industry has revved up its locomotive and is about to ram through an off-track betting bill in Annapolis.Racing officials have plenty of help, too -- from Gov. William Donald Schaefer, from licensing secretary William Fogle and from the compliant Maryland Racing Commission. All of them think OTB is a fabulous idea.We beg to differ. This plan is a thinly veiled attempt to open up Maryland to legalized gambling.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | August 30, 1995
Casinos will come to Maryland, and communities should prepare themselves, an economist told told county business leaders yesterday."It's not an if issue; it's a when issue," said Donald E. Hunter, president of Hunter Interests Inc., an Annapolis consulting business. "If I were a betting man, [casinos] are going to happen."Mr. Hunter spoke before about 30 business and community leaders at Anne Arundel Community College in a talk sponsored by the Anne Arundel Trade Council. His company has studied casino gambling in 16 states and is writing a report for the Greater Baltimore Committee.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2003
After eight years of study, the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development has completed a review of whether the Piscataway Conoy Confederacy and Sub-Tribes should be formally recognized as an Indian tribe by the state. The recommendation - not made public - was sent yesterday to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. for the final decision. Yesterday's recommendation was a secret even to the Southern Maryland confederacy, which claims as many as 3,500 members. The group filed its request for recognition during former Gov. Parris N. Glendening's first year in office in 1995, but the issue never made it as far as his desk.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1998
Striking back at Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who endorsed one of his opponents, Gov. Parris N. Glendening said in Baltimore last night that no political endorsement is worth bringing more legalized gambling to Maryland."
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2003
After eight years of study, the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development has completed a review of whether the Piscataway Conoy Confederacy and Sub-Tribes should be formally recognized as an Indian tribe by the state. The recommendation - not made public - was sent yesterday to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. for the final decision. Yesterday's recommendation was a secret even to the Southern Maryland confederacy, which claims as many as 3,500 members. The group filed its request for recognition during former Gov. Parris N. Glendening's first year in office in 1995, but the issue never made it as far as his desk.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Ivan Penn and Michael Dresser and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2003
African-American lawmakers are considering a push for legalizing gambling at locations other than the racetracks where Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. wants to install slot machines, legislators said yesterday. The lawmakers want to ensure that African-Americans, whose communities would play host to many of the new slot machines under a plan favored by Ehrlich, will share the wealth generated from legalized gambling, prominent black lawmakers said. Meanwhile, one of the state's most powerful African-American lawmakers questioned yesterday whether the racetracks should receive any share of the profits from slots other than enough to cover their costs because of the benefits they'll gain from increased purses.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 8, 2003
IF WE'RE going to legalize slot machines in Maryland -- and I'll bet you my Aunt Sadie's lovely rococo mirror we are -- then why are we getting a lot of sticky-fingered middlemen involved? I strongly dislike the middleman. Every American does. The middleman costs us money. Most people spend their lives trying to get rid of him. All the time you hear people talking like Tony Soprano about whacking the guy: "Let's eliminate the middleman." So, you got my drift. In the case of slot machines, the middlemen are the guys in nice suits circling over Maryland right now, looking to dive down and snatch an exclusive piece of the action.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 6, 2002
DEL. HOWARD "Pete" Rawlings finds himself caught between the false piety and the empty politics surrounding legalized gambling. The politics are Thomas V. Mike Miller's, the piety Parris Glendening's. The likely result is the state of Maryland taking another financial bath. When the General Assembly convenes this week, Rawlings will launch a bid to let voters decide the future of slot machines in Maryland. Miller, the Senate president, thinks this is bad for Democrats seeking re-election.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | March 11, 2001
"Did we give a lot of information about every team? Yes. But, if you're gonna bet on college basketball, you don't need TV. People are gonna bet on cockroaches." -- ESPN anchor Bob Ley, fall 1999 Every March, millions of citizens who don't know if Gonzaga is a college or a cheese decide to bet college hoops. Suddenly, in workplaces across the country, basketball pools are as common as coffee, everyone picking winners 32 games out, putting a few bucks on their picks. It's March Madness, the NCAA tournament, a national spring festival, more plays than the Super Bowl.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 1, 2000
COLUMBIA, S.C. - Last year, the churches and businesses of South Carolina rose up as one to help drive the electric jangle of video poker from the state. But now, as pastors work to rouse their congregations against a proposed state lottery on the November ballot, they are finding a bit less sympathy in the pews and the state's corporate offices. Disdain for the idea of state-run gambling is plentiful in this deeply religious state, particularly in the Piedmont region in the northwest.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 24, 1998
There might be some logic to the latest Larry Thing -- the decision by the mayor of Baltimore to endorse the Harford County executive in her bid to unseat the sitting Democratic governor of Maryland in the September primary. It's Larry Gibson's doing, mainly, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's brilliant. In fact, in this case, personal feelings might have clouded the usually clear thinking of the state's premier political strategist. (Sounds like the stuff of operetta, eh? I'll have to get to work on one. Working title: "Il Cosa Lorenzo," or "The Larry Thing."
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | January 9, 2000
NEW ORLEANS -- "Fast Eddie" has always been a fitting nickname for Edwin Edwards. The smooth-talking, lady-killing, four-term former governor of Louisiana, has walked -- no, strutted -- out of two federal racketeering trials a free man. Tomorrow in a federal court in Baton Rouge, he will go on trial again, this time with his son Stephen and four co-defendants. They are charged with extorting money from the state's casinos and tampering with the licensing process. Edwards faces 28 counts.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 5, 1998
ON TUESDAY, which was Election Day in East Baltimore and the lesser parts of America, here was one of those moments capturing so much that we treasure in a democracy but which, for reasons unknown, seldom finds expression in the great textbooks of our schools."
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