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NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 2, 2002
LONDON -- A question facing Britain's Parliament is this: Should a man who stood trial before his peers 20 years ago -- and was judged innocent -- be forced to stand trial again if new evidence such as DNA indicates that he committed the crime? The answer by Parliament, if it goes along with the government of Prime Minister Tony Blair, is likely to be, yes -- try the man again. The proposed change in the double-jeopardy law, which now prevents defendants from being tried for the same crime twice, is one element in a sweeping package proposed by Blair's government.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2002
In a crowded room, nobody notices a man being knifed to death. Doors that are supposed to be locked are not. And it's hard to say who is less attractive - the accused killer, the victim or the witnesses. But that is the reality of prison murder cases. Those challenges were on display last month when an Anne Arundel County jury stunned prosecutors by acquitting a convicted murderer of the stabbing death of a fellow inmate. "We put on everything that we had," said Assistant State's Attorney Frederick M. Paone, who was seeking the death penalty against John Ashby, an inmate at the Maryland House of Correction Annex in Jessup.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2002
As his mother looked on, Wesley Eugene Baker's supporters rallied yesterday to protest his impending execution, waving signs and listening to a half-dozen speakers call for an end to a death penalty that they consider racist and unfair. "The death penalty's immoral, it's barbaric and it doesn't even hold up to scrutiny in terms of doing what it is supposed to do as a deterrent," Michael Stark, a spokesman for the Campaign to End the Death Penalty, told about 20 supporters outside the Supermax prison on East Madison Street in Baltimore, where Baker is being held.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 22, 2002
LONG HAS IT been stated that the lawyer who represents himself has a fool for a client. Even more foolish is the non-lawyer who represents himself. Attorneys have made these assertions for decades, though it always struck me as a self-serving effort to keep the paying customers coming. One might ask: Where is the proof that the man who represents himself in our complex legal system is foolish? Proof? I got your proof right here. I have an outrage-filled letter from a criminal defendant to Jennifer Loew (J-Loew to friends and newspaper columnists)
NEWS
December 5, 2001
WHEN HE became Russia's president, Vladimir V. Putin pledged to practice a "dictatorship of the law." But instead of creating a predictable civil society of checks and balances, he has turned the legal process into an instrument of the Kremlin's power. The case against Russia's last independent television network is a revealing example. Stung by the criticism of TV-6, the Kremlin is forcing it off the air because of a minor technical violation of business law. This is the second time the Kremlin has used hardball tactics against a critical television network.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
Exactly 37 years ago, the Supreme Court ordered Maryland's highest court to review the case of some civil rights demonstrators arrested in Baltimore for refusing to leave a whites-only restaurant. Next week, one of those demonstrators will receive an award for his efforts to promote a lesson learned in that case. Robert M. Bell, chief judge of the state's highest court, will be honored Tuesday by the Pro Bono Resource Center of Baltimore for his efforts to improve access to the legal system.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 14, 2001
MOSCOW - Nearly four years ago, Yelena Kozlova stole a goat worth $20 to feed her three small, hungry children. Today, she is still in prison, serving a term of five years and six months, despite a plea from the Presidential Pardons Commission to free her. Until last fall, the Pardons Commission offered Russia's 1 million prisoners perhaps their only hope for compassion in a legal system widely described here as blind to circumstance and extraordinarily harsh...
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2000
Concerned that Latinos face daunting language and cultural barriers in the legal system, local Hispanic activists have formed a group to lobby for better treatment by courts and social service agencies. The Baltimore Latino Coalition for Justice will push for increased access to translators and for legislation making it a priority for government agencies to retain bilingual employees, said Beltran Navarro, an organizer. The coalition grew out of a December report by the Public Justice Center and CASA of Maryland, a Hispanic outreach group in Takoma Park, that concluded that Latino residents face obstacles in the legal arena.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1999
A longtime fixture in the county's legal arena is heading to the Republic of Georgia to help get the fledgling legal system in the former Soviet state on its feet.District Public Defender Alan R. Friedman is joining the American Bar Association's Eastern European law project as of Oct. 1 for an expected one-year stint, taking his first sabbatical since starting as an assistant public defender in Annapolis two decades ago. His task will be to help Georgians put into practice legal reforms that so far exist almost exclusively on paper in the country that came into its own again only nine years ago. About 95 percent of the trial-level judges have been on the bench less than a year.
TOPIC
By Rick Rockwell | July 4, 1999
IN LATE May, when Thomas Constantine announced he was stepping down as director of the Drug Enforcement Administration on July 1, he pointed his finger at the largest threat in the continuing drug war: Mexico's drug gangs."
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