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NEWS
By Phil Rogers | April 17, 2011
From the perspective of a citizen, not a baseball writer, it seems right for Barry Bonds to serve some jail time for his felony conviction on obstruction of justice. Some believe U.S. District Judge Susan Illston would be within her legal rights to throw out the conviction when she brings the participants from the 31/2-week trial back into her courtroom May 20. Maybe she will do that, but it seems Bonds deserves some real punishment, not just a slap on the wrist. Bonds thumbed his nose at the legal system, as he and hundreds of other steroid cheats had at baseball officials and fans in the years when there was no drug testing.
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NEWS
February 28, 2011
When politicians present a bill with a name that seems inoffensive to all like the "Civil Marriage Protection Act" and defend it with language that is "beat the drums for justice" and with a message that makes themselves the saviors of a group of people, I worry about the real motives and the extent with which deep thought has gone into such a vast legal move. I believe that all lifetime human committed relationships should have the legal protections of the state because they give to the state a stable population that contributes to the good of society in numerous ways.
NEWS
December 6, 2010
I am appalled by the Baltimore Sun's coverage of the recent incident in which a black teenager was allegedly beaten up by a member of Shomrim ( "Tension in Park Heights," Dec. 5). Our justice system requires a presumption of innocence until proven guilty by a court of law. Yet your reporters chose to totally disregard that basic tenet, tried and convicted a young man with no prior criminal record and then chose to interview rabble-rousing clergymen to justify their "verdict" and try to create a rift between the black and Jewish communities.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
Gut-wrenching stories of crimes at the hands of a father, a drunken driver and a pair of violent teens were among those retold and relived at a town hall meeting Tuesday night in Columbia. Most of the speakers' voices were calm as they advocated for change in the criminal justice system and for victims' rights. Residents of Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Cecil, Harford and Howard counties were invited to talk about their experiences as victims or relatives of victims before a panel at Long Reach High School, the second of four regional meetings planned statewide.
NEWS
By Barbara Babb and Mitchell Karpf | July 13, 2010
Unfortunately for so many in our society, family breakup is a fact of life. When a family dissolves, there is much more than furniture, houses or cars at stake — the identity of that family, including its children, is in the mix. That's why the way our legal system and our society respond to family dissolution needs to change. While people read about the travails of celebrities who commit marital infidelity, perhaps we should be upset that the huge headlines are not about the everyday families — those who often are devastated by their trek through the adversarial legal process that constitutes much of family law. The parties may emerge having disposed of a marriage but also having traumatized loved ones, exhausted their resources and diminished the well-being and self-esteem of their children and of each other.
NEWS
April 1, 2010
What is wrong with our legal system? Freedom of speech be damned, no one has the right to protest at a private funeral ("Anger over bill to Marine's dad," March 31). This solder lost his life defending freedom, but I don't think this church, or anyone, has the right to make this time more hurtful to a family. To ask the father to pay the church's legal expenses is outrageous. Kathy Benton
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
Shirley Harbin has worked as director of the victim witness assistance unit for the Howard County state's attorney's office for the past decade. The job of helping crime victims prepare for court proceedings may prove stressful at times. To stay inspired, Harbin says she relies on her history with the office, her supportive staff and her passion for helping others through what sometimes proves to be the most painful experience they've ever faced. Harbin oversees a staff of three - two victim advocates and a support staffer.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,SUN REPORTER | April 1, 2008
As details emerged about three youngsters apparently drowned by their father in a downtown hotel room over the weekend, legal experts and family advocates questioned whether Maryland law goes far enough to protect children in custody disputes. Some argue that judges are too quick to dismiss women's claims of abuse and too willing to award unsupervised visitation - even if one parent has a history of mental illness or battering the other. Amy Castillo, whose estranged husband, Mark Castillo, allegedly confessed to the killings, said in court documents that her husband had threatened to make her suffer by killing their children.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | March 2, 2008
The details of the crimes in the small Russian city were as grisly and shocking as any on the streets of Baltimore: a wife, long abused, who bludgeoned her spouse with an ax; another, beaten to death by her slovenly drunken husband; or another woman, who refused to testify against her abuser. Although she had come as an adviser from more than 4,000 miles away, the crimes had a familiar ring to Maryland first lady Catherine Curran O'Malley, a Baltimore District Court judge who often handles aspects of such cases.
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