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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | February 5, 1992
James Alton Markel Sr. has been charged with stealing two cars, forging checks, shoplifting and possession of drugs.He faces at leastsix more appearances in the coming months before judges in Carroll, Howard and Baltimore counties.Markel has been addicted to cocaine for more than a year.But that's not all that's working against the 34-year-old father of two in his dealings with the legal system -- he's been deaf since birth.And that, say his parents and others in and out of the state's legal system, has proven to be a barrier to fair treatment in the courts and successful treatment for his addiction.
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NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 2, 2002
LONDON -- A question facing Britain's Parliament is this: Should a man who stood trial before his peers 20 years ago -- and was judged innocent -- be forced to stand trial again if new evidence such as DNA indicates that he committed the crime? The answer by Parliament, if it goes along with the government of Prime Minister Tony Blair, is likely to be, yes -- try the man again. The proposed change in the double-jeopardy law, which now prevents defendants from being tried for the same crime twice, is one element in a sweeping package proposed by Blair's government.
NEWS
February 28, 2011
When politicians present a bill with a name that seems inoffensive to all like the "Civil Marriage Protection Act" and defend it with language that is "beat the drums for justice" and with a message that makes themselves the saviors of a group of people, I worry about the real motives and the extent with which deep thought has gone into such a vast legal move. I believe that all lifetime human committed relationships should have the legal protections of the state because they give to the state a stable population that contributes to the good of society in numerous ways.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
Regarding the Sunpaper article "O'Malley seeks answers from DHS on immigration program," (Feb. 12), I understand prioritization and focusing on the "big fish. " But once an immigrant has been detained, should the Department of Homeland Security have the latitude to say, you are here illegally but you are otherwise law abiding so we will let you go.? That discretion puts us on a slippery slope. What other laws should we be allowed to ignore because we disagree with them? Maybe the higher deportation rate of the non-violent illegal immigrants in Maryland is due to the fact that Maryland issues drivers licenses to immigrants that are here illegally and therefore has unwittingly enabled DHS to more easily identify, find, and deport the "little fish.
NEWS
September 30, 2014
Can anybody explain why Johns Hopkins is liable for any of the reprehensible actions of Dr. Nikita Levy ( "Attorney says Hopkins was informed of improper exams before investigation," Sept. 26)? Why is Johns Hopkins Medicine agreeing to pay anything to the victims of Dr. Levy's serious transgressions? Was Johns Hopkins in any way responsible for the harm that was caused to Dr. Levy's victims? In all of the reporting on this case I have never heard one thing that would indicate Dr. Levy's actions were allowed or caused or in any way made possible by Johns Hopkins.
NEWS
By ERIC ZORN | November 18, 1993
Chicago. -- The American system of law and practice of journalism make it so that the seemingly outlandish allegations of a nobody like Steven Cook can force a powerful somebody like Cardinal Joseph Bernardin to account.The courts and the media take such charges seriously, despite the vast difference in station and public credibility between the accuser and the accused. The details of the charges are not kept secret until a judge or panel can decide if there is a shred of a chance that they are true; instead they are published and freely disseminated before the presentation in court of even one piece of real evidence.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | August 25, 1992
Baltimore lawyer J. Michael McWilliams became president of the 370,000-member American Bar Association (ABA) at the group's annual convention this month.Mr. McWilliams, 53, a senior partner in the Baltimore firm of Tydings & Rosenberg, is the first Marylander to head the association. He takes office at a time when lawyers and lawsuits are being blamed for some of the nation's economic problems.Q: President Bush and Vice President Quayle are blaming trial lawyers for generating too many lawsuits and hurting the nation's competitiveness.
NEWS
September 19, 1993
Not All Charges Are TrueCarl Hackman's letter (Sept. 12, 1993) compels me to write commmending him on his support of Harry Lentz. Too few individuals are willing to stand up and be counted in support of "non-sensational" views. I have lost faith in our legal system, having been the victim of large corporation whose apparent philosophy is also "guilty until proven innocent.` As with Mr. Lentz, my reputation may also have been damaged beyond repair.I can speak from personal experience after being abruptly fired after 32 years with a company on the basis of false and unsubstantiated charges by a recently hired woman employee.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2003
When Gustavo Torres asked his class, "Who works in front of the 7-Eleven on Broadway?" in upper Fells Point, he got a variety of answers: braceros, jornaleros, esquineros -- all Spanish words for "day workers." And what distinguishes these people? asked Torres, executive director of CASA of Maryland, a nonprofit legal aid group. "They don't know their rights," one class member replied. Torres and other volunteers with CASA of Maryland have been holding classes in the Fells Point area to teach Baltimore's immigrant workers, mainly Latino men, about those rights.
NEWS
By VICKIE J. GRAY | April 27, 1995
An article by Vickie J. Gray on the Opinion * Commentary page Thursday incorrectly identified her as the president of the Baltimore chapter of the National Law Firm Merchandising Association. In fact, she is immediate past president.The Sun regrets the errors.One of the more disturbing elements of the recent Nathaniel Hurt trial is that the defendant hired a lawyer who had not tried a murder case in 10 years. That lawyer, Stephen L. Miles, allowed Hurt to reject a plea bargain that would have spared him jail time for fatally shooting a boy; he then was convicted and sentenced to prison.
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