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By HAL RIEDL | May 25, 1991
A recent Maryland Court of Appeals decision reminds us what atightly self-protected club the profession of law is. Just because we're paranoid doesn't mean the lawyers aren't out to get us.Marylanders with long memories of justice delayed will remember Lance Bethea. His mother was murdered in October 1986. The 19-month-old boy was the beneficiary of her two insurance policies, totaling $77,417. Using a forged court order representing the boy's maternal grandmother as his legal guardian, attorney Michael Mitchell hijacked both insurance checks.
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NEWS
July 3, 2013
After her appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court, Sandra Day O'Connor observed that the significance of that decision was not that she "will decide cases as a woman, but that I am a woman who will get to decide cases. " And so it is for Mary Ellen Barbera, the one-time Baltimore city school teacher who was appointed Wednesday by Gov. Martin O'Malley to Maryland's highest judicial office, chief judge of the Court of Appeals. Not only is Judge Barbera the first women to be named to head the state's judiciary, but with the elevation of Baltimore's Judge Shirley M. Watts from the Court of Special Appeals to the Court of Appeals, women now constitute a majority on the high court.
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FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | March 15, 1991
''Class Action'' is a classy movie, a facile mixture of domestic and courtroom drama. It should take its place on the same shelf that holds films like ''The Verdict.''Gene Hackman and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio star as father and daughter. He is getting up there in years, which may be why he has been wenching a little less than he did in his earlier years.His wife has forgiven him. She knew about the philandering, but she chose to stay, see the marriage through, and she isn't sorry she has done so.Their daughter, however, has been less forgiving.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
As the executive director of the Maryland Professionalism Center, I was drawn to The Sun's June 10th op-ed- piece titled "Justice delayed in Maryland," which promised a commentary on the potential prejudice to litigants caused by the Maryland Court of Appeals' delay in deciding the cases before it. I was puzzled, however, by the writers' charge of an "aggressive semi-political agenda" on the part of the Court of Appeals with regard to the Maryland Professionalism...
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
Don't tell Roger A. Perkins any lawyer jokes.The recently elected president of the Maryland State Bar Association has probably already heard them. And he's tired of the stereotypes slapped on the legal profession.His mission, as head of the 15,500-member state bar, is to get people to recognize the flip side of the coin."I'm always on the lookout for negative things said about the legal profession, because there are a lot of positive things we do," said Mr. Perkins, 49, an Arnold resident who has a family law practice in Annapolis.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
After her appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court, Sandra Day O'Connor observed that the significance of that decision was not that she "will decide cases as a woman, but that I am a woman who will get to decide cases. " And so it is for Mary Ellen Barbera, the one-time Baltimore city school teacher who was appointed Wednesday by Gov. Martin O'Malley to Maryland's highest judicial office, chief judge of the Court of Appeals. Not only is Judge Barbera the first women to be named to head the state's judiciary, but with the elevation of Baltimore's Judge Shirley M. Watts from the Court of Special Appeals to the Court of Appeals, women now constitute a majority on the high court.
BUSINESS
By Graeme Browning | October 21, 1990
In the early 1980s a young lawyer with one of the most prestigious law firms in New York City used to boast to friends about the way he got his laundry done.Instead of carting his dirty clothes down to the basement laundry room in his 25-story condominium tower, he would take them along on business trips."It's easy," he would say proudly. "I get the hotel to wash my clothes, and then I bill our clients for it."Life used to be pretty plush for lawyers with large law firms, in Baltimore and in the rest of the country.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
Are lawyers running the country into the ground?Not guilty! says the Maryland State Bar Association, which is sending out a fact sheet to dispute Bush administration figures that suggest lawyers and their lawsuits are the root of many evils.According to President Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle, the United States has 70 percent of the world's lawyers despite having only about 5 percent of its population.Objection! says the state bar association.The fact sheet uses estimates from University of Wisconsin Professor Marc Galanter, who says the country has 25 to 35 percent of the world's lawyers.
NEWS
March 14, 1996
AT LEAST the Maryland Bar Association admits that its failure to act quickly in the wake of the recent train tragedy in Silver Spring was wrong. By not putting a disaster plan into effect, the bar association made it easy for some members of the legal profession to fulfill the public's worst image of lawyers as greedy and insensitive to the feelings of families still stunned by grief.But a penitent glance backward is not enough. The bar association actually has a disaster plan for such occasions, drawn up in 1989 and, so far, unused.
NEWS
By Nora Koch and Nora Koch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 24, 1997
Charles "Mike" Preston, a partner in the Westminster law firm Stoner, Preston & Boswell, has been nominated to head the Maryland State Bar Association.Preston will be sworn in at the MSBA annual meeting in June for a one-year term.Preston said he had been urged several times to run for president and felt that this was the time."I was encouraged to pursue the presidency, and after having the good fortune to serve as an officer for a number of years, I felt it was time to accept this responsibility," Preston said.
NEWS
By Karen H. Rothenberg | June 25, 2008
After almost a decade as a law school dean, I have learned that I can count on two stories involving our school to appear in the news media every year. The first is publication of the annual U.S. News and World Report rankings. The other is the announcement of skyrocketing first-year salaries for the small percentage of graduates heading to work at large national firms. Unfortunately, these two widely publicized stories perpetuate some of the worst stereotypes about the legal profession - it is a cutthroat, big-money game where success is easily quantified, whether by the number of ranking spots your law school climbs or the size of your first paycheck.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2004
The Rev. Edward Joseph Kushubar, a former lawyer turned minister who pastored St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church in Highlandtown for more than two decades, died of cancer May 1 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Perry Hall resident was 75. Mr. Kushubar was born and raised in Stamford, Conn., and earned a bachelor's degree in biochemistry from Harvard University in 1950. After graduating from Harvard, he was drafted into the Army and served with an artillery unit in Korea, where he attained the rank of lieutenant.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2000
John Charles Evelius, a retired founding partner of the Baltimore law firm of Gallagher, Evelius and Jones, who counseled the Archdiocese of Baltimore and Catholic Charities, died Wednesday of congestive heart failure at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 74. The Ellicott City resident retired in 1996 from the law firm, located in the Park Charles Building at 218 N. Charles St., which he had established in 1961 with Francis X. Gallagher, a highly respected Baltimore attorney and civic leader.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1999
Baltimore-based Venable Baetjer & Howard said yesterday that it plans to merge with Tucker Flyer of Washington in a transaction intended to strengthen the business practices of both law firms in the Washington-Baltimore corridor.The merger will add Tucker's 55 lawyers to Venable's 295, giving the combined firm 190 lawyers in Washington and about 160 in Baltimore.The deal is expected to give Venable the second-largest number of lawyers -- 350 -- in the Baltimore-Washington area, behind Hogan & Hartson.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1999
The Howard County Women's Bar Association is dispatching female lawyers and judges to middle school classrooms to speak with pupils about the legal profession and answer such questions as "Why does Judge Judy act the way she does?""We're getting them to think about different aspects of the law," said Ria Rothvarg, chairwoman of the Law Day committee of the Women's Bar Association.Since 1996, female lawyers and judges have been speaking to Howard County middle schoolers. Rothvarg said they are trying to reach eighth-graders who are learning about the U.S. Constitution and just beginning to think about careers.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1999
Phi Alpha Delta law fraternity, a nonprofit professional association of lawyers, students and others with links to the law profession, will move its international headquarters to Baltimore this spring.The association has purchased a four-story office building at 345 N. Charles St. and plans to relocate from Granada Hills, Calif.The move will take several months, and the association will briefly operate in both locations.But the Baltimore headquarters will ultimately house all of Phi Alpha Delta's administrative offices -- including about 12 employees -- and the association's Public Service Center, dedicated to law-related education of elementary and high school students.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2000
John Charles Evelius, a retired founding partner of the Baltimore law firm of Gallagher, Evelius and Jones, who counseled the Archdiocese of Baltimore and Catholic Charities, died Wednesday of congestive heart failure at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 74. The Ellicott City resident retired in 1996 from the law firm, located in the Park Charles Building at 218 N. Charles St., which he had established in 1961 with Francis X. Gallagher, a highly respected Baltimore attorney and civic leader.
NEWS
July 10, 1993
THIS DEPARTMENT hereby appoints itself Manager for a Day of the Baltimore Orioles, a fitting move for the All-Star celebrations.Having vested ourselves with this new authority, we will address the problem of what to do about Cal Ripken, who, as everyone knows, is not having a career year.Johnny Oates, the titular manager of the Birds, has been playing the junior Ripken in third or fifth spot in the batting order.As an exercise in nostalgia and as tribute to one of the biggest salaries in baseball, this is in keeping with Mr. Oates' well-known diplomacy.
NEWS
March 5, 1998
Series on lawyers unfairly depicted role of trust fundThe Sun series "Lawyers on trial" (Feb. 22 and 23) did not fairly portray the role of the Clients' Security Trust Fund of the Bar of Maryland in compensating victims of dishonest lawyers.The article said that if the victim cannot recover from the lawyer, he or she must then "navigate" the fund's claim process. That implies that the procedure is difficult, which it is not.To submit a claim, a victim merely has to complete the fund's claim form and file it with the fund.
NEWS
By Nora Koch and Nora Koch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 24, 1997
Charles "Mike" Preston, a partner in the Westminster law firm Stoner, Preston & Boswell, has been nominated to head the Maryland State Bar Association.Preston will be sworn in at the MSBA annual meeting in June for a one-year term.Preston said he had been urged several times to run for president and felt that this was the time."I was encouraged to pursue the presidency, and after having the good fortune to serve as an officer for a number of years, I felt it was time to accept this responsibility," Preston said.
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