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NEWS
by Annie Linskey | August 24, 2012
The House GOP caucus in Annapolis put out a statement this afternoon that they are "troubled" by the behavior of Republican Del. Don Dwyer, who has acknowledged being drunk while piloting a  speedboat that collided with another vessel and sent six people to the hospital. Dwyer admitted that he had a .2 blood alcohol level -- more than twice the legal limit -- when he was driving his boat Wednesday evening in the Magothy River. Dwyer's boat sank. Two adults and four children were hospitalized.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
Ravens running back Ray Rice is scheduled to speak at a news conference Friday afternoon at the Under Armour Performance Center, his first public comments since he was arrested and ultimately charged with one count of aggravated assault following an altercation with his then fiancee, Janay Palmer. Palmer, who married Rice in March, will also take part in the 3 p.m. news conference. To this point, Rice hasn't commented on the situation, letting the legal process play out. Rice, 27, learned earlier this week that he was accepted into a diversionary program that could allow him to clear his record on the charge, stemming from an incident at an Atlantic City, N.J. casino.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
Ravens running back Ray Rice is scheduled to speak at a news conference Friday afternoon at the Under Armour Performance Center, his first public comments since he was arrested and ultimately charged with one count of aggravated assault following an altercation with his then fiancee, Janay Palmer. Palmer, who married Rice in March, will also take part in the 3 p.m. news conference. To this point, Rice hasn't commented on the situation, letting the legal process play out. Rice, 27, learned earlier this week that he was accepted into a diversionary program that could allow him to clear his record on the charge, stemming from an incident at an Atlantic City, N.J. casino.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
With lawmakers still far apart on how to overhaul Maryland's bail system, legislative leaders and the O'Malley administration have cobbled together a short-term fix that involves an executive order and recruiting private attorneys for little or no pay to represent poor defendants. At the direction of legislative leaders, a joint House and Senate committee has set aside $10 million in the state budget to address a ruling by Maryland's highest court that the current bail system is unconstitutional because it fails to provide lawyers early enough in the process.
NEWS
March 27, 2012
Litigants in the case against the State Center development in Baltimore are decrying a bill that passed the House of Delegates setting out new rules for public-private partnerships in Maryland. At issue is a provision that allows a party in such a suit to appeal a circuit court judge's denial of a motion to dismiss before the two sides are forced to exchange documents through the discovery process, and before they are allowed to present evidence at trial. The coalition of downtown property owners who are suing to stop State Center - attorneyPeter G. Angeloschief among them - is calling the bill, which applies to current as well as future cases, an extraordinary intervention by the legislature in an ongoing court proceeding.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | March 27, 2012
One week after Maryland received a D- for corruption risk on a national report, legislators are poised to cement crony capitalism into the state code. Allegedly designed to expedite major developments and create jobs, legislation supported by Gov.Martin O'Malleyoutlining rules for public-private partnerships passed the House on Monday. The amendments in HB 576 - which give public-private partnerships special legal status, and do it retroactively - show this legislation is about one project near and dear to the O'Malley administration: State Center.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
With lawmakers still far apart on how to overhaul Maryland's bail system, legislative leaders and the O'Malley administration have cobbled together a short-term fix that involves an executive order and recruiting private attorneys for little or no pay to represent poor defendants. At the direction of legislative leaders, a joint House and Senate committee has set aside $10 million in the state budget to address a ruling by Maryland's highest court that the current bail system is unconstitutional because it fails to provide lawyers early enough in the process.
BUSINESS
By Patrick Rossello | December 10, 1990
IF YOUR DISPUTE with another company appears to be headed for court, you need to know some basics about the judicial system. Perhaps you can handle the matter yourself in small claims court. If the case is more serious, you'll need to hire a lawyer. Either way, it helps to know what to expect once you enter the legal process.Small claims: A dispute over an amount under $2,500 can be heard in in small claims. The structure of that court allows for a relaxation of the rules of evidence. This means you don't need to be a Perry Mason to represent yourself.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | January 25, 2008
No immediate disciplinary action will be taken in response to the filing of criminal charges against Baltimore District Judge Askew W. Gatewood Jr., a spokesman for the Maryland judiciary said yesterday. "The court will let the legal process work. Judge Gatewood has been a judge for more than 23 years. These charges do not relate to his performance on the bench," said the spokesman, Darrell S. Pressley. A lawyer for Gatewood said he did not expect the charges -- stemming from allegations that the judge failed to clean up hundreds of tons of construction rubble dumped on his waterfront property in Anne Arundel County -- to have any effect on Gatewood's judgeship.
NEWS
April 4, 1997
IT IS DIFFICULT ENOUGH for domestic violence victims to take the first step and file court charges against a spouse or mate in a potentially life-threatening relationship. Once the legal process begins, however, fragile victims often need help getting through the system.This is where Howard County has fallen short.The state's attorney's office has not responded as well as some of its neighbors in helping battered women who enter the courthouse. Victims should not have to go it alone.Police officers and the courts are more sensitive to brutal acts of spousal abuse than they were a decade ago. More public attention to this problem and changes in the system have given victims the strength they need to get help.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | August 24, 2012
The House GOP caucus in Annapolis put out a statement this afternoon that they are "troubled" by the behavior of Republican Del. Don Dwyer, who has acknowledged being drunk while piloting a  speedboat that collided with another vessel and sent six people to the hospital. Dwyer admitted that he had a .2 blood alcohol level -- more than twice the legal limit -- when he was driving his boat Wednesday evening in the Magothy River. Dwyer's boat sank. Two adults and four children were hospitalized.
NEWS
March 27, 2012
Litigants in the case against the State Center development in Baltimore are decrying a bill that passed the House of Delegates setting out new rules for public-private partnerships in Maryland. At issue is a provision that allows a party in such a suit to appeal a circuit court judge's denial of a motion to dismiss before the two sides are forced to exchange documents through the discovery process, and before they are allowed to present evidence at trial. The coalition of downtown property owners who are suing to stop State Center - attorneyPeter G. Angeloschief among them - is calling the bill, which applies to current as well as future cases, an extraordinary intervention by the legislature in an ongoing court proceeding.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | March 27, 2012
One week after Maryland received a D- for corruption risk on a national report, legislators are poised to cement crony capitalism into the state code. Allegedly designed to expedite major developments and create jobs, legislation supported by Gov.Martin O'Malleyoutlining rules for public-private partnerships passed the House on Monday. The amendments in HB 576 - which give public-private partnerships special legal status, and do it retroactively - show this legislation is about one project near and dear to the O'Malley administration: State Center.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | January 25, 2008
No immediate disciplinary action will be taken in response to the filing of criminal charges against Baltimore District Judge Askew W. Gatewood Jr., a spokesman for the Maryland judiciary said yesterday. "The court will let the legal process work. Judge Gatewood has been a judge for more than 23 years. These charges do not relate to his performance on the bench," said the spokesman, Darrell S. Pressley. A lawyer for Gatewood said he did not expect the charges -- stemming from allegations that the judge failed to clean up hundreds of tons of construction rubble dumped on his waterfront property in Anne Arundel County -- to have any effect on Gatewood's judgeship.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 19, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - It was the first of several attempts by the U.S. military to tell Iraqi journalists about the courts-martial scheduled to begin today, but the seminar did not go well. Two of the six Iraqis who showed up for the session walked out when the military lawyer refused to discuss details of the case against Spc. Jeremy C. Sivits, who is accused of taking at least one photograph of fellow American soldiers mistreating Iraqi detainees at Abu Ghraib prison. Two more Iraqis left after learning that the maximum penalty that Sivits faces is expulsion from the Army and one year in jail.
TOPIC
By Jonathan Turley and Jonathan Turley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 2001
THE TERRORISTS who struck America on Sept. 11 did not only strive to kill Americans but, in the recent words of Mullah Mohammed Omar, the Taliban leader, they wanted to destroy America. They wanted to change us fundamentally and, on Nov. 13, they may have succeeded to a degree. President Bush fundamentally changed our legal process in the name of fighting the likes of Osama bin Laden and Mullah Omar. Bush declared that he could not adequately "protect the United States and its citizens" without creating a secret military tribunal that would be exempt from the most basic principles governing American justice.
NEWS
January 15, 1996
THE FIRST LEGAL consequences of Howard County's seven-month-long crackdown on sex-act massage parlors should be no cause for pride in county law enforcement: an unlicensed masseuse (who got a county license only after starting work) agreed to forfeit that license for a year.Twelve other women charged with violations of the year-old county law saw their scheduled cases in District Court postponed or shifted (at their request) to jury trials in Circuit Court. This despite the county prosecutor's offer to make similar deals on the alleged license-requirement offenses.
NEWS
November 10, 2000
AMERICANS crave instant gratification. So it's hard to contemplate a presidential election that could take days or weeks to resolve. But it could happen. Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush each remain short of the electoral votes needed to win the presidency. All eyes are now focused on Florida, where the outcome could remain in doubt for some time - not just because of the uncertain vote totals, but also because of legal challenges to the voting process. The Florida recount may not be definitive without additional re-checking and manual examinations of punch-card ballots.
NEWS
November 17, 2000
WASHINGTON - Six courts, 13 lawsuits, dozens of lawyers, stacks of paper, a multitude of legal issues. Those are the ingredients of the process that could settle the presidential election. The process is moving fast - something the legal system seldom does. The Sun 's Lyle Denniston explores the process and what to expect. What is the next move? A number of legal maneuvers are approaching the decisive stage. A state judge is to rule this morning on the dispute over recounting votes by hand.
NEWS
November 10, 2000
AMERICANS crave instant gratification. So it's hard to contemplate a presidential election that could take days or weeks to resolve. But it could happen. Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush each remain short of the electoral votes needed to win the presidency. All eyes are now focused on Florida, where the outcome could remain in doubt for some time - not just because of the uncertain vote totals, but also because of legal challenges to the voting process. The Florida recount may not be definitive without additional re-checking and manual examinations of punch-card ballots.
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