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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2002
When Benjamin Brown accidentally fired a pistol in the cabin of a ship docked off Peru in 1859, he had no way of knowing he would make legal history in his native Maryland. But he did. The shot killed a shipmate, Brown was convicted of manslaughter, and his fight for freedom eventually reached Abraham Lincoln, who signed a presidential pardon forgiving the $666 fine that Brown couldn't pay after he served a three-year prison term in Baltimore City Jail. The pardon signed by the Great Emancipator in 1863 is expected to be the centerpiece of a museum set to open in the spring on the second floor of the Garmatz Federal Courthouse on West Lombard Street in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Eric Rozenman | March 11, 2014
Support for decriminalizing recreational marijuana use and increasing its medicinal availability spreads like an oil spill. Colorado and Washington's decriminalization, coupled with President Barack Obama musing that marijuana is no more dangerous than alcohol - though he hopes his children will avoid the former as a bad habit - accelerate the change. Supporters seek to end so-called victimless crimes and regulate a popular activity wrongly stigmatized. Revenue-hungry states like Maryland, with Senate Bill 658, consider joining them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | September 4, 2005
LEGAL HISTORY THE TRIAL: A HISTORY, FROM SOCRATES TO O.J. SIMPSON By Sadakat Kadri. Random House. 480 pages. In 1510, priests in Autun, France, learning that rats were destroying the barley crop, ordered all rats to appear in court. But despite numerous legal proclamations, no rats showed up. Nevertheless, the bishop appointed a brilliant young lawyer, Bartholomew Chassenee, to represent the rats, and Chassenee successfully argued that since the rats were so numerous, it was impossible that they had all received legal notice.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2013
Maryland's highest-ranking judge, Robert M. Bell, likes that his courthouse is dedicated to his predecessor, pointing out that the letters etching Robert C. Murphy's name on the building's exterior are filled in gold paint to make sure even nighttime drivers can see it. As Bell approaches retirement, mandatory when he turns 70 in July, he scoffs at the notion that his name might someday grace a building as well. But then, his name is forever etched in legal history by virtue of the Supreme Court case Bell v. Maryland.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2013
Maryland's highest-ranking judge, Robert M. Bell, likes that his courthouse is dedicated to his predecessor, pointing out that the letters etching Robert C. Murphy's name on the building's exterior are filled in gold paint to make sure even nighttime drivers can see it. As Bell approaches retirement, mandatory when he turns 70 in July, he scoffs at the notion that his name might someday grace a building as well. But then, his name is forever etched in legal history by virtue of the Supreme Court case Bell v. Maryland.
NEWS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1997
While doing research for "Histories of the Bench and Bar of Baltimore City," a book he co-edited, Circuit Judge John Carroll Byrnes learned that the City Council and the city's first court shared quarters when the city charter took effect 200 years ago.This year, Byrnes informed the City Council that the bicentennial of the council's first meeting was Feb. 27, 1997, and that the occasion should be celebrated. But the council decided to wait until fall to mark the event.So Wednesday, during a ceremony to celebrate the start of this year's Circuit Court term,the council will hold a commemorative meeting in the courthouse.
NEWS
By Eric Rozenman | March 11, 2014
Support for decriminalizing recreational marijuana use and increasing its medicinal availability spreads like an oil spill. Colorado and Washington's decriminalization, coupled with President Barack Obama musing that marijuana is no more dangerous than alcohol - though he hopes his children will avoid the former as a bad habit - accelerate the change. Supporters seek to end so-called victimless crimes and regulate a popular activity wrongly stigmatized. Revenue-hungry states like Maryland, with Senate Bill 658, consider joining them.
FEATURES
By Jill Jonnes and Jill Jonnes,Special to the sun | October 11, 1998
It has become very much the fashion on the left and the righ to denounce the "war on drugs" as a failure so abject that the only possible solution is to legalize drugs. The legalizers have taken to speaking of drug "Prohibition," as if cocaine and heroin were comparable to alcohol, and insisting that the big problem is, and always has been, not the drugs themselves but our drug laws. The latest entry from the left is Hollywood filmmaker Mike Gray's "Drug Crazy: How We Got Into This Mess & How We Can Get Out" (Random House, 251 pages, $23.95)
NEWS
July 19, 2005
Maryland New Directions, a nonprofit career counseling center at 611 Park Ave. in Mount Vernon, is offering workshops for job seekers. From 10 a.m. to noon today, participants can learn to write or improve a resume. A seminar on answering difficult questions during interviews is planned from 10 a.m. to noon Thursday. A workshop for ex-felons from 10 a.m. to noon July 26 will focus on discussing one's legal history with an employer. Information: 410-230-0630.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
A news story and a Dan Rodricks ' column about the marvels of Baltimore buildings in one day - my cup runneth over ("New colors for old church" and "Let your eyes wander to see city shine," Sept. 12)! I'm not from the city, but the magnificence of local architecture is astounding and too frequently overlooked by city residents. Years ago I used to give tours of City Hall, and today I'm helping folks explore the beauty of The Clarence M. Mitchell, Jr. Courthouse as a docent at The Museum of Baltimore Legal History.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | September 4, 2005
LEGAL HISTORY THE TRIAL: A HISTORY, FROM SOCRATES TO O.J. SIMPSON By Sadakat Kadri. Random House. 480 pages. In 1510, priests in Autun, France, learning that rats were destroying the barley crop, ordered all rats to appear in court. But despite numerous legal proclamations, no rats showed up. Nevertheless, the bishop appointed a brilliant young lawyer, Bartholomew Chassenee, to represent the rats, and Chassenee successfully argued that since the rats were so numerous, it was impossible that they had all received legal notice.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2002
When Benjamin Brown accidentally fired a pistol in the cabin of a ship docked off Peru in 1859, he had no way of knowing he would make legal history in his native Maryland. But he did. The shot killed a shipmate, Brown was convicted of manslaughter, and his fight for freedom eventually reached Abraham Lincoln, who signed a presidential pardon forgiving the $666 fine that Brown couldn't pay after he served a three-year prison term in Baltimore City Jail. The pardon signed by the Great Emancipator in 1863 is expected to be the centerpiece of a museum set to open in the spring on the second floor of the Garmatz Federal Courthouse on West Lombard Street in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Jill Jonnes and Jill Jonnes,Special to the sun | October 11, 1998
It has become very much the fashion on the left and the righ to denounce the "war on drugs" as a failure so abject that the only possible solution is to legalize drugs. The legalizers have taken to speaking of drug "Prohibition," as if cocaine and heroin were comparable to alcohol, and insisting that the big problem is, and always has been, not the drugs themselves but our drug laws. The latest entry from the left is Hollywood filmmaker Mike Gray's "Drug Crazy: How We Got Into This Mess & How We Can Get Out" (Random House, 251 pages, $23.95)
NEWS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1997
While doing research for "Histories of the Bench and Bar of Baltimore City," a book he co-edited, Circuit Judge John Carroll Byrnes learned that the City Council and the city's first court shared quarters when the city charter took effect 200 years ago.This year, Byrnes informed the City Council that the bicentennial of the council's first meeting was Feb. 27, 1997, and that the occasion should be celebrated. But the council decided to wait until fall to mark the event.So Wednesday, during a ceremony to celebrate the start of this year's Circuit Court term,the council will hold a commemorative meeting in the courthouse.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | December 29, 2007
As if Ravens' followers needed any more indignity, the guy who traded on the misfortunes of the hometown team for some cheap publicity has been arrested for allegedly being a deadbeat dad. Ron Stach, who was known by the Seuss-like nickname of the "Goof on the Roof" and promised he would stay atop a Canton bar until either the Ravens broke their losing streak or coach Brian Billick was fired, was arrested this week for allegedly owing more than $34,000...
NEWS
December 8, 1996
THERE IS NO SHORTAGE of Baltimore groups wanting to preserve relics of the past. Just look at a partial list of the city's lesser-known cultural offerings. There is a museum dedicated to the development of dentistry, of pharmacy, of incandescent lighting, of legal history and of lacrosse. Waiting in the wings is a group hoping to open a national museum of live entertainment and another that wants to impress visitors with the mighty sounds of restored pipe organs.In the end many of these interest groups either thrive or disappear, based on their ability to raise adequate funds.
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