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ENTERTAINMENT
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
The Anne Arundel County measure that could have required County Executive John R. Leopold to repay his legal expenses was withdrawn Monday night before it came to a vote. County Councilman Jamie Benoit, the sponsor, said he plans to let the state deal with the question of forcing public officials to repay taxpayers when a politician's actions put the government on the losing end of a lawsuit. The withdrawn legislation by Benoit, a Democrat from Crownsville, was similar to a state bill proposed by Sen. Bryan Simonaire, a Republican from Pasadena.
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HEALTH
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
More than two dozen of Dr. Nikita Levy's former patients have filed an objection to a $190 million class-action settlement over the Johns Hopkins gynecologist's malpractice. The plaintiffs cited an "excessive legal fee" requested by the lawyers who negotiated the settlement and a lack of clarity regarding the amount each patient would receive, according to the objection. The settlement - one of the largest ever of its kind - was announced in July, five months after investigators found more than 1,300 videos and images, surreptitiously recorded during pelvic exams, in Levy's home and office.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
A federal judge on Tuesday denied a bid by poultry producer Perdue and an Eastern Shore farmer to make the Waterkeeper Alliance pay more than $3 million in attorneys' fees for its failed lawsuit alleging that the company and its contract grower were polluting a Chesapeake Bay tributary. Judge William M. Nickerson concluded that while he believed the New York-based environmental group had mishandled preparation of its case, that did not merit the rare sanction of making the losing alliance pay the other side's attorneys.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Anne Arundel County government must pay more than $100,000 in attorneys' fees to a former county employee who sued, claiming she was wrongfully fired by former County Executive John R. Leopold.. U.S. District Court Judge Catherine C. Blake on Wednesday awarded just over $103,000 in legal fees as well as court costs to Karla Hamner, a former government spokeswoman. Hamner previously accepted a settlement offer from the county of $110,000 plus attorneys' fees. In total, she'll get about $214,000.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
A state senator wants a new law to compel Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold to repay his taxpayer-funded defense if found guilty in a pending discrimination case. Sen. Bryan Simonaire announced Monday that state bill drafters are crafting legislation that would require elected local and state officials to refund taxpayers for legal fees and court awards when guilty in criminal or civil cases. Simonaire said he requested "The Taxpayer Protection Act" after Leopold, a fellow Republican, did not publicly pledge to repay the tab of a $450-an-hour attorney hired by the county.
NEWS
September 26, 1990
A bigger load of foster-care cases and other lawsuits this year has forced the Carroll County Department of Social Services to ask the state and county for help in paying legal costs.The department had been projecting a deficit of $75,000 in legal fees for the 1990-1991 fiscal year ending next June 30, but will get somemoney from the state Department of Human Resources to offset that, said M.Alexander Jones, director of the local DSS office on Distillery Drive.Jones told the board of directors yesterday that his office has a budget of $46,750 for legal expenses, but is already spending at a rate of $10,000 a month.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1995
City Council President Mary Pat Clarke called on Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke yesterday to divulge all the legal fees that have been paid to a closely connected Baltimore law firm.Mrs. Clarke, who is running against the mayor in September's Democratic primary, said Baltimore taxpayers should be told exactly how much Shapiro and Olander receives for representing the city and its quasi-public agencies.Mrs. Clarke was quick to respond to a report in The Sun yesterday that revealed that Shapiro and Olander, a downtown law firm with strong ties to Mr. Schmoke, had collected at least $1.4 million for city-related legal work in the past 3 1/2 years.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
Anne Arundel County's former police chief, who retired to end a criminal investigation into his conduct, unsuccessfully lobbied the county to pay his $40,000 legal tab. The county denied Chief James Teare Sr.'s request, arguing that his expenses did not qualify for a fund designed to protect innocent employees from legal bills. According to a letter obtained Thursday by The Baltimore Sun, Teare's attorney said the legal fees were incurred as Teare defended himself in the investigation of County Executive John R. Leopold's use of a police security detail.
NEWS
July 27, 1995
More questions have been raised than answered by the report on legal fees paid to non-staff attorneys that Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has finally made public. The mayor may have fulfilled his promise to provide "the most extensive disclosure of law fees that this city has ever seen," but the inch-thick report doesn't include enough information to be called "full disclosure."The report reveals which law firms have been retained by the city from Jan. 1, 1991, to June 30, 1995. But there is not enough detail about the the legal work performed to tell whether the fees were reasonable or whether expertise beyond the scope of the city legal department was necessary.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
Tom J. Billman, the convicted financier whose attempts to hide millions in Europe were exposed two weeks ago by federal prosecutors, is asking the U.S. government to help pay his legal fees.In court filings, the former chairman of Bethesda-based Community Savings and Loan says he has more than $6.5 million in cash, gems and other assets, much of it frozen by the Austrian government.But Billman, who is awaiting sentencing on a fraud conviction, claims that he is impoverished and asks for a court-appointed, government-paid lawyer.
NEWS
September 22, 2013
After nearly four years, the legal battles of local family farmers Alan and Kristen Hudson are coming to a close. On behalf of Save Farm Families and Wicomico County Young Farmers and Ranchers, I am disappointed that Judge William M. Nickerson decided last month not to award legal fees to the Hudsons after he found that the radical Waterkeeper Alliance was unable to prove that pollution was coming from their poultry operation. Wanting to see the Hudsons awarded legal fees wasn't so much about the money.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
A federal judge on Tuesday denied a bid by poultry producer Perdue and an Eastern Shore farmer to make the Waterkeeper Alliance pay more than $3 million in attorneys' fees for its failed lawsuit alleging that the company and its contract grower were polluting a Chesapeake Bay tributary. Judge William M. Nickerson concluded that while he believed the New York-based environmental group had mishandled preparation of its case, that did not merit the rare sanction of making the losing alliance pay the other side's attorneys.
NEWS
March 26, 2013
Dan Rodricks ' column was on target ("To monitor farm pollution, use drones," March 24). Why should the Maryland taxpayers pay the legal fees of Alan Hudson? Is this the new norm, to pay for legal fees when the state of Maryland isn't even a party to the case? The Hudson family is hardly blameless with respect to managing their farm in an environmentally responsible way to protect the Chesapeake Bay. This case is not the General Assembly's business. Are they now going to approve cases the University of Maryland School of Law decides to pursue?
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 23, 2013
Nobody asked me, but here are my six recommendations in the matter of the highly publicized, closely watched, widely criticized, rift-causing lawsuit brought by the Waterkeeper Alliance against the Hudson family poultry farm over alleged pollution in a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay on Maryland's Eastern Shore: •Everybody calm down, starting with the Maryland General Assembly. Already, the House of Delegates has authorized $300,000 — taxpayer dollars — for the legal fees of Alan Hudson, the farmer.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
With only minor changes, the House of Delegates on Wednesday gave initial approval to Gov. Martin O'Malley's $37 billion budget, the governor's first spending plan in several years that doesn't propose significant cuts. While a final vote in the House is expected Friday, Wednesday's actions signaled the last cuts the chamber will make before the budget proposal moves to the Senate. Delegates cut about $80 million in state spending, scaling back one of O'Malley's initiatives to improve digital learning in classrooms and nixing another that would have created a $5 million fund for innovative ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
The Anne Arundel County measure that could have required County Executive John R. Leopold to repay his legal expenses was withdrawn Monday night before it came to a vote. County Councilman Jamie Benoit, the sponsor, said he plans to let the state deal with the question of forcing public officials to repay taxpayers when a politician's actions put the government on the losing end of a lawsuit. The withdrawn legislation by Benoit, a Democrat from Crownsville, was similar to a state bill proposed by Sen. Bryan Simonaire, a Republican from Pasadena.
NEWS
July 10, 1995
Advice from the state attorney general has forced Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to abandon his vow to keep private how much quasi-public agencies such as the Baltimore Development Corporation spend on lawyers. But the mayor is still trying to circumvent public disclosure laws by refusing to include loan transaction fees in his promised report. Mr. Schmoke must have the best interests of his lawyer friends in mind, not the public.Companies that receive loans from quasi-public agencies such as BDC and the Community Development Finance Corporation are required to pay the legal fees associated with preparing the loan documents.
FEATURES
March 29, 1996
Clint Eastwood's lawyers have been awarded $653,156 in legal fees incurred in the actor's lawsuit against the National Enquier, in which a jury found the weekly tabloid had printed a bogus interview.The Enquirer was ordered to pay Mr. Eastwood $150,000 last October after a federal jury found it had knowingly printed an "interview" the actor-director never gave.The Enquirer claimed it bought the interview from a free-lance reporter and printed it in good faith. But the jury found that the tabloid either ignored signs the interview was fraudulent or failed with due diligence to check.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
Weeks after being publicly pressured to repay legal fees, Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold announced Wednesday that he will pay back taxpayers if he loses a pending sex discrimination case brought by a former employee. The private, $450-an-hour attorney hired to represent Leopold ran up a $21,000 tab to taxpayers during two weeks in August, raising questions about whether the embattled executive should accept a defense on the public dime. A Republican state lawmaker publicly called on Leopold, a Republican, to promise to repay the rising costs if found guilty, but Leopold answered with an Oct. 1 letter calling Sen. Bryan Simonaire a hypocrite.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
A state senator wants a new law to compel Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold to repay his taxpayer-funded defense if found guilty in a pending discrimination case. Sen. Bryan Simonaire announced Monday that state bill drafters are crafting legislation that would require elected local and state officials to refund taxpayers for legal fees and court awards when guilty in criminal or civil cases. Simonaire said he requested "The Taxpayer Protection Act" after Leopold, a fellow Republican, did not publicly pledge to repay the tab of a $450-an-hour attorney hired by the county.
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