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April 2, 2010
The Maryland Law School Board of Visitors, which I chair, is strongly opposed to withholding state funds for law school clinical programs because of objection by those accused of pollution of the Chesapeake Bay. The Maryland law school is lucky to have one of the leading public interest law clinics in the country undertaking to safeguard Chesapeake Bay. The General Assembly's attempt to withhold funding strikes a blow against both legal education and...
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Phoebe A. Haddon, dean of the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, will step down at the end of the coming school year to return to teaching, the school announced Friday. She expects to take a year sabbatical to research "contemporary challenges in legal education" then join the Maryland law faculty. "I truly believe that many opportunities lie ahead of us and that this institution is full of talented, committed people to take advantage of them," Haddon said in announcing her departure, according to school representatives.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Phoebe A. Haddon, dean of the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, will step down at the end of the coming school year to return to teaching, the school announced Friday. She expects to take a year sabbatical to research "contemporary challenges in legal education" then join the Maryland law faculty. "I truly believe that many opportunities lie ahead of us and that this institution is full of talented, committed people to take advantage of them," Haddon said in announcing her departure, according to school representatives.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
Politicians, donors and University of Baltimore alumni joined faculty and staff at the groundbreaking ceremony Thursday for the new John and Frances Angelos Law Center, a $107 million project on Mount Royal Avenue and North Charles Street. Construction of the 190,000-square-foot building is expected to be completed in 2012, making UB's law school the sixth-largest public law school in the country. Speakers including Gov. Martin O'Malley praised donors such as Orioles owner and UB law alumnus Peter G. Angelos, who contributed $5 million to the project in 2008 as well as an additional $5 million in June.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
Politicians, donors and University of Baltimore alumni joined faculty and staff at the groundbreaking ceremony Thursday for the new John and Frances Angelos Law Center, a $107 million project on Mount Royal Avenue and North Charles Street. Construction of the 190,000-square-foot building is expected to be completed in 2012, making UB's law school the sixth-largest public law school in the country. Speakers including Gov. Martin O'Malley praised donors such as Orioles owner and UB law alumnus Peter G. Angelos, who contributed $5 million to the project in 2008 as well as an additional $5 million in June.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 4, 1995
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. -- The dean of the Regent University School of Law stood before prospective students at a recent assembly and described what they would encounter in their classes:"A good, fundamental legal education," J. Nelson Happy promised. And "a walk with Jesus."It's not what incoming students hear at Harvard or Georgetown or the University of Baltimore.But it's how the law is taught at Regent, where evangelical broadcaster Pat Robertson is chancellor, classes begin with Bible readings and the secular legal system is analyzed through the prism of the Bible.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1991
One on One is a weekly feature offering excerpts of interviews conducted by The Evening Sunwith newsworthy business leaders. Parren J. Mitchell is a former U.S. congressman and founder of the Washington-based Minority Business Enterprise Legal Defense and Education Fund.Q. In creating the Minority Business Enterprise Legal Defense and Education Fund, what had you hoped to accomplish with it and where is it going?A.We've accomplished exactly or are accomplishing exactly what we wanted. I conceived of this in 1980 when I knew the Justice Department had sold us out. We became operational in 1984, been operational since.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1996
In Baltimore, Cassandra Sneed Ogden isn't a household name. But her son is.He's Jonathan Ogden, the 320-pound, 6-foot-8 lineman who was this year's No. 1 draft pick of the Baltimore Ravens.These days, Jonathan works through the trials of his first National Football League training camp. His mother is faced with an assignment no less daunting.The elder Ogden is executive director of the Council on Legal Education Opportunity, a nonprofit organization designed to give financial and moral support to minority and low-income law students.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
Sharon Fenick first heard the figure of speech "rule of thumb" cited as a sexist pejorative during her freshman year at Harvard seven years ago.The phrase was invoked in a lecture as an example of domestic abuse permitted by British common law. The rule of thumb, according to the professor, was a law that allowed a man to beat his wife so long as the rod used was no thicker than his thumb. But over the centuries, the term had evolved into vernacular for an "approximate measure.""It sounded very believable to me," says the 24-year-old Fenick, now in her third year of law school at the University of Chicago.
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1996
When should an attorney's classroom education end? On the last day of law school or the last day in law practice? It's a hotly debated question among attorneys, and one that a Republican state senator has joined by sponsoring legislation to make legal education courses mandatory for Maryland's 22,000 lawyers.To keep their licenses, lawyers would be required to complete 30 hours of legal courses every two years, according to the bill submitted by Sen. Martin G. Madden, a Howard County Republican.
NEWS
April 2, 2010
The Maryland Law School Board of Visitors, which I chair, is strongly opposed to withholding state funds for law school clinical programs because of objection by those accused of pollution of the Chesapeake Bay. The Maryland law school is lucky to have one of the leading public interest law clinics in the country undertaking to safeguard Chesapeake Bay. The General Assembly's attempt to withhold funding strikes a blow against both legal education and...
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1996
In Baltimore, Cassandra Sneed Ogden isn't a household name. But her son is.He's Jonathan Ogden, the 320-pound, 6-foot-8 lineman who was this year's No. 1 draft pick of the Baltimore Ravens.These days, Jonathan works through the trials of his first National Football League training camp. His mother is faced with an assignment no less daunting.The elder Ogden is executive director of the Council on Legal Education Opportunity, a nonprofit organization designed to give financial and moral support to minority and low-income law students.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 4, 1995
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. -- The dean of the Regent University School of Law stood before prospective students at a recent assembly and described what they would encounter in their classes:"A good, fundamental legal education," J. Nelson Happy promised. And "a walk with Jesus."It's not what incoming students hear at Harvard or Georgetown or the University of Baltimore.But it's how the law is taught at Regent, where evangelical broadcaster Pat Robertson is chancellor, classes begin with Bible readings and the secular legal system is analyzed through the prism of the Bible.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1991
One on One is a weekly feature offering excerpts of interviews conducted by The Evening Sunwith newsworthy business leaders. Parren J. Mitchell is a former U.S. congressman and founder of the Washington-based Minority Business Enterprise Legal Defense and Education Fund.Q. In creating the Minority Business Enterprise Legal Defense and Education Fund, what had you hoped to accomplish with it and where is it going?A.We've accomplished exactly or are accomplishing exactly what we wanted. I conceived of this in 1980 when I knew the Justice Department had sold us out. We became operational in 1984, been operational since.
NEWS
September 10, 2006
The quintessential Maryland gentleman, landowner and slaveholder Charles Carroll of Carrollton was born to immense wealth in Annapolis on Sept. 19, 1737. He had the best of everything, including a European tour abroad as a young man, a legal education at the Inns of Court in London and a 10,000-acre estate waiting when he returned home at the age of 28. In his late 30s, he was a leading revolutionary in colonial Annapolis, making his lavish home a center of society and political ferment.
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