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By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | January 13, 2009
J. Stanley Rotz, a retired FBI agent who later worked in the legal department of the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., died of a heart attack Jan. 5 at his Carney home. He was 92. Mr. Rotz , the son of a cabinetmaker, was born and raised in Fort Loudon, Pa. In his youth, he apprenticed with his father, helped run the local mill that supplied electricity to the town and maintained the ice house that kept the milk of local dairy farmers cold. After graduating from Lemaster High School, he enrolled at Shippensburg State College, where he earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1938.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | February 18, 2014
For as much media coverage as our snow days in Baltimore seem to receive it's often interesting to note that there is a very short list of goals on any given winter day in which the accumulation brings everything to a grinding halt. 1) dig out your car, 2) reserve parking space with furniture, 3) proceed to the nearest bar and drink copiously (but preferably responsibly according to the legal department). Considering the topic of this weekly column, goal No. 3 is our focus. The other day I made an earnest attempt at walking to the Inner Harbor or possibly beyond for some obligatory snowtography - hey look!
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | February 18, 2014
For as much media coverage as our snow days in Baltimore seem to receive it's often interesting to note that there is a very short list of goals on any given winter day in which the accumulation brings everything to a grinding halt. 1) dig out your car, 2) reserve parking space with furniture, 3) proceed to the nearest bar and drink copiously (but preferably responsibly according to the legal department). Considering the topic of this weekly column, goal No. 3 is our focus. The other day I made an earnest attempt at walking to the Inner Harbor or possibly beyond for some obligatory snowtography - hey look!
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | January 13, 2009
J. Stanley Rotz, a retired FBI agent who later worked in the legal department of the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., died of a heart attack Jan. 5 at his Carney home. He was 92. Mr. Rotz , the son of a cabinetmaker, was born and raised in Fort Loudon, Pa. In his youth, he apprenticed with his father, helped run the local mill that supplied electricity to the town and maintained the ice house that kept the milk of local dairy farmers cold. After graduating from Lemaster High School, he enrolled at Shippensburg State College, where he earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1938.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1997
An escalating number of lawsuits filed against Baltimore police officers has exhausted the department's budget for hiring outside law firms, and officials are asking the city for an additional $750,000 to cover expenses.City and private lawyers could not explain the surge, in which 15 lawsuits seeking $67 million in damages have been filed against officers this year.Seventy-five civil suits seeking $1.8 billion are pending against the department."Officers in many cases wind up going to full trials," said Gary May, chief legal counsel for the Police Department.
FEATURES
By Michael Blowen and Michael Blowen,Boston Globe | March 12, 1995
Remember Priscilla Goodbody?She was the fictional, invisible network censor trotted out every time Johnny Carson wanted to take a jab at the prim and proper Broadcast Standards and Practices office at NBC. She was a humorless schoolmarm type who objected to the word "toilet," demanded that married men and women on TV inhabit separate beds, if not separate rooms, and was constantly on Mr. Carson's case for his legendary double-entendres. She even wanted to censor his devilish smirk.Things change.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1994
Ernst & Young fires 240 peopleErnst & Young, one of the nation's largest accounting firms, said yesterday that it had dismissed about 240 people involved with its legal work, including 37 of its 65 lawyers. The firm also disclosed that it had replaced its general counsel, Carl D. Liggio, on Oct. 1.Under Mr. Liggio, Ernst & Young's legal department grew sharply beginning in 1989.@
NEWS
April 11, 2010
There will be a presentation on depression/anxiety and self-defense for women from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at Jenkins Memorial Church, 133 Riviera Drive, Pasadena. Program will feature speakers from the Domestic Violence Crises Center, Legal Department, Anne Arundel County Sheriff Ron Bateman's office and the States Attorneys Office. Information: 410-437-2846.
NEWS
January 11, 2007
JANE BOLIN, 98 Pioneering N.Y. judge Jane Bolin, whose appointment as a family court judge by New York City Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia in 1939 made her the first black woman in the United States to become a judge, died Monday in Queens, N.Y. She was the first black woman to graduate from Yale Law School, the first to join the New York City Bar Association and the first to work in the office of the New York City corporation counsel, the city's legal...
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Scott Higham and Caitlin Francke and Scott Higham,Sun Staff | August 23, 1999
The demand for a new trial filed last week on behalf of a man wrongfully convicted of murder poses serious questions for Baltimore prosecutors and police: Who failed to disclose key evidence in the case, and how did evidence mysteriously surface four years after the homicide?Detectives blame the state's attorney's office. Prosecutors blame the police. But so far, few answers have been provided about who is responsible for keeping the evidence from Antoine Jerome Pettiford."If ever there was a case which cried out for the mercy of the court, this is the case," Pettiford's attorney, Michelle M. Martz, wrote in the motion for a new trial filed Friday.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1997
An escalating number of lawsuits filed against Baltimore police officers has exhausted the department's budget for hiring outside law firms, and officials are asking the city for an additional $750,000 to cover expenses.City and private lawyers could not explain the surge, in which 15 lawsuits seeking $67 million in damages have been filed against officers this year.Seventy-five civil suits seeking $1.8 billion are pending against the department."Officers in many cases wind up going to full trials," said Gary May, chief legal counsel for the Police Department.
NEWS
September 4, 2003
Harford County Executive James M. Harkins received approval Tuesday night to hire a Missouri law firm for help in rewriting the county's development regulations. The County Council voted 6-1 to approve spending as much as $50,000 to hire the firm, Freilich, Leitner & Carlisle, to review the county's 20-year-old zoning and subdivision rules. Nancy Giorno of the county's legal department had made it clear that the administration would not agree to a memorandum of understanding, proposed by Councilman Robert G. Cassilly, that proposed an outline for the revision process.
NEWS
October 9, 1997
Imagine an audience that walks, makes noise, distracts the performer and then walks away. That was Mark Simons' audience yesterday in the rotunda of City Hall, where he performed classical guitar pieces. Every plink-plink-plink of Simons' six-string guitar had to compete with clanging keys, clopping shoes and the not-so-hushed chatter of people walking by."It's a very delicate instrument with limited dynamic range," Simons said of his guitar. He said that playing under such circumstances was "a challenge to the concentration."
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